All About Sentence Parts
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All About Sentence Parts. (and why you care). Take Notes on this:. Define “clause” Define “phrase” Define and differentiate 2 types of clauses Identify and give examples of 2 types of conjunctions Define and write examples of 3 sentence types. Clauses and Phrases.

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All About Sentence Parts

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All about sentence parts

All About Sentence Parts

(and why you care)


Take notes on this

Take Notes on this:

  • Define “clause”

  • Define “phrase”

  • Define and differentiate 2 types of clauses

  • Identify and give examples of 2 types of conjunctions

  • Define and write examples of 3 sentence types


Clauses and phrases

Clauses and Phrases

both are groups of words

A CLAUSE contains BOTH a subject and a verb

A PHRASE may contain verb(s) or noun(s) but does not have BOTH subject and verb


Clauses and phrases1

Clauses and Phrases

A CLAUSE contains BOTH a subject and a verb

A PHRASE may contain verb(s) or noun(s) but does not have BOTH subject and verb

Americans must be on time for everything

on time

for everything


Clause or phrase

Clause or Phrase?

P

walking on the shore

C

They care too much

P

Loudly called his name

C

It was

P

Americans with power

P

With yellow and red polka dots


Clauses

Clauses

Clauses are the essential building blocks of sentences

The number of clauses in a sentence determines the sentence pattern AND much of the punctuation of the sentence.


Clauses1

Clauses

The number of clauses in a sentences determines the sentence pattern AND much of the punctuation of the sentence

American must be on time for everything

1 clause

=

=

Simple sentence

must be on time for everything

Fragment

0 clause

=

=


Types of clauses

Types of Clauses

dependent

independent

Can stand alone as a sentence

Cannot stand alone as a sentence

Ex: Americans love their freedom.

Ex: because Americans love their freedom.


Dependent clauses

DependentClauses

Subordinate clauses

Relative Clauses

Start with a subordinating conjunction

Start with a relative pronoun

Ex: that, which, who

EX: because, while, although, as, so that,


Dependent or independent

Dependent or Independent ?

independent

Americans value material goods

dependent

that in some countries, tradition is more important than it is in America

who consider hard work more valuable than inheritance

dependent

independent

Time matters


Conjunctions

Conjunctions

Connect sentence parts

CoordinatingConjunctions

Subordinating Conjunctions

Although, because,

so that, if,

since

for, and,

nor, but, or,

yet, so

Connect equal parts

Connect unequal parts


Compare subordination and coordination

Compare Subordination and Coordination

Coordination

We care about our country, but we care more about individual rights

Subordination

Although we care about our country, we care more about individual rights

Subordinate clause

carries LESS grammatical weight

than independent clause

Two INDEPENDENT

clauses carry

equal grammatical weight


Sentence types

Sentence types

Simple Sentence

One independent clause

Generally,

Americans value work.

hard


Sentence types1

Sentence types

Compound

Sentence

Two (or more) independent clauses

Americans value work,

and

they value its rewards.


Sentence types2

Sentence types

One (or more) independent clause(s) and one (or more) dependent clause(s)

Complex

Sentence

Since Americans value hard work,

they also value its rewards.


Finding the subject

Finding the Subject

  • The subject of the sentence is in the INDEPENDENT CLAUSE

  • The subject of the sentence cannot be in a prepositional phrase

  • A compound sentence will have more than one subject.


Finding the subject1

Finding the Subject

S

,

  • Around my house my mother is the Queen.

,

S

,

  • When it snows we warm up her car and

  • we scrape all the snow off of it.

S


Punctuating using clauses

Punctuating Using Clauses


Punctuating using clauses1

Punctuating Using Clauses

IC +, FB + IC

CS = Compound Sentence

Good!

My mother loves us, and we love her.

Good!

IC + ; IC

CS = Compound Sentence

My mother loves us; we love her.


Punctuating using clauses2

Punctuating Using Clauses

SC = subordinate clause

Complex Sentence

CX

SC+, + IC

GOOD!

Although she is young, she is wise.

Complex Sentence

CX

IC + SC

GOOD!

She is wise although she is young


Punctuating using clauses3

Punctuating Using Clauses


Punctuating using clauses4

Punctuating Using Clauses

Words or phrases before the subject that are not PART of the subject are separated from the subject with a comma

,

S

On Labor Day we will not have class.

Even though she is working a lot, at

8:00 am she will arrive on time and ready for her class.

S

,


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