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Academic and Administrative Leaders’ Forum April 27, 2006 Data, Dialogue, Decide and DO! PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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WELCOME. Academic and Administrative Leaders’ Forum April 27, 2006 Data, Dialogue, Decide and DO! Using Western’s Campus Communications Survey and Culture Survey Results to Increase Workplace Engagement. Data, Dialogue, Decide and DO!

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Academic and administrative leaders forum april 27 2006 data dialogue decide and do using western s campus communi

WELCOME

Academic and Administrative Leaders’ Forum April 27, 2006

Data, Dialogue, Decide and DO!

Using Western’s Campus Communications Survey and Culture Survey Results to Increase Workplace Engagement


Academic and administrative leaders forum april 27 2006 data dialogue decide and do using western s campus communi

  • Data, Dialogue, Decide and DO!

  • Using Western’s Campus Communications Survey and Culture Survey Results to Increase Workplace Engagement

  • Michael Sullivan, The Strategic Counsel

  • Dr. John Meyer, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Western

  • Tim Jackson, Masters of Organizational Psychology Candidate


Academic and administrative leaders forum april 27 2006 data dialogue decide and do using western s campus communi

Western’s Organizational Culture Inventory

June 2003 and November 2006

Campus Communications Survey November 2003 and February 2006


Ideal culture 2003

Ideal Culture, 2003

  • Set realistic but challenging goals, make plans, and take ownership for reaching those goals

  • Enjoy work and bring to the job our integrity, creativity, and desire to learn and develop our talents to the fullest.

  • Help and encourage each other, show concern, and support each other’s success, without win-lose competition.

  • Motivate each other with friendliness, care about the group’s satisfaction and success, and build community in the workplace.


Actual culture 2003

Actual Culture, 2003

  • Decrease:

  • Pushing decisions upwards

  • Avoiding the tough decisions

  • Opposing new ideas

  • Focussing on flaws

  • Do More:

  • Thinking in unique and independent ways

  • Enjoying our work

  • Building relationships


Academic and administrative leaders forum april 27 2006 data dialogue decide and do using western s campus communi

Western’s Organizational Culture Inventory

June 2003 and November 2006

Campus Communications Survey November 2003 and February 2006


2006 survey objectives

2006 survey objectives

  • Assess changes in perceptions of internal communications since 2003 survey

  • Understand preferred sources and channels for specific information needs

  • Identify priority areas for improvement


2006 survey methodology

2006 survey methodology

  • Conducted by The Strategic Counsel

  • Modified from 2003 questionnaire

  • Sample size = 5,800

  • Total response = 1,433 (25%)

  • Online = 1,345

  • Paper = 88

  • Faculty response = 297 (21%)

  • Staff response = 807 (56%)

  • Remainder did not identify (23%)


Summary of survey findings

Summary of survey findings

Communications have improved since 2003

  • More than half of those with an opinion agree

  • “updated regularly on changes to policies & procedures” - 53% agree (vs. 43% in 2003)

  • “provided with relevant information – 60% agree (vs. 50% in 2003)

  • “provided with information when needed” – 60% agree (vs. 48% in 2003)

  • Few people (1 in 20) say communications from any individuals or groups have worsened


Overall impressions of employee communications

Overall Impressions of Employee Communications

% Agree (5, 6 or 7 on a 7-point scale)

Q.1:Thinking of your experience working at Western, please indicate how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. For each statement, please check one response only.

*Change in question wording

Base:All respondents


Perceptions of change in quality of communications from primary sources

Perceptions of Change in Quality of Communications from Primary Sources

University President(n=215)

Head or Director of Department(n=507)

University Vice-Presidents(n=120)

Dean/Associate Dean(n=233)

(Staff only) Your Direct Supervisor(n=412)

Human Resources Department(n=402)

“Grapevine”(n=588)

Communications…

Q.7:Please indicate if communications from and to those you indicated were a primary source of information have improved, worsened, or stayed about the same in the last 2 years.

Base:Among those who indicated source was “primary”


Summary of survey findings1

Summary of survey findings

People “largely satisfied” they are kept informed

  • no major issues with quality of communications from any individuals or groups

  • no major issues with regularly used major channels

  • no fewer than half say Western is doing a good job providing information on: employment benefits, job postings, academic/operational plans, recognition programs, mission & goals, policies & procedures


Familiarity with information relevant to employees

Familiarity with Information Relevant to Employees

TotalFamiliar (5,6,7)%

Employment benefits

74

Job postings and other opportunities for advancement

63

My Faculty’s Academic Plan/My department’s or unit’s operational plan

61

Western’s mission and goals

59

Western’s policies and procedures

58

Western’s workplace health and safety policy and programs

49

Information coming from the Leaders/Managers Forum

32

Q.2:Thinking of your experience working at Western, please indicate how familiar you consider yourself to be with the following topics or issues. For each statement, please check one response only.

Base:All respondents (n=1433)


Assessments of communications about information relevant to employees

Assessments of Communications about Information Relevant to Employees

TotalExcellent/Good (5,6,7)%

Employment benefits

65

Job postings and other opportunities for advancement

60

My Faculty’s Academic Plan/My department’s or unit’s operational plan

57

Western’s mission and goals

55

Western’s policies and procedures

51

Western’s workplace health and safety policy and programs

46

Information coming from the Leaders/Managers Forum

33

Q.3:For the following topics or issues, please indicate how well Western is doing in keeping you informed.

Base:All respondents (n=1433)


Summary of survey findings2

Summary of survey findings

Clear roles perceived for different individuals or groups with respect to information they deliver

  • President = vision, goals and relationship with community

  • HR Dept. = benefits, career opportunities, health & safety

  • Deans/Directors/Supervisors = academic/operational unit plans, local policies and procedures

    Note: Faculty members prefer to receive information from academic sources


Preferred sources for information relevant to employees

Preferred Sources for Information Relevant to Employees

Q.6:For the issues and topics listed below, which of the following people should provide each type of information directly to you? Please check as many as apply.

Base:All respondents


Preferred sources for information about events initiatives

Preferred Sources for Information about Events/Initiatives

Q.6:For the issues and topics listed below, which of the following people should provide each type of information directly to you? Please check as many as apply.

Base:All respondents


Preferred source s for receiving information

Preferred Source(s) for Receiving Information

Q.10For each of the following subjects, please indicate which would be your preferred source(s) for receiving information about these subjects. (For each subject, please indicate as many sources as necessary)

Base:All respondents


Summary of survey findings3

Summary of survey findings

Home page and Western News remain most frequently read communication vehicles

  • Home page (86% use/read regularly/occasionally)

  • Western News (84%)

  • Broadcast emails and Western Matters (75%)

  • External media, HR web site, Faculty/Dept. web site (73%)

    Note: Staff more likely to use these sources, except for Faculty web sites


Frequency of reading using different publications

Frequency of Reading/Using Different Publications

TotalRegularly/ Occasionally%

Western’s Home Page

86

Western News

84

External media outlets

74

Broadcast emails

75

President’s electronic newsletter, Western Matters

75

Human Resources website

73

Faculty/Departmental websites

73

Faculty & Staff website

66

Faculty/Departmental newsletters

57

Student Gazette newspaper

49

President’s Annual Report

47

Alumni Gazette magazine

42

Western’s Research Newsletter

28

Student recruitment brochures

26

Q.9Please indicate how frequently you read/use the following publications or resources.

Base:All respondents (n=1433)


Summary of survey findings4

Summary of survey findings

Room to improve the amount of information provided on certain key topics:

  • Workplace health and safety policy and programs

  • Information coming from Leaders/Managers Forum

  • Academic/operational plans

  • General policies and procedures

  • Employment benefits

  • Western’s relationship with London area community


Level of information need about different topics issues

Level of Information Need about Different Topics/Issues

2006 Q. 5 For the following topics or issues, please indicate your level of information need. For each topic/issue, please check only one response only.

Base:All respondents


Level of information need about different topics issues1

Level of Information Need about Different Topics/Issues

% “Need More Information”

2006 Q.5:For the following topics or issues, please indicate your level of information need. For each topic/issue, please check only one response only.

2003 Q. 4:And thinking of each of the following topics or issues, please indicate whether you would like to receive more information than you do now, less information than you do now, or about the same.

*Change in question wording

Base:All respondents


Summary of survey findings5

Summary of survey findings

Room to improve on the extent of consultation with staff and faculty about important issues

  • Fewer than half agree Western encourages two-way communication between administration and faculty/staff

  • Fewer than half agree Western usually consults when making changes to mission/goals, policies, procedures, and when developing new University-wide initiatives

  • 30% disagree that Western usually consults


Perceptions of effort made to consult and communicate with employees

Perceptions of Effort Made to Consult and Communicate with Employees

TotalAgree (5,6,7)%

Overall, Western has improved the way it communicates with faculty and staff over the past 2 years

47

Overall, Western has improved the way it consults with faculty and staff over the past 2 years

40

I am updated regularly on changes to University policies and procedures

53

I am updated regularly on faculty, staff, student and alumni achievements

65

I am made aware of new University initiatives that might affect me

56

Western usually consults with faculty and staff when making changes to its mission, goals, policies, procedures and when developing new University-wide initiatives

37

(Staff only) My direct supervisor does a good job of communicating with me about any changes or policies or programs at Western that might have a direct effect on me or my work

58

Q.1:Thinking of your experience working at Western, please indicate how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements. For each statement, please check one response only.

Base:All respondents (n=1433)


Academic and administrative leaders forum april 27 2006 data dialogue decide and do using western s campus communi

Data, Dialogue, Decide, and DO


Leadership practices and employee commitment

Leadership Practices and Employee Commitment

John Meyer & Timothy Jackson

Department of Psychology

The University of Western Ontario


Key points

Key Points

  • A committed workforce benefits all

    It’s “win-win” for employees

    and the organization

  • Leaders play a key role in building commitment

    • Directly – through their interactions

    • Indirectly – through the conditions they create


What is commitment

What is Commitment?

A Definition

Commitment is a mindset that binds an individual to an entity or cause, and to course of action of relevance to that entity or cause.


What is commitment1

What is Commitment?

Defining Characteristics

  • Internal – a state of mind

  • Targeted – made to an entity or cause with specified terms

    • Organization – continue employment

    • Policy – implement fully and consistently

    • Project – work toward successful completion

  • Binding – makes disengagement difficult


Why is commitment important

Why is Commitment Important?

Commitment has been found to have the following benefits:

  • Retention

  • Engagement

  • Performance “beyond expectation”

  • Employee well-being

But, not all commitments are equal!


How commitments differ

How Commitments Differ

Mindset Matters!

Commitment can be characterized by three different mindsets (alone or in various combinations)

  • Desire (“I want to …”)

  • Obligation (“I ought to …”)

  • Perceived cost (“I have to …”)


Why mindset matters an illustration

Why Mindset Matters:An Illustration

The Context

  • Survey of hospital employees in Alberta

  • 545 full- and part-time non-management employees

Gellatly, Meyer & Luchak (2006)


Why mindset matters

Why Mindset Matters

The Measures

  • Commitment to the organization

    • Desire-based

      e.g., “This organization has a great deal of personal meaning for me.”

    • Obligation-based

      e.g., “I owe a great deal to my organization”

    • Cost-based

      e.g., “It would be very hard for me to leave this organization now even if I wanted to.”


Why mindset matters1

Why Mindset Matters

The Measures (continued)

  • Intention to remain

    e.g., “I rarely think of quitting my job.”

  • Discretionary Performance

    e.g.,“volunteering to do tasks that are not normally part of the job”


Why mindset matters2

Why Mindset Matters


Why mindset matters3

Why Mindset Matters

Average for all employees


Why mindset matters4

Why Mindset Matters

Profiles reflect relative strength of the three mindsets


Why mindset matters5

Why Mindset Matters

Lowest intention to stay among the “uncommitted”


Why mindset matters6

Why Mindset Matters

Lowest Discretionary Performance for “Cost-based Commitment”


Why mindset matters7

Why Mindset Matters

Best “combination” when desire and obligation are both strong


Why mindset matters8

Why Mindset Matters

  • Value-based Commitment

    • “right and desirable thing to do”


Building value based commitment

Building Value-based Commitment

Major factors include …

  • Organizational support

    • Commitment to employees demonstrated through caring and valuing

  • Fair treatment

    • Policies and practices that ensure fair distribution of resources, and treatment with dignity and respect

  • Shared values

    • Identification with the organization and a sense of common purpose

  • Meaningful work

    • Opportunity to take responsibility for something that makes a difference, and to see the results


Transformational leadership

Transformational Leadership

  • 4 dimensions for effective leadership

    • Idealized Influence

    • Inspirational Motivation

    • Intellectual Stimulation

    • Individualized Consideration


Transformational leadership1

Transformational Leadership

  • Idealized Influence

    • Talk about important values and beliefs

    • Communicate a strong sense of purpose

    • Consider ethical/moral consequences of decisions

    • Emphasize the importance of having a collective sense of mission


Transformational leadership2

Transformational Leadership

  • Inspirational Motivation

    • Articulate a compelling vision of the future

    • Talk optimistically about the future

    • Talk enthusiastically about what needs to be accomplished

    • Express confidence that goals will be achieved


Transformational leadership3

Transformational Leadership

  • Intellectual Stimulation

    • Re-examine critical assumptions to question whether they are appropriate

    • Suggest different ways of looking at problems

    • Seek differing perspectives when solving problems

    • Encourage direct reports to look at problems from different angles


Transformational leadership4

Transformational Leadership

  • Individualized Consideration

    • Spend time teaching and coaching

    • Treat direct reports as individuals, not just as members of a group

    • Consider individual direct reports as having different needs, abilities, and aspirations as others

    • Help to develop direct reports’ strengths


Walking and talking communication and leadership

Walking and Talking: Communication and Leadership

  • Two types of communication are implied by the transformational leadership paradigm

    • Verbal communication

      • E.g. articulating a compelling vision of the future

      • E.g. expressing confidence that goals will be achieved

    • Behavioural communication

      • E.g. showing direct reports concern for their development and growth

      • E.g. considering the moral/ethical consequences of decisions

  • Transformational leadership suggests that both types of communication are important, and that consistency between messages sent is important


Leadership commitment and performance

Leadership, Commitment and Performance

Leadership

Commitment

Performance

Performance


Current research leadership and job attitudes survey

Current Research – Leadership and Job Attitudes Survey

Leadership

Identification

Commitment

Performance


Best principles

Best Principles

To build value-based commitment…

  • Provide organizational support

  • Treat employees fairly (policies and practices)

  • Emphasize shared values between employees and the organization

  • Provide opportunities for meaningful work

    For effective leadership…

  • Use transformational principles as appropriate in a given work situation

  • Show consistency between verbal and behavioural communication


Thank you

Thank you!

  • If you have further questions, or would like more information about this research, please contact one of us:

  • John Meyer: [email protected]

  • Tim Jackson: [email protected]


Data dialogue decide and do

Data, DIALOGUE, Decide and Do

  • What’s one tip on building commitment that stood out for you?

  • If values-based or affective commitment is the goal, what are you doing now to achieve it; what challenges do you face?

  • What questions do you have for Tim and John?


2006 2007 forum series

2006-2007 FORUM SERIES

  • October 26, 2006

  • November 30, 2006

  • January 18, 2007

  • March 22, 2007

  • April 26, 2007


Thank you facilitators

Thank you, Facilitators!

Jennifer AshendenScott May

Krys ChelchowskiDonna Moore

Donna Chute-DolanNancy Patrick

Chris CostelloTerry Rice

Deb DawsonPeggy Roffey

Karli FarrowMalcolm Ruddock

Andrew FullerHarriet Rykse

Stephanie HayneNancy Stewart

Ruth HeardMary Stiles

Ruta Lawrence


Academic and administrative leaders forum april 27 2006 data dialogue decide and do using western s campus communi

Have a safe and happy spring and summer!


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