Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
I. Imported Fire Ants in the U.S. History and Program Overview PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
I. Imported Fire Ants in the U.S. History and Program Overview

I. Imported Fire Ants in the U.S. History and Program Overview

361 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

I. Imported Fire Ants in the U.S. History and Program Overview

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. I. Imported Fire Ants in the U.S.History and Program Overview Based on a Presentation byDavid F. WilliamsDepartment of Entomology & NematologyUniversity of Florida A Teaching Module for Master Gardener Training

  2. Where are imported fire ants from? Where are they found in the US?

  3. 1918: estimated introductions occurred of black imported fire ant (Solenopsis richteri) First introduced in Mobile, Alabama Red imported fire ant (S. invicta) followed in the early 1930’s The two species have hybridized Imported fire ants currently infest 330 million acres in the U.S. No natural enemies native to U.S. History of Imported Fire Ants

  4. History of Imported Fire Ants, Cont. • IFA are the most destructive and costly ants in the U.S. • IFA thrive in disturbed habitats, natural or man-made disturbances • IFA continue to expand in the U.S. and their final range has yet to be reached

  5. Acknowledgments for their contributions to the original presentation • Anne-Marie Callcot, USDA-APHIS • David Oi, USDA-ARS • Roberto Pereira, USDA-ARS • Sanford Porter, USDA-ARS • Bart Drees, Texas A&M University • Walter Tschinkel, Florida State University – his book The Fire Ants, Spring 2006 • Fudd Graham, Auburn University

  6. For more information, visit eXtension athttp://www.extension.org/fire+ants Publications, slide sets, streaming video, posters, and more…

  7. Acknowledgments Thanks to the Texas Imported Fire Ant Research & Management Plan, Texas A&M University System, for the use of many of the images seen in this presentation. Portions of this presentation were made possible by a grant from the Southern Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Professional Development Program. Authors: • Kerry Smith – Alabama Cooperative Extension System • Molly Keck – Texas AgriLife Extension Service • Bart Drees – Texas AgriLife Extension Service • David Williams – University of Florida • Ken and Rufina Ward, Alabama A&M University

  8. Acknowledgments Reviewers: • Dale Pollet – Louisiana State University AgCenter • Karen Vail, University of Tennessee • Chazz Hesselein, Alabama Cooperative Extension System • Kathy Flanders, Alabama Cooperative Extension System Editor, Technical Facilitator: - Neal Lee