Awareness and Best Practices Regarding Deep Vein Thrombosis Panel 5 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Awareness and Best Practices Regarding Deep Vein Thrombosis Panel 5

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    1. Awareness and Best Practices Regarding Deep Vein Thrombosis Panel #5 Franklin A. Michota, MD Head, Section of Hospital Medicine Division of Medicine The Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    2. Physician Best-Practice We recommend that every hospital develop a formal strategy that addresses the prevention of thromboembolic complications. FormatFormat

    3. Appropriate VTE prophylaxis in patients at risk Perioperative beta-blockade Maximum sterile barriers for CVC insertion Perioperative antibiotics to reduce post-surgical infections Patients restating / recalling what they have been told during informed consent CASS (continuous aspiration of subglotic secretions) to prevent ventilator pneumonia Pressure-relieving bedding to prevent pressure ulcers Real-time ultrasonography to insert CVCs Self-management of warfarin Nutritional support post op and critically ill Physician Best-Practice The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has recently sponsored a report entitled “Making Health Care Safer: A Critical Analysis of Patient Safety Practices”. This report summarizes a systematic review of 79 patient safety interventions based on the strength of the evidence supporting more widespread implementation of these procedures. Here are the top ten safety practices according to the strength of the evidence As you can see, the highest ranked safety practice was the appropriate use of prophylaxis to prevent VTE in patients at risk. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has recently sponsored a report entitled “Making Health Care Safer: A Critical Analysis of Patient Safety Practices”. This report summarizes a systematic review of 79 patient safety interventions based on the strength of the evidence supporting more widespread implementation of these procedures. Here are the top ten safety practices according to the strength of the evidence As you can see, the highest ranked safety practice was the appropriate use of prophylaxis to prevent VTE in patients at risk.

    5. “The disconnect between evidence and execution as it relates to DVT prevention amounts to a public health crisis” Samuel Z. Goldhaber, M.D.

    6. Public is Unaware of DVT Less than 25% of respondents are aware of DVT Male sex, age<35 years, and lesser education are associated with lower DVT awareness Of those with some DVT awareness Only 46% were familiar with any signs or symptoms Only 43% had any knowledge of risk factors Only 25% were aware DVT could be prevented

    7. Advancing Awareness to Protect Patient Lives APHA/CDC Public leadership conference 60 thrombosis experts Increased diligence to prevention Raise public awareness

    8. Target Areas Coalition Public awareness campaign Communication tools State licensing boards Physician education National standards Reimbursement

    10. Public Awareness Campaign

    12. Media Campaign

    13. Communications Tools

    14. 109th Congress Senate Resolution 56 Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month – March 2005 Sen. Arlen Spector (R-PA) Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-ND) Sen. Sam Browback (R-KS In honor of the memory of David Bloom

    15. National Standards NQF Safe Practices for Better Healthcare Consensus Report 30 healthcare safe practices that should be universally utilized in applicable clinical care settings to reduce the risk of harm to patients “Evaluate each patient upon admission, and regularly thereafter, for the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis/venous thromboembolism” Utilize clinically appropriate methods to prevent DVT/VTE To answer this question, we can turn to the National Quality Forum for some practical advice. The National Quality Forum or NQF has issued a consensus report that details 30 healthcare practices that should be universally utilized in applicable clinical care settings to reduce the risk of harm to patients. Although this set of safe practices is not intended to capture all activities that might reduce adverse healthcare events, it has been carefully reviewed and endorsed. From the NQF consensus report, it is recommended that patients should be evaluated upon admission, and regularly thereafter, for the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis or venous thromboembolism. Furthermore, we should be utilizing clinically appropriate methods to prophylax against DVT which may lead to PE. My personal interpretation of these last several point is that we need to be looking at patients that enter our institutions for their respective risk of developing VTE, take the necessary steps to prevent VTE with appropriate strategies, and recognize that such an activity would improve quality of patient care and save money. What about your interpretation and conclusion?To answer this question, we can turn to the National Quality Forum for some practical advice. The National Quality Forum or NQF has issued a consensus report that details 30 healthcare practices that should be universally utilized in applicable clinical care settings to reduce the risk of harm to patients. Although this set of safe practices is not intended to capture all activities that might reduce adverse healthcare events, it has been carefully reviewed and endorsed. From the NQF consensus report, it is recommended that patients should be evaluated upon admission, and regularly thereafter, for the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis or venous thromboembolism. Furthermore, we should be utilizing clinically appropriate methods to prophylax against DVT which may lead to PE. My personal interpretation of these last several point is that we need to be looking at patients that enter our institutions for their respective risk of developing VTE, take the necessary steps to prevent VTE with appropriate strategies, and recognize that such an activity would improve quality of patient care and save money. What about your interpretation and conclusion?