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Television in the Lives of our Children: Obesity and Social Development. Communication 436 April 11, 2002. Eric Meechan Jesse Duncan Soojin Choi Shawn Witty-Allen. Historical overview - Jesse. Obesity - Shawn. Social Development - Eric. Conclusions - Soojin. Historical overview….

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television in the lives of our children obesity and social development

Television in the Lives of our Children:Obesity and Social Development

Communication 436

April 11, 2002

Eric Meechan

Jesse Duncan

Soojin Choi

Shawn Witty-Allen

slide2

Historical overview - Jesse

  • Obesity - Shawn
  • Social Development - Eric
  • Conclusions - Soojin
historical overview
Historical overview….
  • 1700s AGRARIAN SOCIETY
    • hard physical labor for subsistence
    • limited food resources
  • 1800s FROM LATE AGRARIAN TO INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY
  • Migration to cities, change in labor patterns
  • Increase in consumer goods & income
  • Increase in food options
slide4

1900s from Industrial to Information Society

  • Food Processing changed what and how we eat
  • From physical to mental labor
  • Blinding pace of technological changes
  • 1901 - radio receivers
  • 1910 - first talking movies
  • 1929 - car radios
  • 1940 - color television
  • 1946 - microwave oven
  • 1987 - 3-D video games
obesity the problem

OBESITY:THE PROBLEM

  • TV viewing increases obesity in children

In less than one generation, childhood obesity has more than doubled

some facts
Some Facts...

About Kids & Television:

  • U.S. children watch an average of 21-28 hours every week
  • Children who watch 4 or more hours per day are much more likely to be obese
more facts
More Facts...

About Kids & Television:

  • The typical high school graduate
    • has spent 15,000-18,000 watching TV [equivalent to 625 & 750 days]
  • compared to 12,000 hours in school [equivalent to 500 days]
obesity ses and sex
OBESITY, SES, AND SEX
  • Lower SES watch more TV
  • Higher percentage are obese
  • Obesity and TV stronger in girls
  • General obesity more prevalent in boys (12.4% versus 10.9%)
negative effects associated with tv viewing
NEGATIVE EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH TV VIEWING...
  • Poor eating habits
  • Decrease in physical activity
  • Increased adiposity/obesity
  • Higher cholesterol levels
possible solutions
POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS...
  • Role modeling by parents
  • Restore "family" meals
  • Limit children's TV time and encourage spontaneous play
  • Pedal-powered TV?
slide13

Television Viewing Averages

The average child watches television

3-5 hours per day 7 days a week

960 - 1,680 hours per year.

Children lose 70 days

10 weeks to television annually

slide14

Television Viewing Averages

By 10 years a child can potentially lose nearly 2 years to television

Children are in school only 1,260 hours per year.

slide15

Social Learning Development

Social Learning Theory

- modeling - vicarious theoretical interpretation (reinforcement) - behavior script - evaluation

slide16

Social Learning Development

Television as a social agent - builds a child’s social perspective - serves as a social agent “secondary socializer” - direct impact on values, beliefs, behaviors, peer values

slide17

Social Learning Development

Cultivation Theory

assumes that the common perception of reality cultivatedin viewers have significant consequences, both personal and social. (Wright, 1986)

slide18

Social Learning Development

“Viewers who perceive, and believe in, television as a source of useful information that can help them vicariously to solve problems and to cope, likely perceive television as fairly realistic.” (Potter, 1986)

slide19

CONCLUSIONS & SOLUTIONS . . .

  • Role modeling by parents
  • Restore “family” meals
  • Limit children’s TV time, Encourage physical activities
  • Pedal-powered TV?
role modeling by parents
Role-modeling by parents
  • Develop a healthy lifestyle.
  • Make a few basic rules such as no television during meals, or before household tasks or homework are completed.
  • Involve family activities (hiking, bicycling, swimming, etc.)
role modeling by parents21
Role-modeling by parents
  • Encourage children to watch programs that demonstrate helping, caring and cooperation.
  • Explain to your child how drugs, violent and sexual content on entertainment programs is faked and what might happen if other people casually tried these same stunts. Discuss the difference between fantasy and reality.
restore family meals
Restore “family” meals
  • Eat healthfully and maintain weight.
    • Use the Food Guide Pyramid as a guide for healthful eating.
  • Assess dietary intake. Monitor portion sizes.
    • Wait few minutes before giving additional servings. A break allows the child to determine if hunger is the issue.
restore family meals23
Restore “family” meals

Modify food preparation if needed. Reduce the use of fats and sugars. Learn to modify recipes.

limit children s tv time encourage physical activities
Limit children’s TV time, Encourage physical activities
  • Children eat more when they watch TV.

They tend to eat things that are advertised on TV such as candy bars, sugared cereals)

  • Give children opportunities to explore new environment (ex, parks, museums, library)
limit children s tv time encourage physical activities25
Limit children’s TV time, Encourage physical activities

Take them to places where they’re able to interact with other children and make friends. (ex, sports, hobbies, conversation)

pedal powered tv
Pedal-powered TV?

An exercise bike hooked up to a television. Shows picture only when the pedals are moving. If they want to watch, they will have to pedal.

In experiments, children watched far less TV when they had to cycle.