Diversifying the stem pipeline
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Diversifying the STEM Pipeline. Darris W. Williams Program Coordinator – LSAMP Onondaga Community College. In 2010, there were 7.6 million STEM workers in the United States, representing about 1 in 18 workers.

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Diversifying the STEM Pipeline

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Diversifying the stem pipeline

Diversifying the STEM Pipeline

Darris W. Williams

Program Coordinator – LSAMPOnondaga Community College


Diversifying the stem pipeline

  • In 2010, there were 7.6 million STEM workers in the United States, representing about 1 in 18 workers.

  • STEM occupations are projected to grow by 17.0 percent, 1.29 million more jobs, from 2008 to 2018, compared to 9.8 percent growth, for non-STEM occupations.

  • STEM workers command higher wages, earning 26 percent more than their non-STEM counterparts.

    Source: U.S. Department of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration


Recent and projected growth in stem and non stem employment

Recent and Projected Growth in STEM and Non-STEM Employment

18%

17.0%

15%

STEM employment

Non-STEM employment

12%

9.8%

9%

7.9%

6%

3%

2.6%

0%

2000-10 growth

2008-18 projected growth

Source: ESA calculations using Current Population Survey public-use microdata and estimates from the Employment Projections Program of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Diversifying the stem pipeline

Employment of Workers Age 25 and Over with a Bachelor’s Degree or Higher, by STEM Occupation and STEM Undergraduate Degree, 2009 Employed persons in thousands

STEM degree

Total Total Computer Math Engineering Physical & Non-STEM

life sciences degree

Total 41,530 9,262 1,359 646 3,706 3,551 32,268

STEM employment 4,7363,327 763 167 1,738 659 1,409

Computer and math 2,167 1,331 637 120 447 128 835

Engineering 1,444 1,225 39 19 1,083 85 219

Physical & life 654484 8 9 54 413 170

science

STEM manager 471287 80 19 155 33 184

Non-STEM 36,794 5,935 595 479 1,968 2,892 30,859

employment

Source: ESA calculations using American Community Survey public-use microdata.


Reasons for leaks in the stem academic pipeline

Reasons for Leaks in the STEM Academic Pipeline

  • National statistics show a lack of graduates among minorities and women in the STEM fields.

    Trends are reflected by graduation rates at the bachelor’s degree level. NSF data from 91 “selective colleges” were studied (Hayes, 2002).

  • Nationally, underrepresented minorities account for only 15.7% of the bachelor degrees awarded in science and engineering in 2001.(Yelamarthi and Mawasha, 2008)

  • Lack of community - Students without an appropriate peer community suffer from a lack of critical mass (White-Brahmia & Etkina, 2004 (Seidman, 2005)

  • Financial need -College admissions/recruitment efforts may be out of synch with the information needs of students and their families. (Seidman, 2005)

    Source: Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students in STEM Fields Provided by Nancy Nestor-Baker and Sandra Kerka The Ohio State University, October 2009


Reasons for leaks in the stem academic pipeline1

Reasons for Leaks in the STEM Academic Pipeline

  • The STEM dropout rates for AALANA are substantially higher than those of European decent or Asians decent. (About 50% African American & Native American freshmen entering STEM majors drop out or switch majors and 66% of Hispanic students do not complete their degrees. In fact, nationally, African-American, Hispanic and Native American students accounted for only 12% of the total STEM degrees awarded in 1998 (White, 2005).

  • Lack of academic preparation – Many AALANA & female students do not take the most challenging math and physics in high school (many don’t get the opportunity).

  • Unrealistic expectations - Students may hope to pass with little effort

    Source: Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students in STEM Fields Provided by Nancy Nestor-Baker and Sandra Kerka The Ohio State University, October 2009


Reasons for leaks in the stem academic pipeline2

Reasons for Leaks in the STEM Academic Pipeline

  • The STEM dropout rates for AALANA are substantially higher than those of European decent or Asians decent. (About 50% African American & Native American freshmen entering STEM majors drop out or switch majors and 66% of Hispanic students do not complete their degrees. In fact, nationally, African-American, Hispanic and Native American students accounted for only 12% of the total STEM degrees awarded in 1998 (White, 2005).

  • Lack of academic preparation – Many AALANA & female students do not take the most challenging math and physics in high school (many don’t get the opportunity).

  • Unrealistic expectations - Students may hope to pass with little effort

  • National statistics show a lack of graduates among minorities and women in the STEM fields.

    Trends are reflected by graduation rates at the bachelor’s degree level. NSF data from 91 “selective colleges” were studied (Hayes, 2002).

    Source: Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students in STEM Fields Provided by Nancy Nestor-Baker and

    Sandra KerkaTheOhio State University, October 2009


What does work to improve the stem academic pipeline

What Does Work to Improve the STEM Academic Pipeline

  • Top-level administrative support: Expressed support for improvements in minority student recruitment and retention at the highest administrative levels (Jenkins, 2006).

  • Early outreach: Activitiesdesigned to increase college awareness in students at the elementary, junior high and high school levels and enlarge the pool of college-bound minority students. (MSCU, 2002)

  • Nontraditional recruitment:Activities that go beyond the college fairs and high school visits: Recruiting students of color in community centers, churches, and other settings. Utilizing current minority students and alumni to recruit. Recruiters engage the parents and other family members .

    Source: Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students in STEM Fields Provided by Nancy Nestor-Baker and Sandra Kerka The Ohio State University, October 2009


What does work to improve the stem academic pipeline1

What Does Work to Improve the STEM Academic Pipeline

  • Bridge programs: Helps students make the transition from high school to college. Some programs are discipline based, especially in math and the sciences.

  • Academic and social support services programs: Provides the help that students may need in dealing with the demands of their academic programs or in dealing with an unfamiliar cultural milieu.

  • Learning Communities (LCs): Address the learning needs of a range of students while also providing a structure for collaboration among faculty and between faculty and student affairs professionals (Clark, 2007)

  • Undergraduate Research: Undergraduate research experiences (REU) as a powerful tool to attract and retain students in science majors, promote graduate school aspirations, and serve as a pathway toward careers in science (Hurtado et al., 2009).

    Source: Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students in STEM Fields Provided by Nancy Nestor-Baker and Sandra Kerka The Ohio State University, October 2009


Diversifying the stem pipeline

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