Are standards really standards any more
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 20

Are Standards Really Standards Any More? PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 61 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

In response to Wyn Cudlip with regards to an IDN profile of ISO 19115 …. Are Standards Really Standards Any More?. M élanie F. Meaux NASA / GCMD. Questions …. What is a standard? Why should standards be used? What really makes a standard a standard? What are the standards?

Download Presentation

Are Standards Really Standards Any More?

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Are standards really standards any more

In response to Wyn Cudlip with regards to an IDN profile of ISO 19115 …

Are Standards Really Standards Any More?

Mélanie F. Meaux

NASA / GCMD


Questions

Questions …

  • What is a standard?

  • Why should standards be used?

  • What really makes a standard a standard?

  • What are the standards?

  • What are the common metadata standards?

  • Are profiles impacting interoperability?

  • How can communities achieve maximum interoperability?


Just what is a standard

Just what is a standard?

“A standard is simply a common set of terms and definitions that are presented in a structured format.”

Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)


Why should standards be used

Why should standards be used?

  • Data Discovery

  • Data Interoperability / Exchange

  • Data Access / Re-Use

  • Data Intercomparison

…and saves time and money !


Why bother with a standard if

Why bother with a standard if,

  • “Field choices are not always consistent and enforced (i.e date formats)”

  • “[Standard is already complex enough, but] it does not appropriately handle information specific to my dataset”

  • “The metadata structure does not easily handle non-static data sets”

  • “The technical terms and document language are difficult to read and understand”

  • “[The standard is too complex:] you have to wade through too much to get to what actually applies to a particular dataset”

  • “[Because of standard complexity,] attention to format can overtake attention to actual content”

  • “The final product is not easily understandable to the general public”

NOAA Coastal Services Center


What really makes a standard a standard

What really makes a standard a standard?

  • Endorsed by a recognized organization

  • Easily Available

  • Well documented (to prevent inconsistent use of the standard)

  • Widely used

  • Flexible / Evolving

  • Easily adoptable (to allow maximum compatibility with existing standards)

  • Guidelines for content change


What are the standards

What are the standards?

  • Data (HDF, NetCDF, ASCII)

  • Metadata

  • Format (ISO 8601 Date/Time)

  • Controlled Vocabularies / Ontology (RDF)

  • W3C Mark-up Languages (XML, HTML, XSLT)

  • Data Exchange Protocols (HTTP, FTP)

  • Metadata Exchange Protocols (OAI)

  • Web Services Protocols (OGC, SOAP)


What are the standards1

What are the standards?

  • Data (HDF, NetCDF, ASCII)

  • Metadata

  • Format (ISO 8601 Date/Time)

  • Controlled Vocabularies / Ontology (RDF)

  • W3C Mark-up Languages (XML, HTML, XSLT)

  • Data Exchange Protocols (HTTP, FTP)

  • Metadata Exchange Protocols (OAI)

  • Web Services Protocols (OGC, SOAP)


What are some of the common metadata standards

What are some of the common metadata standards?

  • 1960: ROSCOP/CSR (Cruise Summary Report)

  • 1970: MARC (Machine-Readable Cataloging)

  • 1986: Australia New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC)

  • 1988: Directory Interchange Format (DIF)

  • 1991: European Directory of Marine Environmental Datasets (EDMED)

  • 1994: Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI)

  • 1994: US Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (CSDGM)

  • 1998: Common Data Index (CDI)

  • 2001: NOAA/NODC Electronic Data Description Format (EDDF)

  • 2004: ISO-19115 Geographic Information Metadata International Standard


What are some of the common metadata standards1

What are some of the common metadata standards?

  • 1960: ROSCOP/CSR (Cruise Summary Report)

  • 1970: MARC (Machine-Readable Cataloging)

  • 1986: Australia New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC)

  • 1988: Directory Interchange Format (DIF)

  • 1991: European Directory of Marine Environmental Datasets (EDMED)

  • 1994: Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI)

  • 1994:US Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (CSDGM)

  • 1998: Common Data Index (CDI)

  • 2001: NOAA/NODC Electronic Data Description Format (EDDF)

  • 2004:ISO-19115 Geographic Information Metadata International Standard formalized


Profiles of fgdc csdgm

Profiles of FGDC CSDGM

  • 1999: Biological Data Profile of the CSDGM

  • 2001: ESRI Data Profile of the CSDGM

  • 2001: Shoreline Data Profile of the CSDGM

  • 2002: Extensions for Remote Sensing of the CSDGCM

    http://www.fgdc.gov/standards/projects/FGDC-standards-projects/


Draft profiles of iso 19115

Draft Profiles of ISO 19115

  • Imagery and Gridded Data Extension (ISO 19115-2)

  • WMO Core Metadata Standard

  • Marine Community Profile (AODC)

  • Australian Government’s Office of Spatial Data Management (OSDM) Profile

  • North American Profile for Geospatial Metadata (NAP)

    • US National Profile

    • Canada Profile

    • ESRI Profile

  • Biological Data Profile (NBII) Extension

  • CEOS IDN Community Profile of ISO 19115


Are profiles impacting interoperability

Are profiles impacting interoperability?

“Profiles consist of a selected set of metadata elements. Additional metadata elements and conditionality changes can be established.”

Source: ISO 19115:2003, Geographic Information - Metadata


Are profiles impacting interoperability1

Are profiles impacting interoperability?

StandardProfile

Broader/complex Narrower/simpler

GenericSpecific

Core ElementsCore Elements

Optional FieldsMandatory Fields

Undefined DomainsExplicit domains – extended codelists


Are profiles impacting interoperability2

Are profiles impacting interoperability?

  • Many profiles – how many is too many?

  • Draft ISO 19139 XML schema available at

    http://eden.ign.fr/xsd/isotc211

    (no official schema at this time)

  • Many interpretations of standard

  • By definition an extended document cannot conform to the ISO19139 schema!

  • Sharing outside your community becomes a challenge…


How can communities achieve maximum interoperability

How can communities achieve maximum interoperability?

  • Specific core elements and formats (i.e. ISO 8601: YYYY-MM-DD) need to be followed

  • Quality control of metadata is crucial - without validated metadata, meaningful comparisons cannot be made and may result in misrepresentation of the data

  • Tools are needed to assist with the creation of metadata record – to assure compliance

  • Not just implementation, but conformance!


What tools are available

What tools are available?

  • SMMS (Spatial Metadata Management System)

  • TKME / MP (Metadata Parser)

  • ESRI FGDC / ISO metadata editor

  • INTA ISO Metadata editor

  • IODE/MEDI

  • DocBUILDER (HTML / Standalone)

  • MATT (Metadata AuThoring Tool)


What are some common controlled vocabularies for datasets

What are some common controlled vocabularies for datasets?

  • BODC Parameter Discovery & Usage Vocabulary

  • Global Change Master Directory Keywords

  • CF Standard Names

  • AGU Index Terms

  • IOOS Core Variables

  • JGOFS Flux Study Parameters

  • U.S. GLOBEC Thesaurus

  • OBIS Taxonomic Categories


Controlled vocabularies achieving maximum semantic interoperability

Controlled vocabularies - Achieving maximum semantic interoperability

  • Guidelines & Rules for Additions, Deletions,

    and Modifications

  • Notification services for updates

  • Clear definitions of terms

  • Tools and domain experts are needed to do the vocabulary mappings - work effort is huge to fully deliver interoperability!

  • Long-term commitment to vocabularies and ontology maintenance


Questions1

Questions ?

Mélanie F. Meaux

[email protected]

NASA / GCMD


  • Login