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NERC GADS Wind Data Reporting Workshop. G. Michael Curley Manager of GADS Services October 29, 2009. Who is NERC?. NERC was selected at the Electric Reliability Organization (ERO) under section 215 of the Electric Policy Act of 2005.

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nerc gads wind data reporting workshop

NERC GADS Wind Data Reporting Workshop

G. Michael CurleyManager of GADS ServicesOctober 29, 2009

who is nerc
Who is NERC?
  • NERC was selected at the Electric Reliability Organization (ERO) under section 215 of the Electric Policy Act of 2005.
  • We are responsible for the reliability of the electric bulk power supply of the US and 6 of the providences of Canada.
what is gads
What is GADS?
  • GADS has been collecting data from electric utilities since 1982. Prior to that, data was collected by the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) for many years.
  • In 2008, GADS collected power plant information on 5,800 generating units (786,000 MW) in North America.
  • Most unique and largest database in the world.
why collect data on wind turbines
Why collect data on wind turbines?
  • Growth of industry and need for new, clean sources of power require that GADS investigate and provide performance data for wind turbines.
    • ISO requirements
    • Reliability assessments
  • Industry interest and request for data for making wind turbines a part of their power portfolio.
    • Benchmarking
    • Measure of reliability and dependability
since the last presentation
Since the last presentation …
  • Started work in June 2006.
  • 88 members of the Wind Turbine Working Group
    • Owners/operators
    • ISO
    • PUC
    • Wind organizations (UWIG, AWEA)
wind dri
Wind DRI
  • Parts to the Wind DRI
    • Description of hierarchy (plants, groups and sub-groups)
    • Terms and definitions of outage types (performance reporting)
    • Categories of equipment associated with outages (component outage reporting)
    • Equations for performance measures
    • Examples of outage reporting
description of wtg hierarchy
Description of WTG Hierarchy

Plant (Farm or Park)  Group  Subgroup

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

utility wind farm or wind park
A plant is defined as a collection of wind turbine groups at a single physical location. Plant ID is a unique ID for the plant that you are reporting. This ID is referenced in all groups, sub-groups, performance, and component data existing under the plant.

Plant Name is the name used to identify the farm or park.

Utility/Wind Farm or Wind Park

Utility XYZ

Big Wind Wind Farm #1

Canyon Breeze Wind Farm #2

Cool Wind Wind Farm #3

Early Morning Wind Farm #4

wtg group identification
WTG Group Identification

Early Morning Wind Farm #4

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

wtg group identification12
WTG Group Identification
  • A group is one or more sub-groups that are connected to a common revenue meter. There may be any number of groups per wind plant. Each group has a unique number that identifies it as part of a particular wind plant. Each group will have a unique turbine group ID that will be associated with its child sub-group. This ID is assigned by the reporting utility.
wtg group identification13
WTG Group Identification

Wind TurbineGroups

  • Associated Plant Identifier
  • Turbine Group ID
  • Turbine Group Name
  • NERC Utility Code
  • NERC Unit Code
  • Installed Capacity in MW
  • Auxiliary Capacity
  • Commercial Date
  • Nearest City, State
  • Location Longitude and Latitude
  • Elevation
  • Wind Regime (topography)
  • SCADA Type
  • SCADA Manufacturer
  • SCADA Model
wtg group design details
WTG Group Design Details
  • Plant ID - a unique ID to the plant that you are reporting. This ID is referenced in all groups, sub-groups, performance, and component data existing under the plant.
  • Group ID - Enter a unique ID to the group that you are reporting. This ID is referenced in all sub-groups, performance data, and hours’ data existing under the group.
  • Group Name - the name given to the group that you are reporting.
  • NERC Utility Code - the three character alpha-numeric code NERC assigned to your utility. Appendix B contains a complete list of the utilities participating in GADS and their assigned utility codes.
  • NERC Unit Code - the three character alpha-numeric code your utility assigned for the unit that you are reporting. This code distinguishes one unit from another in your utility. Appendix B contains a guide for selecting unit codes.
  • ISO Resource ID - the unique identifier given to the group by the ISO.
wtg group design details15
WTG Group Design Details
  • Capacity - the total capacity for the entire group, measured in megawatts (MW).
  • Auxiliary Capacity - the combined capacities for all the auxiliary turbines not normally connected, and not part of GIC, measured in megawatts (MW).
  • Commercial Date - the date (MM/DD/YYYY), that the group came online and entered into active status.
  • Country - the two-letter country abbreviation where the group is located
wtg group design details16
WTG Group Design Details
  • Nearest City - the name of the city closest in proximity to the group.
  • State /Province - the two-letter state/province abbreviation where the group is located.
  • Longitude - the degrees of longitude of the physical location of the group.
  • Latitude - the degrees of latitude of the physical location of the group.
  • Elevation - the elevation of the physical location of the group, given in meters.
wtg group design details17
WTG Group Design Details
  • Wind Regime - the average topography of the area in which the group is located
  • Annual Average Wind Speed - the annual average wind speed (AAWS) at 80m, measured in meters per second
  • SCADA Type - the type of SCADA system being used.
  • SCADA Manufacturer
  • SCADA Model
wtg sub group identification
WTG Sub-Group Identification

Wind Turbine Sub-Group

  • Group ID
  • Turbine Sub-Group ID
  • Sub-Group Name
  • Commissioning Year
  • Typical Turbine Capacity
  • Total Turbines
  • Manufacturer
  • Make
  • Model
  • Rotor Height and Diameter
  • Cut-in and Cut-out Wind Speed
  • Turbine Wind Class
  • Turbulence
  • Wind Speed Range
  • Wind Shear
wtg sub group identification19
WTG Sub-Group Identification
  • A sub-group is a collection of wind turbine machines with the same manufacturer, designs, model number, and phase of construction. This data collection is a one-time event and it is strongly encouraged to follow the recommended guidelines mentioned. Each sub-group will have a unique identifier and be associated with its parent group. Component outage and performance data will be collected at this level.
wtg sub group id details
WTG Sub-Group ID Details
  • Plant ID - a unique ID to the plant that you are reporting. This ID is referenced in all groups, sub-groups, performance, and component data existing under the plant.
  • Group ID - a unique ID to the group that you are reporting. This ID is referenced in all sub-groups, performance data, and hours data existing under the group.
  • Sub-Group ID - a unique ID to the sub-group that you are reporting. This ID is referenced in all performance and component data existing under the sub-group.
  • NERC Utility Code - the three character alpha-numeric code NERC assigned to your utility. Appendix B contains a complete list of the utilities participating in GADS and their assigned utility codes.
  • NERC Unit Code - the three character alpha-numeric code your utility assigned for the unit that you are reporting. This code distinguishes one unit from another in your utility. Appendix B contains a guide for selecting unit codes.
wtg sub group id details21
WTG Sub-Group ID Details
  • Sub-Group Number - The sub-group number identifies all the individual sub-groups within a parent group. Each sub-group is assigned a unique code as they are entered starting with 1 through 999. If you have two groups, Group A having 2 sub-groups and Group B having 3 sub-groups, the sub-groups associated with Group A would be numbered 1 and 2, while the sub-groups associated with Group B would be numbered 1, 2, and 3.
  • Sub-Group Name - the name given to the sub-group that you are reporting.
  • Commissioning Year - the year (YYYY), that the sub-group was commissioned.
  • Typical Nameplate Capacity - the individual turbine capacity, or megawatt (MW) rating, of the typical wind turbine in the group. For example, if your subgroup is made up of twenty 1.5 MW turbines you would enter 1.5 MW.
  • Total Number of Turbines - the actual number of physical turbines that exist in the sub-group. For example, if your subgroup is made of twenty turbines you would enter 20.
wtg sub group design details
WTG Sub-Group Design Details
  • Manufacturer - the name of the manufacturer of the turbines in the sub-group. See Appendix F.
  • Make - the name of the make of the turbines in the sub-group.
  • Model - the model name of the turbines in the sub-group.
  • Rotor Height - the height of the rotor hub, given in meters.
  • Rotor Diameter - the diameter of the rotor, given in meters.
  • Cut-in Wind Speed - the lowest wind speed that the turbine will start to generate power, in meters per second.
wtg sub group design details23
WTG Sub-Group Design Details
  • Low Cut-out Wind Speed - the lowest wind speed that the turbine can continue to generate power before cutting out, in meters per second
  • High Cut-out Wind Speed - the highest wind speed at which the turbine is capable of generating power before cutting out, in meters per second.
wtg sub group turbine wind class details
WTG Sub-Group Turbine Wind Class Details
  • Turbulence
  • Wind Speed Range - the average range of wind speed where the sub-group is located, measured in meters per second
  • Wind Shear - the average strength of the difference between wind speeds from the tip of the rotor at its lowest point and its highest point.
design specs
Design Specs

Wind Speed Range

From the table below, select the average range of wind speed where

the sub-group is located, measured in meters per second.

time spent in various unit states
Time Spent in Various Unit States

Calendar Hours (CalTH)

Inactive Hours(ITH)

Period Hours (PDTH)

Inactive Reserve(IRTH)

Mothballed(MBTH)

Retired(RTH)

Available (SATH or EATH)

Unavailable (SUTH or EUTH)

Contact

(CTH)

Reserve Shutdown (RSTH)

Planned Outage (PTH)

Unplanned Outage

Resource Unavailable

(RUTH)

Forced Outage

(FTH)

Maintenance Outage (MTH)

what are turbine hours
What Are “Turbine-hours”?
  • Turbine-Hours are equal to the number of turbines in the group or sub-group times the number of Calendar Hours in the period. TH for any given condition for a given sub-group is equal to the total number of Calendar Hours that each wind turbine (WTG) in the sub-group spent in the given condition.
  • All of the following time/condition classifications are considered to be in turbine-hours.
    • For example, the number of TH for a group of 12 WTG in January (with 744 hours in January) would be 12 x 744 or 8,928 TH.
    • If one of those turbines were mothballed, the Period Turbine-Hours (PTH) would be 11 x 744 or 8,184 PTH with 744 Inactive Turbine-Hours.
wtg inactive hours
WTG Inactive Hours
  • Inactive Reserve Turbine-Hours – IRTH - Total number of turbine-hours for the period being reported that turbines within the sub-group are in the inactive reserve state.
  • Mothballed Turbine-Hours – MBTH - Total number of turbine-hours for the period being reported that turbines within the sub-group are in the mothballed state.
  • Retired Unit Turbine-Hours – RTH - Total number of turbine-hours for the period being reported that turbines within the sub-group are in the retired state.
wtg active states
WTG Active States

Period Hours (PDTH)

Available (SATH or EATH)

Unavailable (SUTH or EUTH)

Contact

(CTH)

Reserve Shutdown (RSTH)

Planned Outage (PTH)

Unplanned Outage

Resource Unavailable

(RUTH)

Forced Outage

(FTH)

Maintenance Outage (MTH)

wtg available turbine hours
WTG Available Turbine Hours
  • Period Turbine-Hours – PDTH - the number of hours that turbines within the sub-group are in the active state. PDTH can vary in output reports (month, year, etc.) but for GADS reporting purposes, data is collected on the number of turbine-hours in a month.
  • Contact Turbine-Hours – CTH - the number of hours that turbines within the sub-group are synchronized to the system. It is the turbine-hours that the contactors are closed without regard to the grid connection.
  • Reserve Shutdown Turbine-Hours – RSTH - the sum of all hours that turbines within the sub-group are available to the system at a reduced capacity for economic reasons. There are no equipment problems and the turbines are ready for service. Do not include RSTH in the same equations with CTH because this would double count turbine-hours
wtg unavailable turbine hours
WTG Unavailable Turbine Hours
  • Forced Turbine-Hours (FTH) - FTH is the sum of all the hours that turbines within the sub-group are off-line due to forced events. FTH are all forced events where the WTG must be removed from service for repairs before the next Sunday at 2400 (just before Sunday becomes Monday).
  • A few examples of forced events:
    • LS Generator identified as bad, but fails before it can be replaced
    • Underground Cable Failure
    • A turbine fails a hydraulic motor. There is no wind anywhere in the area. In fact, no power has been made on any turbine for over a week.
wtg unavailable turbine hours34
WTG Unavailable Turbine Hours
  • Maintenance Turbine-Hour (MTH) - MTH is the sum of all the hours that turbines within the sub-group are off-line due to a maintenance event.
  • A maintenance event is an event that can be deferred beyond the end of the next weekend (Sunday at 2400), but requires that a wind turbine be removed from service, another outage state, or Reserve Shutdown state before the next Planned event. Characteristically, a maintenance event can occur at any time during the year, has a flexible start date, may or may not have a predetermined duration, and is usually much shorter than a Planned Event.
  • If an event occurs before Friday at 2400, the above definition applies. If the event occurs after Friday at 2400 and before Sunday at 2400, the Maintenance event will only apply if the event can be delayed past the next, not current, weekend. If the event cannot be deferred, the event shall be a Forced Event.
wtg unavailable turbine hours35
WTG Unavailable Turbine Hours
  • Maintenance Turbine-Hour (MTH) –
  • A few examples of maintenance events:
    • Brand X manufacturer has developed a new operating program for their WTG and all turbines are scheduled for installation of the update.
    • Gases are slightly high in transformer. The transformer is monitored and replaced when convenient.
wtg unavailable turbine hours36
WTG Unavailable Turbine Hours
  • Planned Turbine-Hour (PTH) - PTH is the sum of all the hours that turbines in the sub-group are off-line due to a planned event. A Planned Event is scheduled well in advance and is of predetermined duration and can occur several times a year.
  • A few examples of planned events:
    • Substation maintenance
    • WTG preventative maintenance
site vs equipment views
Site vs. Equipment Views
  • Site Available Turbine-Hours (SATH) - SATH is the number of active turbine hours that the wind resource was available for generation. SATH is equal to the Period Turbine-Hours (PDTH) minus the sum of Planned Turbine-Hours (PTH), Forced Turbine-Hours (FTH), Maintenance Turbine-Hours (MTH) and Resource Unavailable Turbine-Hours (RUTH).
  • Equipment Available Turbine-Hours (EATH) - EATH is the total active turbine hours that the equipment is considered available for generation. It is equal to the sum of the Contact Turbine-Hours (CTH), Reserve Shutdown Turbine Hours and Resource Unavailable Turbine-Hours (RUTH).
  • Site Unavailable Turbine-Hours (SUTH) - SUTH is the total active turbine hours where the site was unavailable for generation due to equipment outages or unavailable resource. It is equal to the sum of Planned Turbine-Hours (PTH), Forced Turbine-Hours (FTH), Maintenance Turbine- Hours (MTH) and Resource Unavailable Turbine-Hours (RUTH).
  • Equipment Unavailable Turbine-Hours (EUTH) - EUTH is the total active turbine hours where the equipment was unavailable for generation due to equipment outages. It is equal to the sum of Planned Turbine-Hours (PTH), Forced Turbine-Hours (FTH), and Maintenance Turbine-Hours (MTH).
ruth available and unavailable
RUTH – Available and Unavailable
  • Resource Unavailable Turbine-Hours (RUTH)
    • RUTH is the number of turbine-hours the turbines within a sub-group is not producing electricity due to the wind too low or too high or was outside manufacturer’s operating specifications. For example, if 10 turbines stopped generating because of wind conditions for 3 hours each, RUTH would equal 30 turbine hours. RUTH is classified as Available Turbine-Hours for equipment calculations and Unavailable Turbine-Hours for site calculations.
outside management control43
Outside Management Control
  • OMC Forced Turbine-Hours – oFTH - oFTH is a sub-set of FTH that equals any forced turbine-hours that were due to causes deemed to be outside of management control.
  • A few examples of forced OMC events:
    • The Off-Taker calls and indicates that a truck has damaged a pole on the line carrying power from the site. The repair cannot wait and power will be down for a few hours.
    • Safety shutdown due to an approaching storm.
    • WTGs shedding ice on the local highway. The turbines were shutdown due to safety concerns
outside management control44
Outside Management Control
  • OMC Maintenance Turbine-Hour (oMTH) - oMTH is a sub-set of MTH that equals any maintenance Turbine-Hours that were due to causes deemed to be outside of management control (OMC). For more information on OMC, refer to Appendix G.
  • A few examples of maintenance OMC events:
    • A contractor off-site damages a high voltage (HV) cable. Repairs are made 2 weeks later.
    • Transmission line maintenance activities.
outside management control45
Outside Management Control
  • OMC Planned Turbine-Hour (oPTH) - oPTH is a sub-set of PTH that equals any planned Turbine-Hours that were due to causes deemed to be outside of management control.
  • A few examples of planned OMC events:
    • Planned Off-Taker outages
    • The Off-Taker is upgrading their system and power reduction is required
priority of outage reporting
Priority of Outage Reporting
  • In some instances, there may be more than one event occurring at the same time. In such cases, the group remains on the highest order of outage until it is cleared and then moves to the next level of outage reporting. As per the WTWG meeting, September 2008, the order of outages is as follows:
    • Contact Turbine-Hours
    • Forced Turbine-Hours
    • Maintenance Turbine-Hours
    • Planned Turbine-Hours
    • Reserve Shutdown Turbine-Hours
    • Resource Unavailable Turbine-Hours
106 equations
106 Equations
  • Resource and Equipment Calculations – These equations calculate the individual resource and equipment performance by turbine sub-group(s) that have the same, or very similar, capacities. These equations also include OMC hours.
  • Pooled Resource and Equipment Calculations – These equations pool the resource and equipment performance of sub-groups into collections of sub-groups, groups, or farms. These equations also include OMC hours.
  • Resource and Equipment Calculations without OMC Hours – These equations calculate the individual resource and equipment performance by turbine sub-group(s) that have the same, or very similar, capacities. These equations do not include OMC hours.
  • Multi-Resource and Multi-Equipment Calculations without OMC Hours – These equations pool the resource and equipment performance of sub-groups into collections of sub-groups, groups, or farms. These equations do not include OMC hours.
example of single group sub group equations
Example of Single Group/Sub-group Equations
  • Resource Equivalent Forced Outage Factor (REFOF) - % of period that the plant was forced off line. Including low and high winds.
  • Equipment Equivalent Forced Outage Factor (EEFOF) - % of period that the WTG equipment was forced off line.
  • Excluding low and high winds.
example of pooled equations
Example of Pooled Equations
  • Resource Equivalent Forced Outage Factor (REFOF)% of period that the plant was forced off line. Including low and high winds.
  • Equipment Equivalent Forced Outage Factor (EEFOF)% of period that the WTG equipment was forced off line.
example of performance report based on 1 266 wtg reporting in 200958
Example of Performance ReportBased on 1,266 WTG Reporting in 2009

Resource Indicators

Equipment Indicators

conclusion
Conclusion
  • GADS wind collection database is operational.
  • Data Reporting Instructions are available on line at http://www.nerc.com/page.php?cid=4|43|45.
  • Data collection software available online and free at the same link.
for more information
For More Information
  • Copy of Wind Data Reporting Instructions
  • Copy of software and layout for creating your own software:
    • http://www.nerc.com/page.php?cid=4|43|45
slide62
Question & Answer

Contact:

Mike Curley

Manager of GADS Services

[email protected]

801.756.0972

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