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Art History Renaissance 1400 Italy Neo-classicism - 1700s Romantisism – 1800s Realism – 1850s Impessionism – 1870s Expressionism – 1900s Surrealists – 1930s Pop art – 1960s Post modernism – 1980s. Impressionist music (1870s). Monet Debussy Mozart.

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Art History

Renaissance 1400 Italy

Neo-classicism - 1700s

Romantisism – 1800s

Realism – 1850s

Impessionism – 1870s

Expressionism – 1900s

Surrealists – 1930s

Pop art – 1960s

Post modernism – 1980s


Impressionist music 1870s
Impressionist music (1870s)

Monet

  • Debussy

  • Mozart



Surrealist film 1930s
Surrealist film (1930s)

"To disrupt the mental anxiety of the spectator“ - Dali

Warning: some nudity & blood


Literature as social challenge or social glue
literature as social challenge or social glue?

Consider art history

- realist – Impressionists – Expressionists - Surrealists – etc

- femism, marxism

Read article

- Novels to uphold social order

Write paragraph about:

‘good artists borrow, great artists steal’ – Picasso


Good artists borrow great artists steal picasso
‘good artists borrow, great artists steal’- Picasso

Art and Appropriation


Development appropriation
Development - Appropriation

To appropriate something involves taking possession of it. In the visual arts, the term appropriation often refers to the use of borrowed elements in the creation of new work.

The borrowed elements may include images, forms or styles from art history or from popular culture, or materials and techniques from non-art contexts.


Photography & painting

Beginning in the 1960s artists such as Warhol, Richter and Artschwager, began making paintings that translated photographic images taken from newspapers and advertisements.

This painting shows how photography has influenced not just the content but also the technique of painting.

Andy Warhol, Big Electric Chair, 1967.


Gerhard Richter’s Woman with Umbrella, a moving portrait of a distressed woman, is in fact based on a photograph of a grieving Jackie Kennedy but could easily be any ordinary passer-by.

“I did not take it [photography] as a subsititute for reality but as a crutch to help me get to reality,” a quote by him on the gallery wall explains.

Gerhard Richter, Woman with Umbrella, 1964,


Liu Xiaodong’s “A Transsexual Getting Down Stairs” (2001) brings to mind Marcel Duchamp’s “Nude Descending a Staircase.”

Such references interweave art history in ways that work for most of us on a subconscious level.

Liu Xiaodong “A Transsexual Getting Down Stairs” (2001)

Nude descending a staircase no2 1912 by Marcel Duchamp


Music is not exempt from appropriation either. In their music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge.


Rappers & DJs music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge. sample and remix other people’s work…

… painters and poets

do the same!


Pop art
Pop Art music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge.

In the 1950s, a group of artists in Great Britain and the USA, rather than despising popular culture, gladly embraced its imagery and its methods.

Their audacity at first scandalized the Establishment, but by the mid-1960s their work dominated the world art scene and names such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg were familiar to many.


Film art music photography fashion
Film, art, music, photography, fashion… music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge.

They all look to (and steal) from

each other. You can’t detach

yourself from the world, and

the influences, around you.


Why galleries libraries museums
Why galleries, libraries, museums? music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge.

  • Artists don’t (often!) work with their eyes closed, and ideas don’t (often!) come from thin air...

  • Galleries, libraries 7 museums are full of original ideas and inspiration.

  • Artists submerge themselves in the culture of their surroundings, and feed off it for inspiration.


Picasso music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge. Here, Picasso has appropriated (borrowed, and made his own) the form and subject of Velasquez’s ‘Las Menias’ to create a new work .


Richard prince
Richard Prince music video for their song Lemon, U2 pay tribute to the photographer Muybridge.

In 2005, a Richard Prince photograph of a Marlboro cigarettes advertisement

was auctioned for over $1.2 million - a world record. He photographed the

Marlboro ad without permission removing the identifying marks. In a 1977

essay, Prince proclaimed that he was "practicing without a license" – referring

to his practice of stealing other people's pictures and publishing them as his

own.



In 2003, Mark & Dinos Chapman famously bought and then altered a set of Los Caprichos, - a series of etchings by Goya. Working on top of the original prints they ‘vandalised’ the original work, by painting on top of it. In doing this, they literally ‘appropriated’ the work of Goya and made it their own, placing the original in a different context and creating something new.

The Chapman Brothers


The Chapman Brothers altered a set of Los Caprichos, - a series of etchings by Goya. Working on top of the original prints they ‘vandalised’ the original work, by painting on top of it. In doing this, they literally ‘appropriated’ the work of Goya and made it their own, placing the original in a different context and creating something new.


The Chapman Brothers altered a set of Los Caprichos, - a series of etchings by Goya. Working on top of the original prints they ‘vandalised’ the original work, by painting on top of it. In doing this, they literally ‘appropriated’ the work of Goya and made it their own, placing the original in a different context and creating something new.


The Chapman Brothers appropriated the work of Goya more than once… and in a number of different ways.

Great Deeds Against The Dead by Jake and Dinos Chapman (1994)

Goya Disasters of War, 1810 - 20


The Chapman Brothers didn’t only ‘appropriate’ from Goya, they have also worked on top of a number of Victorian portraits, ‘defacing’ the original sitter, by giving them a new and ghostly disguise.

They also worked into a number of

Hitler’s original drawings for the exhibition

‘If Hitler was a hippie, how happy would he be?’


Fashion architecture
Fashion & Architecture Goya, they have also worked on top of a number of Victorian portraits, ‘defacing’ the original sitter, by giving them a new and ghostly disguise.

Alexander McQueen & Sydney Opera House (by Jørn Utzon)


Balenciaga & Guggenheim-Museum Bilbao (by Frank O. Gehry) Goya, they have also worked on top of a number of Victorian portraits, ‘defacing’ the original sitter, by giving them a new and ghostly disguise.


Emilio Pucci & Finca Güell in Barcelona (by Antoni Gaudí) Goya, they have also worked on top of a number of Victorian portraits, ‘defacing’ the original sitter, by giving them a new and ghostly disguise.


Akris & Holocaust Memorial Berlin (by Peter Eisenman) Goya, they have also worked on top of a number of Victorian portraits, ‘defacing’ the original sitter, by giving them a new and ghostly disguise.




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