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  1. Your Professional “Workstyle” Appreciating diverse workstyles and keeping your Teams productive!

  2. Objectives • Identify your work-related communication style and how others perceive you • Recognize the characteristics of the four “workstyle styles” • Apply strategies to improve communication within your teams

  3. Your Personal ProfileAdapted from materials presented at the IHI International Conference in Orlando Florida, 2002 by Jean Penny and Diane Miller • Be honest with yourself…not how you would like to be.…but how you are • Focus on how you are in the work environment…..NOT home • You have to pick ONE of the four in each set a. ____Competitive b. ____Joyful c. ____Considerate d. ____Harmonious a. ____Tries new ideas b. ____Optimistic c. ____Wants to please d. ____Respectful a. ____Will power b. ____Open-minded c. ____Cheerful d. ____Obliging a. ____Daring b. ____Expressive c. ____Satisfied d. ____Diplomatic a. ____Powerful b. ____Good Mixer c. ____Easy on others d. ____Organized a. ____Restless b. ____Popular c. ____Neighborly d. ____Abides by rules a. ____Unconquerable b. ____Playful c. ____Obedient d. ____Fussy a. ____Self-reliant b. ____Fun-loving c. ____Patient d. ____Soft-spoken a. ____Bold b. ____Charming c. ____Loyal d. ____Easily led a. ____Outspoken b. ____Companionable c. ____Restrained d. ____Accurate a. ____Brave b. ____Inspiring c. ____Submissive d. ____Timid a. ____Nervy b. ____Jovial c. ____Even-tempered d. ____Precise Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  4. Your Personal ProfileAdapted from materials presented at the IHI International Conference in Orlando Florida, 2002 by Jean Penny and Diane Miller • Be honest with yourself…not how you would like to be.…but how you are • Focus on how you are in the work environment…..NOT home • You have to pick ONE of the four in each set a. ____Stubborn b. ____Attractive c. ____Sweet d. ____Avoid a. ____Decisive b. ____Talkative c. ____Controlled d. ____Conventional a. ____Positive b. ____Trusting c. ____Contented d. ____Peaceful a. ____Takes risks b. ____Warm c. ____Willing to help d. ____Not extreme a. ____Argumentative b. ____Light-hearted c. ____Nonchalant d. ____Adaptable a. ____Original b. ____Persuasive c. ____Gentle d. ____Humble a. ____Determined b. ____Convincing c. ____Good-natured d. ____Cautious a. ____Persistent b. ____Lively c. ____Generous d. ____Well-disciplined a. ____Forceful b. ____Admirable c. ____Kind d. ____Non-resisting a. ____Assertive b. ____Confident c. ____Sympathetic d. ____Tolerant a. ____Aggressive b. ____Life-of-the-party c. ____Easily fooled d. ____Uncertain a. ____Eager b. ____High-spirited c. ____Willing d. ____Agreeable Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  5. Scoring your Personal Profile • Count the number of “a”s that you marked. Write that number in the Tally Box marked “a”. Do the same with letters b,c,d. • On the a scale, draw a line through the number on the bar graph that corresponds with your total number of “a”s. That forms the end line of your bar graph. • Shade in the space in the “a” bar graph, up to your end line • Do the same for b,c,d. The total of a,b,c,d, should =24. • The longest bar is you predominant style. Tally Box

  6. Activity………… • Break up into groups based on your most predominate category: • A, B, C, or D • Within your group: • Name two things you like best about working in teams • Name two things you like least about working in teams • Collaborate with your group to write a slogan or draw a picture that represents your work style

  7. This model is based on OBSERVABLE behavior, not your perceptions or judgments. Be objective. In a situation where two or more people are interacting and where observable behavior can be described by an observer and verified by the observations of others.

  8. Assertiveness Continuum Low: Asks High: Tells Behavioral clues: Pace of speech Quantity of speech Volume of speech Hand motions Body posture Eye contact Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  9. Responsiveness Continuum Less responsive: Controls Emotions Behavioral clues: Emotion in voice Topics of conversation Descriptive Hand motions Body posture Facial expression More responsive: Emotes Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  10. Assertiveness + Responsiveness = Work Style Low responsiveness Analytical (d) Driver (a) Low Assertive High Assertive Amiable (c) Expressive (b) Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”. High responsiveness

  11. The Driver: Action Oriented Perceived positively as: • Decisive • Independent • Practical • Determined • Efficient • Assertive • Risk taker • Problem solver • Direct Perceived negatively as: • Pushy • One man/woman show • Tough • Demanding • An agitator • Cuts corners • Insensitive Materials adapted with verbal permission from Diane Miller, Director of Organizational Development at Virginia Mason Medical Center From IHI International Conference in Orlando 2002 Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  12. The Expressive: Intuition Oriented Perceived positively as: • Verbal • Inspiring • Ambitious • Enthusiastic • Energetic • Confident • Friendly • Influential Perceived negatively as: • A talker • Overly dramatic • Impulsive • Undisciplined • Excitable • Egotistical • Flaky • Manipulating Materials adapted with verbal permission from Diane Miller, Director of Organizational Development at Virginia Mason Medical Center From IHI International Conference in Orlando 2002 Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  13. The Amiable: Relationship Oriented Perceived positively as: • Patient • Respectful • Willing • Agreeable • Dependable • Concerned • Relaxed • Organized • Empathetic Perceived negatively as: • Hesitant • Wishy Washy • Pliant • Conforming • Dependent • Unsure • Laid back Materials adapted with verbal permission from Diane Miller, Director of Organizational Development at Virginia Mason Medical Center From IHI International Conference in Orlando 2002 Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  14. The Analytical: Thinking Oriented Perceived positively as: • Industrious • Persistent • Serious • Orderly • Organized • Cautious Perceived negatively as: • Critical • Picky • Moralistic • Stuffy • Stubborn • Indecisive Materials adapted with verbal permission from Diane Miller, Director of Organizational Development at Virginia Mason Medical Center From IHI International Conference in Orlando 2002 Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  15. Driver Analytical Expressive Amiable (Primary Effort) Works quicklyand alone (Secondary Effort) Impresses others with individual effort (Primary Effort) Works carefullyand alone (Secondary Effort) Impresses others with precision and knowledge (Secondary Effort) Works quickly and with others (Primary Effort) Impresses others as exciting member of the group (Secondary Effort) Works slowly and with team (Primary Effort) Gets along as integral member of the group Behavior directed toward achievement in an interpersonal setting Behavior directed toward acceptance in an interpersonal setting Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”.

  16. Back-up Mode Low responsiveness Driver Analytical Back-up behavior: Avoid Back-up behavior: Autocratic Low Assertive High Assertive Back-up behavior: Attack Back-up behavior: Acquiesce Amiable Expressive Based on the research of David W. Merrill and Roger Reid and published in “Personal Styles and Effective Performance”. High responsiveness

  17. How to Work Better with Other Styles…..the key is versatility! • When working with analytical: • Tell HOW first • Provide data (graphs, stats etc) • List pros and cons • Be accurate, logical • Give them time • Provide deadlines • Don’t rush or surprise • When working with Driver: • Tell WHAT first • Keep faced paced (efficient) • Don’t waste time (get to the point!) • Be businesslike • Give them choices (allows them to control • Talk results • When working with Amiable: • Tell WHY first • Use friendly tone of voice, lots of eye contact • Ask vs. tell them • Draw out their opinions • Explore personal life • Define expectations • Strive for harmony • Avoid deciding everything for them • When working with Expressive: • Tell WHO first • Keep it fast paced, direct eye contact • Be enthusiastic, allow for fun • Support creativity, intuition • Talk about the big picture, (not the details) • Handle the details for them • Value feelings and opinions • Be flexible Materials adapted with permission from Diane Miller, Director of Organizational Development at Virginia Mason Medical Center From IHI International Conference in Orlando 2002

  18. “Growth Actions” to improve your versatility • If you are a Driver: • LISTEN • Build cooperation into work relationships, talk about other people’s ideas • Avoid the temptation to answer every question immediately • Learn to make social small-talk! • If you are an Analytical: • Declare, take a stand, make a decision • Show emotional support for the feelings of others • Show some excitement and involvement in a relationship • Talk personally with people about their ideas, not dwell strictly on technical and abstract subjects • If you are an Expressive: • Check, slow down enough to consider the facts and feelings of others • Center conversation less on self • Tone down emotional reactions by presenting factual information and assist in defining goals • Talk more slowly and less during stressful situations • If you are an Amiable: • Initiate action, provide some direction and stick to goals and objectives • Limit the extent to which you pull others into your personal matters • Keep communication more in line with business manners Materials adapted with permission from Diane Miller, Director of Organizational Development at Virginia Mason Medical Center From IHI International Conference in Orlando 2002

  19. Assumptions About Personal Styles From:http://www.engr.washington.edu/lead/ There is no best or worst style. There are no pure styles. Behavior style does not explain the whole person Much of the population is different than you are. We all have goals we hope to attain and results we wish to achieve.