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How do these view differ on flag burning? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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How do these view differ on flag burning?. Should Burning the American Flag be Legal?. What reasonable consequences might one face for their expression. Freedom of Expression. Types of Expression: Pure speech: spoken word, verbal expression Symbolic speech: expressive action

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Presentation Transcript
freedom of expression
Freedom of Expression
  • Types of Expression:
    • Pure speech: spoken word, verbal expression
    • Symbolic speech: expressive action
    • Seditious Speech: challenges authority
    • Defamatory speech: false speech
      • Slander: spoken
      • Libel: written
    • Obscenity: offensive speech
    • Commercial Speech
    • Political Speech
right to privacy
Right to Privacy?
  • Constitutional Right?
    • Not Enumerated:
      • 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 9th Amendment
      • Griswold and Roe
    • Katz
      • 4th protects people not places
      • Dissent: 4th refers to tangible items
cases
Cases
  • Olmstead v. US (1929)
    • Eavesdropping in public area
  • Katz v. U.S. (1967)
    • Expectation of privacy in public (people not places)
  • Griswold v. Conn. (1965)
    • Use of contraception (consenting adults in the home)
  • Roe v. Wade (1973)
    • Right to abortion protected
  • Ouinlan (1976) & Cruzan (1990) cases
    • Right to refuse treatment, must have “clear and convincing evidence” it was their wish
  • Washington v. Glucksburg (1997)
    • No right to suicide
  • Lawrence v. Texas (2003)
    • Sodomy laws unconstitutional (consenting adults in the home)
  • Gonzales v. Oregon (2006)
    • Legality of physician assisted suicide left to states
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