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Your exam paper. Intro to Academic Writing. Your course paper. Format: 6 to 10 pages in Times New Roman size 12 (2500 to 4000 words approx.) not including bibliography and illustrations

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Your exam paper

Your exam paper

Intro to Academic Writing


Your course paper

Your course paper

  • Format: 6 to 10 pages in Times New Roman size 12 (2500 to 4000 words approx.) not including bibliography and illustrations

  • Individual or in groups (groups of 2 have to present 8 to 12 pages, of 3: 10 to 14 pages) OBS: gruppeopgaver SKAL have individuelt hæfting

  • Need to relate to course topics (I will godkende problem formulation in advance)

  • Need to quote relevant bibliography from pensum

  • Proper quotes (see Gauntlett)


The academic genre definition

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study or ”case”

  • of a ”theoretical” problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


The academic genre definition1

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study or ”case”

  • of a ”theoretical” problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


What to write about a problem

What to write about: a problem

  • a lacune / hole / gap in knowledge

  • something not completed

  • an unexplained observation

  • a unfitting / standing out / ”strittende” observation

  • something not analysed categorized

  • something that bothers or tickles

  • opposites / contrasts that still cause discussion

  • something that can and should be argued

  • something fall does not comply with mainstream thinking

  • something that needs (re)evaluation, change, or construction

  • something in need of novel prescriptions / handleforskrifter

    (Rienecker 2005 125)


The academic genre definition2

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study or ”case”

  • of a ”theoretical” problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


Theories and methods sources

Theories and methods: sources

  • Primary, secondary and tertiary litterature

  • Research papers (usually peer reviewed)

  • Conference papers (often peer reviewed)

  • White papers, technical documents

  • Internet (homepages, google, wikipedia, …)

  • Popular science

  • Magazines, newspapers, leaflets,

    You are responsible and accountable for the information you take from sources – be critical and improve your information competencies.


The academic genre definition3

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study or ”case”

  • of a ”theoretical” problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


Papers should

Papers should

  • argue

  • discuss

  • evaluate

  • investigate

  • nuance

  • problematize

  • prove

  • provide reasons for / begrunde

  • render probable / sandsynliggøre

  • show

    (Rienecker 1999 254)


Papers should not

Papers should not

  • agitate

  • confess

  • entertain

  • evangelize / missionere

  • lecture / belære

  • popularize

  • postulate

  • praise

  • review / anmelde

  • talk about / causere

  • teach

  • turn down

    (Rienecker 1999 254)


The academic genre definition4

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study

  • of a problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


Types of readers

Types of readers

Experts

  • Researchers

  • Developers

  • Fellow students

  • Teachers, examiners

    Laymen

  • Educated laymen

  • Laymen

  • Broad public

  • Unknown

    Others

  • Customers


The academic genre definition5

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study

  • of a problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


Academic ideals

Academic ideals

  • Information should be true or rendered probable

  • reasoning can be followed: method, argumentation, and structure

  • systematic and methodical

  • rest upon, refers and relates to earlier work

  • up-to-date knowledge of earlier work

  • attitude is unprejudiced, honest

  • considers contrasting information and points

  • language is clear and explicit – the reader should not need to interpret the meanings or points

    (Rienecker 2000 47)


The academic genre definition6

The Academic Genre: Definition

  • documentation

  • of a study

  • of a problem

  • using the areas’s theories and methods

  • aiming at convincing a colleague

  • about the validity

  • of the results and conclusions of the study/investigation

  • presented in a manner acceptable to the academic discourse community

    (Rienecker 2005 21)


Acceptable relates to

Acceptable relates to

  • Presentation (language, spelling, grammar, punctuation, …)

  • Formalities (references, footnotes, ….)

  • Format (often specified by publishers, house styles)

  • Contents

  • The acceptable standards vary in different research communities and research/subject areas.


Questions for getting started

Questions for getting started

  • What is your interest based in/on? When did it start?

  • Do you have concrete examples and empirical data?

  • Have you made any observations?

  • Do you want to further any points?

  • What would you like to argue for?

  • Where do you see the most controversial/new/problematic in the topic?

  • How do you connect this to the area and theoretical?

  • On what basis do you want to make your arguments?

  • What is you purpose in addressing this problem?

  • How can working with this problem enhance your competances and toolbox?

    (Rienecker 1999 153)


Next steps

Next steps

  • Problem formulation and paper focus (1 April)

  • Structuring your papers (8 April)

  • On quotes and writing process (15 April)

  • Status report to writing group (22 April)

  • Present your draft to class and experts (6 Maj)

  • Hand-in date (21 Maj)


Academic writing

Academic Writing

  • Materials Compiled by Anker Helms Jørgensen, who teaches our phd students this topic

  • All material comes from:

    • (Blåsjö 2000)Blåsjö, Mona (2000): Uppsatsens yta och djup - Studenters skrivutveckling mellan B- och C-uppsats [Surface and depth of the student essay. Writing development of university students.] TeFa report 33, Dept. of Nordic Languages, Stockholm University.

    • (Booth 1995)Booth, Wayne C., Colomb, Gregory G., and Williams, Joseph M. (1995): The Craft of Research. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    • (Heltberg 1997)Heltberg, Eva and Kock, Christian (red): Skrivehåndbogen [The Writer’s Handbook]. Gyldendal, 1997.

    • (Rienecker 1997)Rienecker, Lotte (1997): Den gode opgave – arbejdsprocesser og kvalitetskriterier i opgaver på humaniora [The Good Essay – work processes and quality criteria in essays in the Humanities]. Gyldendal.

    • (Rienecker 1999)Rienecker, Lotte and Jørgensen, Peter Stray (1999): Opgaveskrivning på videregående uddannelser - en læreRbog [Writing essays in higher education – a Teacher’s handbook]. Frederiksberg, Samfundslitteratur.

    • (Rienecker 2000)Rienecker, Lotte and Jørgensen, Peter Stray (2000): Den gode opgave - opgaveskrivning på videregående uddannelser [The good essay – writing essays in higher education]. 2. udg. Frederiksberg: Samfundslitteratur.

    • (Rieneceker 2005)Rienecker, Lotte and Jørgensen, Peter Stray (2005): Den gode opgave. Håndbog i opgaveskrivning på videregående uddannelser [The good essay. Handbook in writing essays in higher education]. Samfundslitteratur.

    • (Swales 2000)Swales, John. M and Feak, Christine (2000): English in today’s research world – a writing guide. University of Michigan Press.

    • (Swales 2004)Swales, John M and Feak, Christine B. (2004): Academic Writing for Graduate Students – essential tasks and skills. Univ. Michigan Press. 2nd ed.


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