ethics l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Ethics PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Ethics

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 15

Ethics - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 216 Views
  • Uploaded on

Ethics. What is “ethics”?. Branch of philosophy that deals with issues of right and wrong. Concerned with moral issues such as honesty, fairness, just, etc. A speaker’s character is being judged. Quintilian says that speechmaking is the “good person speaking well”.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Ethics' - Ava


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
what is ethics
What is “ethics”?
  • Branch of philosophy that deals with issues of right and wrong.
  • Concerned with moral issues such as honesty, fairness, just, etc.
  • A speaker’s character is being judged.
  • Quintilian says that speechmaking is the “good person speaking well”.
five sources of ethical standards
Five sources of ethical standards:
  • Utilitarian approach
  • Rights approach
  • Fairness or Justice approach
  • Common good approach
  • Virtue approach
  • Putting the approaches together.
guidelines for speaking ethical
Guidelines for speaking ethical
  • Make sure your speaking goals are ethical.
  • Be fully prepared for each speech.
  • Be honest in what you say.
  • Avoid name calling and abusive language.
  • Put ethical principles in practice.
  • Use a large amount of sources.
  • Distinguish between quotes and paraphrases.
plagiarism
Plagiarism
  • Plagiarism is “presenting another person’s language or ideas as one’s own.
  • Three types of plagiarism:
    • Global plagiarism: taking am entire speech from “one” source.
    • Patchwork: copying verbatim from two or three sources.
    • Incremental: copying verbatim specific parts or increments.
argumentative dishonesty
Argumentative Dishonesty
  • Advancing false conclusions.
  • Intentionally using old evidence.
  • Using unreliable sources.
  • Concealing available evidence.
  • Twisting or distorting evidence.
  • Fabricating information.
  • Using inferior evidence.
arguer orientations
Arguer Orientations:
  • Wayne Brockriede published an article in the 1970’s called “Arguers as lovers”.
  • He proposed that arguer orientations can be framed as (abuser)“rapist”, “seducer”, or “lovers”.
the arguer as rapist abuser
The arguer as “Rapist”(abuser)
  • Depersonalizes the other.
  • Relies on verbal aggressiveness. (name calling, ad hominems, etc . . )
  • Uses force, authority, sanctions.
  • Employs threats, ultimatums.
  • An example: poor litigants vs. large corporations.
the arguer as seducer
The Arguer as “Seducer”
  • Relies on harm, beguilement, trickery.
  • Creates an illusion of choice.
  • Utilizes ingratiation strategies.
  • Resorts to deception.
  • Employs illicit reasoning (false reasoning, withholding evidence, etc.)
rapists and seducers as arguers
“Rapists” and “Seducers” as Arguers
  • Displays disregard for the other person.
  • Views other as an “object” or “target” rather than as a person.
  • Emphasizes success, de-emphasizes relationships.
  • Unwilling to expose oneself to the risk of change.
  • Adopts only one perspective on a issue—one’s own.
arguers as lovers
Arguers as “Lovers”
  • Regards other as an equal, stresses power parity.
  • Values the relationship as much as (if not more than) the outcome of decision.
  • Emphasizes cooperation and collaboration over competition.
  • Values shared decision making, choice making.
  • Willing to risk values, knowledge, and self-esteem by engaging in argument.
conclusions
Conclusions:
  • The categories aren’t mutually exclusive, they are a matter of degree.
  • The categories are situational and contextual.
  • A person can change his or her orientation to arguing.
six pillars of character
Six Pillars of Character
  • Trustworthiness
  • Respect
  • Responsibility
  • Fairness
  • Caring
  • Citizenship
        • Taken from Michael Josephson (KNX)
ethical guidelines for listeners
Ethical guidelines for listeners
  • Be courteous and attentive!
  • Avoid prejudging.
  • Keep an open mind.