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The Leading from the Heart Workshop ®. YMCA MICHIGAN KEY LEADERS’ CONFERENCE 2005. “You will be confronted with questions every day that test your morals. Think carefully, and for your sake, do the right thing.”.

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slide1

The Leading from the HeartWorkshop®

YMCA MICHIGAN KEY LEADERS’ CONFERENCE 2005

slide2

“You will be confronted with questions every day that test your morals. Think carefully, and for your sake, do the right thing.”

slide3

“Ex-Tyco Chief Executive Kozlowski Sentenced to 8 to 25 Years”Headline / Bloomberg.com / 09.19.2005

slide4

Strong Fundamental Values

“We must demand of ourselves and of each other the highest standards of individual and corporate integrity. We safeguard company assets. We comply with all company policies and laws.”

Source:The Tyco Guide to Ethical Conduct

slide5

“We safeguard company assets.”

Regency mahogany bookcase, c. 1810, $105,000

George I walnut arabesque tallcase clock, $113,750

Custom queen bed skirt, $4,995

Custom pillow, $2,665

Ascherberg grand piano, c. 1895, $77,000

Chandelier, Painted Iron, c. 1930, $32,500

Pair of Italian armchairs, c. 1780, $64,278

Persian rug, 20 feet by 14 feet, $191,250

slide6

“Ebbers’ luck runs out in sweeping victory for feds”Headline / USA TODAY / March 16, 2005

slide7

“Eight Indicted In N.Y. Probe Of Bid-Rigging”Headline / Washington Post / September 16, 2005

slide8

I said, “Ship the documents to the feds.”

She heard, “Rip the documents to shreds.”

slide9

“In corporate America, crime pays.

Handsomely.

Grotesquely, even.”

Arianna HuffingtonPigs at the Trough

slide10

ONLY HALF,

ONE OUT OF TWO,

U.S. EMPLOYEES

TRUST THEIR

SENIOR LEADERS.

DO YOURS TRUST YOU?

51%

Source: Watson Wyatt’s WorkUSA 2004 Survey

slide11

“With fewer than half of employees expressing confidence in senior management, no company has been left untouched by the fallout from recent turmoil in the business environment.”

-Ilene Gochman, Ph.D., Watson Wyatt

slide12

used-car salesperson…slick

insurance agent…pushy

politician…dishonest

personal injury lawyer…greedy

postal worker…postal

slide13

business leader…justice-obstructing, debt-hiding, earnings-overstating thief who uses company funds to purchase personal artwork and to put on lavish birthdayparties for family members

slide14

age of Corporate Governance

Leadership for the 21st Century

slide15

Fact

In the war for talent, everyone is fighting over your best employees.

slide17

About half of Human Resource professionals say they are seeing new workers entering the workforce lacking overall professionalism, written communication skills, analytical skills, or business knowledge.

SHRM: 2005 Future of the U.S. Labor Pool Survey Report

slide18

“This issue is closely tied to public and higher education, and HR may be constrained in its ability to address the problem. Its repercussions, however, could be among the most severe to the future of the U.S. labor pool.”

Press Release, Society for Human Resource Management June 20, 2005

slide19

By 2012, one out of five workers will be fifty-five years old or older.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

slide20

“The Baby Boom is de-booming and soon there will be many more jobs than people available to fill them…It may be time to reconsider the ‘they have no place else to go’ strategy of employee retention.”

“Why Retention Should Become a Core Strategy Now” Harvard Management Update, October 2003

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Workers who believe their organizations act with integrity arenine times

more likely to stay in their current jobs.

Source: Walker Information - Commitment In The Workplace: The 2003 National Employee Benchmark Study

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But when they mistrust their bosses, or are ashamed of their organization’s conduct,

4 out of 5

workers say they feel trapped at work and are likely to leave their jobs soon.

Source: Walker Information - Commitment In The Workplace: The 2003 National Employee Benchmark Study

employees are searching for leaders with integrity who prove their credibility continuously
Employees aresearching for leaderswithintegritywho provetheircredibilitycontinuously.
values based leaders demonstrate six vital integrities they

Values-based leaders demonstrate six vital integrities. They:

Accept challenges and take risks

Master both listening and speaking

Live by the values they profess

Freely give away their authority

Recognize the best in others

Have a vision and convince others to share it

vital integrities
VitalIntegrities

Leadership actions that, when practiced proactively, demonstrate your organization’s existing values and further establish your credibility as a leader.

slide26

[5]

values-based leaders:

Recognize the Best in Others

vital integrities

Values-based leaders recognize that each person’s talents are unique and that a person’s best opportunity for growth is in exploiting those strengths.

slide27

21st Century Leadership… Moving Beyond Good to Great!

slide30

mas·ter

Noun. An artist or performer of great and exemplary skill; a worker qualified to teach apprentices and carry on the craft independently.

slide31
When striving for improvement, most of us do the same thing: we take our strengths for granted, and concentrate all our efforts on conquering our weaknesses.

The vast majority of organizations appear to believe that the best way for individuals to grow is to eliminate their weaknesses. So they instruct workers to recognize and focus on their deficiencies.

slide32

“Geeks are different from other people. If this comes as a shocking statement to you, you’re either oblivious to others or unusually charitable with your opinion about others.”–Paul Glen, Leading Geeks: How to Manage and Lead People Who Deliver Technology

slide33

GEEKSPEAK

Just when you understand the difference between a megahertz and a megapixel, geeks start talking about link rot and packet jams.

slide34

Geeks resist mainstream or official authority structures. They respect technical knowledge far more than where a person resides on the organizational chart.

slide35

As leaders, we would prefer that geeks behave like the rest of us. But our geeks’ personalities, even if grating to some, are immaterial to their productivity.

slide36

achieve

greatness

When we force our employees to strive for proficiency in everything, we miss the opportunity for them to

or mastery in something— in the one area where they may, indeed, achieve just that.

slide37

Gallop survey question:

“At work do you have the opportunity to do what you do best every day?”

Strongly Agree (20 percent)

slide38

Strongly Agree

38 percent more likely to work in business units with higher productivity

44 percent more likely to work in business units with high customer satisfaction scores

50 percent more likely to work in business units with lower turnover

Source:Now, Discover Your Strengths Marcus Buckingham and Donald Clifton

slide39

What prevents our employees from doing what they do best? Usually, our emphasis on what they do worst.

slide40

Identifying each person’s strongest talents permits everyone the opportunity to contribute what they do BEST.

slide41

In business, we tend to attribute

competence—or lack thereof—to an employee’s learning capacity. We further presume that what separates proficiency from competence is individual attitude and aptitude.

slide42

But we tend toconsider mastery out of reach, a level of attainmentreserved for those few who possess natural intelligence, good fortune, or a head start.

slide43

TEACHINGMASTERY

Most business organizations still use the intelligence theory approach to learning. Employers set expectations—formal or informal—for the time required to learn a job. And they figure that those unable to achieve proficiency in the prescribed timeframe simply lack the necessary capacity.

slide44

Using a clock to measure individual progress places all responsibility for learning on the employee. Consequently, organizations tend to overrate managers while underrating employees.

slide45

George Leonard, Mastery

Mastery “is not really a goal or a destination but rather a process, a journey. It’s available to anyone who is willing to get on the path and stay on it—regardless of age, sex, or previous experience.”

slide46

I start with the premise that the function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.

Ralph Nader

slide48

REHIRE

your employees

EVERY DAY