Latin American and Caribbean Regional Expert Workshop on Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Buenos Aires, 13 May – 16 Ju - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Latin American and Caribbean Regional Expert Workshop on Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Buenos Aires, 13 May – 16 Ju PowerPoint Presentation
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Latin American and Caribbean Regional Expert Workshop on Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Buenos Aires, 13 May – 16 Ju
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Latin American and Caribbean Regional Expert Workshop on Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Buenos Aires, 13 May – 16 Ju

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  1. Latin American and Caribbean Regional Expert Workshop on Sustainable Use of BiodiversityBuenos Aires, 13 May – 16 June 2005 Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity Instituto Nacional de Technología Agropecuaria (INTA)

  2. Item 1 – Opening Welcome and introductions: • CBD – Secretariat • Government of Argentina: • Secretary of Environment • Secretary of Agriculture • Cancilleria Argentina • Instituto Nacional de Technología Agropecuaria (INTA) • Participants • Training team

  3. Item 1 – Objectives • Understand application of the Addis Ababa Principles of Sustainable Use • Understanding ecosystem services, including tools and methods to assess them • Understanding financial costs and benefits and tools to assess them • Assess applicability of Addis Ababa Principles of Sustainable Use to Agricultural Biodiversity

  4. Item 2 – Agenda • Welcome and introductions • Adoption of agenda and mandate • Objectives of the workshop • Key terms and concepts • Overview of Addis Ababa Principles • Application of Addis Ababa Principles

  5. Item 2 – Agenda • Ecosystem services assessment • Financial costs and benefits • Assessment of the workshop • Other matters • Adoption of workshop report • Closing remarks

  6. Item 2 – Mandate Decision VII/12 - • Calls for regional technical expert workshops to cover: • Sustainable use • Ecosystem services assessment • Financial cost and benefits • Invites Parties to: • Implement the Addis Ababa Guidelines • Integrate/Mainstream them in domestic measures • Disseminate experiences and lessons learned

  7. Item 2 – Mandate Decision VII/12 Invites research on:

  8. Item 2 – Mandate Decision VII/12 • Invites assessment of the applicability of the Addis Ababa Principles to Agricultural Biodiversity • Calls for guidance about the principles and guideline in relation to the CBD working programme on Agricultural Biodiversity

  9. Item 3 – Key terms/concepts Conceptual framework: Ecosystem services sustain life, biodiversity, and livelihoods

  10. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Biodiversity … The variety and variability of living organisms at the genetic, species and ecosystem levels and [the] ecological complexes, of which they are part

  11. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Biological resources … Include genetic resources, organisms or parts thereof, populations, or any other biotic component of ecosystems with actual or potential use or value for humanity

  12. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Agricultural biodiversity … Includes all components of biological diversity of relevance to food and agriculture – the variety and variability of plants, animals and micro-organisms at genetic, species and ecosystem level which are necessary to sustain key funcions in the agroecosystem, its structures and processes.

  13. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Sustainable use … The use of components of biological diversity that does not lead to long-term decline of biological diversity while maintaining the potential to meet the needs and aspirations of present and future generations

  14. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Use … May be either consumptive or non-consumptive

  15. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Sustainability … Is the probability that a use will be sustainable and is dependent on: • Maintenance of biological diversity and key ecological functions, and • Population(s) of target species remaining above thresholds needed for long-term viability, and • The component of biological diversity remaining a significant resource for people.

  16. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Ecosystem … Is a dynamic complex of plant, animal and micro-organism communities and their non-living environment interacting as a functional unit

  17. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Ecosystem services … • Provisioning - food, water, fiber and fuel • Regulating - climate, water quality, disease • Cultural - spiritual, aesthetic, recreation • Supporting - primary production, soil formation

  18. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Adaptive management … Is a cyclic, learning-oriented approach to the management of complex environmental systems that are characterized by high levels of uncertainty about system processes* * Based on a definition provided in Jacobson, C. (August 2003) Introduction to adaptive management. (Online) URL: http://student.lincoln.ac.nz/am-links/am-intro.htm

  19. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Use regime … The sum of the activities applied to the management and use of a geographically discrete biological resource

  20. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Resource managers … Those individuals directly responsible and accountable for managing a component of biological diversity for use

  21. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Assumptions: • Ecosystems and their components change • The supply of biological resources is limited • Biological resources can be used while maintaining ecological processes, species and their variability above thresholds for long-term viability • Secure delivery of ecosystem services requires management at the landscape scale

  22. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Conditions: • People depend on wild harvests • Women are often primary users • “Precaution” is the rule • Sustainable use policies can protect natural land/seascapes

  23. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Factors affecting sustainability: • Internal factors • External factors

  24. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Sustainable use and the Millennium Development Goals • Poverty reduction • Livelihood security • Health • Incentives for conservation of biodiversity

  25. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Ecosystem Approach • Biodiversity is considered with economic and social factors • Management is integrated • Social process

  26. Item 3 – Key terms & concepts Other relevant CBD initiatives • 2010 target • Incentive measures • Indigenous peoples • Tourism

  27. Regional Case Studies Uso sostenible de quanacos en esquemas mixtos de producción en la estepa patagónica - Julieta von Thungen, Argentina El uso sostenible de loro hablador en la ecoregion de Argentina – Ricardo Banchs, Flabio Moscchione, Isabel Barrios; Argentina Conservación in situ de amaranto en una zona representativa los andes meridionales occidentales –Maria Gloria Quispe Quispe, Peru Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles

  28. Item 5 – Applying the Principles • Discussion points • Relevance of the Addis Ababa principles to agricultural biodiversity: • Do individual principles have more relevance than others? • Does the relevance vary with the scale/focus of agricultural biodiversity use? • If there is relevance how should the principles be applied? • Relevance of the Ecosystem Approach in the context of management of agricultural biodiversity • Relevance of agricultural biodiversity to meeting the Millennium Development Goals

  29. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 1: Get the legal framework right Congruent policies, laws and Institutions at all levels of government - with links between them

  30. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 2. Responsibility with accountability • Empowerment • Access rights • Government oversight • Monitoring • Authority

  31. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 3. Avoid perverse incentives • Market distortions • Habitat degradation • Inequity

  32. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 4. Use adaptive management

  33. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 5. Minimize adverse impacts on the ecosystem • Management goals and practices • Understand role of managed resource • Monitor impact of use

  34. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 6. Invest in appropriate research • Applied - to answer management questions • Interdisciplinary • Government vs private

  35. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 7. Get the scale of use right • Jurisdictional • Ecological • Socio-Economic

  36. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 8. Seek international cooperation where necessary • Shared resources • Management needs • Optional approaches to cooperation

  37. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 9: Use an interdisciplinary and participatory approach wherever possible • Government • Resource managers • Local stakeholders • Others

  38. Regional Case Studies Necesidead de nuevo paradigm para la sustentabilidad del uso de los agroecosistemas: el caso del Chaco - Jorge Adámoli, Argentina Ostión del Norte: Northern scallop (Argopecten purpuratus) at La Rinconada, Antofagasta II Región de Chile – Leonardo Núñez Montaner, Chile Uso sostenible de recursos fitogenéticos: papa, maiz, poroto en el NOA – Andrea Clausen, Argentina Item 5 – Applying the Principles

  39. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 10: Know the value of the resource

  40. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 11: Minimize waste and adverse environmental impacts • Incidental take • Multiple products • Optimize benefits

  41. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 12: Ensure equitable distribution of benefits meet local needs • Who shares? • Balancing risks with benefits • Incentives

  42. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 13: Management costs should be covered by income • Direct costs and opportunity costs • Benefit flows • Economic incentives

  43. Item 4 – Addis Ababa Principles Principle 14: Educate people about sustainable use • Capacity enhancement • Communications • Public awareness

  44. Item 5 – Applying the Principles Aligning the principles for action Policy Related No Principle 1 Provide a legal/policy framework 2 Delegate responsibility and accountability 3 Remove perverse incentives 7 Link jurisdictional authority to scale of use 8 Where needed, promote international cooperation 13 Internalize management costs Support/Service Related No Principle 6 Promote/support interdisciplinary research 10 Economic valuation 14 Provide education on sustainable use Management Related No Principle 4 Use adaptive management 5 Minimize impact on the ecosystem 9 Take an interdisciplinary approach 11 Minimize waste 12 Distribute benefits equitably

  45. Item 5 – Applying the Principles Regional Case Studies • The case of mezcales and corn – Jorge Larson Guerra, Mexico • Agricultural biodiversity irradiation centers – Rubens Onofre Nodari, Brazil • Conservation of two Bahamian hot pepper varieties – Kenneth Richardson, Bahamas • Sustainable use case policy on Cassava: Manihot eculenta – Rufus Leandre, St Lucia

  46. Item 5 – Applying the Principles Sequence of management planning steps

  47. Que incluye la Biodiversidad Agrícola: *Extraido de: The Scope of Agricultural Biodiversity, Appendix, CBD-Decision V/5 Agricultural Biological Diversity (www.biodiv.org/decisions/dec=V/5) • Recursos Genéticos para alimentos y agricultura: Estos constituyen las unidades principales de producción en agricultura, incluyendo especies cultivadas, especies domesticadas y plantas y animales silvestres manejados, así como los parientes silvestres de las especies cultivadas y domesticadas, - Recursos genéticos vegetales cultivados y : • Pasturas y especies de pastizales naturales • Recursos genéticos de árboles que son una parte integral de los sistemas agrícolas • Recursos genéticos animales domésticos y silvestres en general: • y recursos genéticos de peces, en casos en que la producción de peces es parte del sistema productivo • Recursos genéticos de insectos {invertebrados} • Recursos genéticos de microbios y hongos

  48. B. Componentes de la diversidad agrícola que brinda servicios ecológicos tales como: • Ciclado de nutrientes, descomposición de la materia orgánica, y mantenimiento de la fertilidad del suelo • Regulación de Plagas y Enfermedades {mantenimiento de relaciones entre presas y predadores, reguladores de poblaciones, sp. saneadoras del ambiente, etc.} • Polinización (tanto de especies cultivadas como silvestres) {invertebrados, aves, mamiferos} • Mantenimiento y mejoramiento de la fauna silvestre local y los hábitat en sus paisajes • Mantenimiento de los ciclos hidrológicos {coberturas vegetales y forestales} • Control de la Erosión {cobertura y manejo correcto del suelo y la agricultura}, • Regulación del clima y del secuestro de carbono {forestacion, uso y manejo del suelo con siembra directa, conservación de bordes, etc}

  49. C. Factores Abióticos, que tienen un efecto determinante sobre los aspectos de la biodiversidad agrícola {conservación de la calidad del agua, el aire} • Conocimiento tradicional y local de la biodiversidad agrícola, factores culturales y procesos participativos. • Turismo asociado con los paisajes agrícolas • Otros factores socio-económicos D. Dimesiones socio-económicas y culturales, dado que la biodiversidad agrícola está moldeada en gran parte por las actividades humanas y las prácticas de manejo. Estas incluyen:

  50. Principales amenazas para el uso sostenible de la biodiversidad agrícola • Simplificación de ecosistemas y paisajes por deforestación, intensificación y reemplazo de ambientes debida a la extensificación agrícola, particularmente basada en monocultivos. • Erosión genética de especies vegetales, animales, y microorganismos por sobre-uso o alteración de la funcionalidad de los ecosistemas bajo usos productivos. • Pérdida de interacciones entre organismos lo que afecta procesos biológicos vitales para el funcionamiento del ecosistema, la dinámica de las poblaciones (tanto de planta-planta, plantas-microorganismos, plantas-animales, animales-animales, animales-ecosistema, ecosistema-microorganismos, etc.), así como los potenciales bienes y servicios para la producción agropecuaria y el bienestar humano. • Contaminación de suelos, agua, y aire por agroquímicos o residuos ganaderos • Intoxicación y mortandad de especies (plantas y animales) por usos y malos usos de agroquímicos. • Pérdida de hábitat para la diversidad de organismos que habitan los agroecosistemas • Erosión de suelos y cambios en condiciones físico-quimico y biológicas que pueden alterar su resistencia y resiliencia. • Cambio climático • Erosion cultural por perdida de conocimiento ancestral • ….otras?