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Offer vs. Serve. CSNA – September 29, 2012. Objectives. Recognize a reimbursable lunch under the new meal pattern. Recognize a reimbursable breakfast under the traditional food-based meal plan. New Meal Pattern Review. New Lunch Meal Pattern. Fruits. Separate component from vegetables

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offer vs serve

Offer vs. Serve

CSNA – September 29, 2012

objectives
Objectives
  • Recognize a reimbursable lunch under the new meal pattern.
  • Recognize a reimbursable breakfast under the traditional food-based meal plan.
fruits
Fruits
  • Separate component from vegetables
  • Fresh, frozen w/out added sugar, dried, canned in light syrup, water, fruit juice
  • Required at lunch
  • 100% fruit juice can be credited to meet no more than ½ of the fruits component offered over the week
fruits1
Fruits
  • All fruits are credited based on their volume as served, except dried fruit
  • (1/4 cup dried = 1/2 cup fruit component)
  • Minimum creditable serving = 1/8 cup
  • Age-grade groups may not be combined, unless the minimums/maximums overlap
vegetables
Vegetables
  • Separate component from fruit
  • Fresh, frozen, canned
  • Beans/Peas (Legumes)
  • Required for lunch
  • 100% vegetable juice cannot exceed ½ total weekly vegetable offering
vegetables1
Vegetables
  • Vegetables are credited based on their volume as served,
  • exceptleafy greens (1 cup leafy = ½ cup veg. component)
  • Minimum credible serving = 1/8 cup
  • Age-grade groups may not be combined, unless the minimum/maximums overlap
grains
Grains
  • Half of grains must be whole grain rich
  • Minimum & maximum ranges
  • Grain based desserts
    • Up to two desserts/week
    • Maximum of 2 oz grains/week
    • Add to each entree choice as

additional grain contribution

grains1
Grains
  • Schools operating less than 5 days per week may decrease the weekly quantity – see USDA chart
  • - Schools may not exceed the maximums
meat meat alternates
Meat/Meat Alternates
  • Daily requirements
  • Minimum & maximum weekly requirements
  • Tofu may now be offered
meat meat alternates1
Meat/Meat Alternates
  • Schools operating less than 5 days per week may decrease the weekly quantity - refer to USDA chart
  • -Schools may not exceed the maximums
slide13
Milk
  • A variety of milk must be available:
    • Fat-Free/Skim (Unflavored or Flavored)
    • 1% (Unflavored)
    • Fat-Free or 1% Lactose Free
what is offer vs serve
What is Offer vs. Serve?
  • OVS is a provision that allows students to decline either 1 or 2 of the food items in a school lunch (or 1 food item in a school breakfast) that they do not intend to eat

As a result, OVS can help achieve two major goals:

  • To reduce food waste in school nutrition programs
  • To permit students to select only the foods they want to consume

When students are allowed to take only what they intend to eat, less food makes it into the garbage can at the end of a meal!

offer vs serve general rules
Offer vs. ServeGeneral Rules
  • Students need to take at least 3 components
  • Must be implemented

in grades 9-12 for lunch

  • Optional for all grade levels

for breakfast

benefits of offer vs serve administrators
Benefits of Offer vs. ServeAdministrators
  • Students get the nutrients they need for success in the classroom.
  • Students take less time in the school breakfast or lunch line.
  • Less food is thrown away.
  • Janitorial staff have less cleanup.
  • School systems can save money.
benefits of offer vs serve child nutrition staff
Benefits of Offer vs. ServeChild Nutrition Staff
  • More choices can be offered on the school menu.
  • School cafeteria staff may be able to make less food.
  • Fewer students may bring their lunch, so more kids eat school meals.
  • Child Nutrition has less food and packaging waste to get rid of.
  • Schools can conserve resources—food, money and energy.
benefits of offer vs serve teachers
Benefits of Offer vs. ServeTeachers
  • Students take less time in the school breakfast or lunch line.
  • Teachers do not have to monitor what students take.
  • The cafeteria can be used as a learning laboratory.
  • Students can practice nutrition lessons learned in the classroom.
  • Students can learn about ways to save resources and the environment.
benefits of offer vs serve families
Benefits of Offer vs. ServeFamilies
  • Cost savings keep school meal prices low.
  • Families can take greater advantage of school breakfast and lunch.
  • Families can teach children about food and nutrition by using the menu.
  • Families save time by not having to pack lunches.
  • Children build life skills in choosing what foods they will eat.
benefits of offer vs serve students
Benefits of Offer vs. ServeStudents
  • Students have the chance to try new foods.
  • Students eat more fruits and veggies because they pick what they like.
  • Students get the nutrients they need because they eat foods they pick.
  • Students have more time to eat because it takes less time in line.
  • Students can learn about eating smart and the environment.
lunch offer vs serve
Offer at least one serving each of:

Meat/Meat Alternate

Grains

Milk

Fruit

Vegetable

Lunch Offer vs. Serve
lunch offer vs serve1
Lunch Offer vs. Serve
  • Must take at least 3 components
  • Must take at least ½ cup fruit or vegetable
  • May take two ¼ cup servings of the same fruit or vegetable
  • May take ¼ cup fruit and ¼ cup vegetable to meet the ½ cup requirement
slide26
Lunch Grades K-8Offer vs. Serve Minimum Chosen Serving Sizes Each student may select three components
  • Full portion Meat/Meat Alternate
  • Full portion Grain
  • ½ cup Fruit
  • ½ cup Vegetable (offer ¾ cup)
  • 1 cup Milk
lunch grades k 8 without offer vs serve each student must take all components
Lunch Grades K-8WITHOUT Offer vs. Serve Each student must take ALL components
  • Full portion Meat/Meat Alternate
  • Full portion Grain
  • ½ cup Fruit
  • ¾ cup Vegetable
  • 1 cup Milk
slide28
Lunch Grades 9-12Offer vs. Serve Minimum Chosen Serving Sizes Each student may select three components
  • 2 oz. Meat/Meat Alternate
  • 2 oz. Grain
  • ½ cup Fruit (offer 1 cup)
  • ½ cup Vegetable (offer 1 cup)
  • 1 cup Milk
lunch grades 9 12 without offer vs serve each student must take all components
Lunch Grades 9-12 WITHOUT Offer vs. Serve Each student must take ALL components
  • 2 oz. Meat/Meat Alternate
  • 2 oz. Grain
  • 1 cup Fruit
  • 1 cup Vegetable
  • 1 cup Milk
lunch combination foods
Lunch Combination Foods
  • Pizza
  • Pasta w/ Meat Sauce
  • Burritos
  • Tacos
  • Sandwiches/Wraps
  • Macaroni & Cheese
offer vs serve special situation
Offer vs. Serve Special Situation
  • When a student selects only three items and two are from the fruit and vegetable components, the student must select the full required minimum portion size of one fruit or vegetable and may select the ½ cup minimum of the other.
    • Examples:
      • K-8 ½ cup vegetable + ½ cup fruit + milk
      • 9-12 ½ cup fruit + 1 cup vegetable + grain
      • 9-12 ½ cup vegetable + 1 cup fruit + meat
sample tray k 8 lunch
Sample Tray: K-8 Lunch

1 serving vegetable pizza

(2 oz. M/MA, 2 servings Grain, 1/4 c. Vegetable)

1 cup garden salad

1 fresh pear

1 cup fat-free or 1% unflavored milk

sample tray k 8 lunch1
Sample Tray: K-8 Lunch
  • 2 oz. chicken breast
  • #8 disher whipped potatoes
  • ¼ cup roasted carrots
  • 1 serving cornbread
  • ½ cup kiwi & strawberries
  • 1 cup fat-free or 1% unflavored milk
sample tray 9 12 lunch
Sample Tray: 9-12 Lunch
  • 2 oz. baked chicken
  • 1/2 cup brown rice
  • 1/2 cup roasted sweet potato wedges
  • 1 oz. whole wheat roll
  • Assorted whole fruit
  • 1 cup fat-free or 1% unflavored milk
sample tray 9 12 lunch1
Sample Tray: 9-12 Lunch
  • Fish tacos (2 oz. M/MA, 2 svgs. Grain)
  • ½ cup corn
  • Fruit & veggie bar with taco toppings (cheese, salsa, shredded romaine, diced tomatoes, onion, jalapenos)
  • 1 cup fat-free or 1% unflavored milk
breakfast offer vs serve sy 2012 13 traditional food based menu planning
Offer at least one serving each of:

½ cup fruit/juice/vegetable

½ pint of milk variety

1 serving each M/MA and grain

or

2 servings M/MA

or

2 servings grain

Breakfast Offer vs. ServeSY 2012-13: Traditional Food-based Menu Planning
breakfast offer vs serve sy 2012 13 traditional food based menu planning1
Breakfast Offer vs. Serve SY 2012-13: Traditional Food-based Menu Planning
  • Must offer 4 items:
    • ½ cup fruit/juice/vegetable
    • 1 cup of milk variety
    • 1 serving each M/MA and grain or
    • 2 servings M/MA

or

    • 2 servings grain

Students must

Select at least

3 items

breakfast combinations
Breakfast Combinations
  • 2 Grains
    • 1 serving cooked or cold cereal and 1 serving toast
    • 2 servings of pancakes
    • 2 servings of French toast
  • 2 Meat/Meat Alternates
    • One large egg
    • Omelet
    • 8 oz. yogurt
  • 1 M/MA + 1 Grain
    • Breakfast sandwich
    • Eggs and sausage
    • 1 serving toast with peanut butter
    • 4 oz. yogurt with 1 serving graham crackers
breakfast combinations1
Breakfast Combinations
  • When one food offered contains 2 of the 4 minimum menu items, the student must select the combination food and one other item
  • Examples:
    • Breakfast burrito
    • Cheese toast
    • Breakfast sandwich
    • Quesadilla
    • Toast with peanut butter
    • Yogurt & graham crackers
group activity1
Group Activity
  • Using the food models, create reimbursable meals for the following grade groups:
      • K-5
      • 6-8
      • 9-12
  • Share the reimbursable meals you created with the group.
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