writing and learning communities
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Writing and Learning Communities

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

Writing and Learning Communities - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 59 Views
  • Uploaded on

Writing and Learning Communities. Why is student writing so bad?. They wrote the paper last night and finished at 2:00 a.m., leaving no time for editing and revision. They are uncertain what to prioritize. They are uncertain about audience expectations.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Writing and Learning Communities' - yaron


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
why is student writing so bad
Why is student writing so bad?

They wrote the paper last night and finished at 2:00 a.m., leaving no time for editing and revision.

They are uncertain what to prioritize.

They are uncertain about audience expectations.

They are learning a new language—Academic English.

At every level—including grad school—writing suffers when students encounter a new discipline.

how learning communities make better writers1
How learning communities make better writers

Students in learning communities learn to write for an audience that includes their peers.

In effective peer review groups, students learn to see their writing as others see it.

Students learn to see writing as a collaborative process, not an isolated product.

Students can be more invested in writing on a subject they study in depth.

how writing makes better learning communities1
How writing makes better learning communities

Research shows that learning communities focusing on skills are more effective.

Increased opportunities for making connections and integrating learning in formal and informal writing assignments.

Students see themselves and their peers as sources of knowledge.

models for writing in learning communities
Models for writing in learning communities

Peer review groups in classes

Shared classes for majors or general interests

Freshman Interest Groups (FIGS)

Linked courses

Team-taught Freshman Inquiry courses

peer review groups in individual classes
Peer Review Groups in individual classes

Benefits

Limits

Students gain awareness of audience and process, and receive more feedback

Students learn to see their writing as others see it

Lacks sustained focus of high-impact practices

Less opportunity to integrate learning

shared classes
Shared classes

Benefits

Limits

Courses organized by major or interest

Shared interests can increase student engagement

Students develop ongoing peer support

Most effective for 4-year programs

Integrated learning is limited

shared classes at cwu that include writing
Shared Classes at CWU that include writing:

STEP program

Composition sections for Music, Art, Theatre Arts

freshman interest groups
Freshman Interest Groups

Benefits

Limits

Courses organized by theme

Opportunities to integrate learning across disciplines

Can include UNIV 101

Integrated learning limited if instructors do not coordinate

Past efforts at CWU have attracted little interest among students

linked courses
Linked Courses

Benefits

Limits

Overlapping syllabi encourage integrated learning

Most effective for writing, learning communities

More opportunities for writing-to-learn activities

More work for instructors

Difficult to schedule

Some students may not be eligible for ENG 101 or 102

models for linked courses
Models for linked courses:

One-to-one: same-sized writing and content courses

One-to-many: multiple composition sections linked to larger lecture course

Most effective when instructors develop courses jointly

Most effective when instructors receive recognition and administrative support for jointly developing courses

ad