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e-Learning: who is leading whom, and where might the road be going?. Sarah Nicholoson, Hamish Macleod & Jeff Haywood University of Edinburgh, UK [email protected] outline. University’s concerns with the use of computers in support of teaching & learning

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e learning who is leading whom and where might the road be going

e-Learning: who is leading whom, and where might the road be going?

Sarah Nicholoson,

Hamish Macleod &

Jeff Haywood

University of Edinburgh, UK

[email protected]

outline
outline
  • University’s concerns with the use of computers in support of teaching & learning
  • initiatives to support ICT literacy developments
  • “educating the Net Generation”
  • discussion
    • comparative experiences
      • international
      • cultural
      • disciplinary
introductions
introductions

Sarah Nicholson

VP (Representation) of the University Students’ Association

Hamish Macleod

Centre for Teaching, Learning & Assessment

Jeff Haywood

Media & Learning Technology Service

where to start
where to start?

"There is no reason anyone in the right state of mind will want a computer in their home.”Ken Olson, President of Digital Equipment Corp, 1977.

situation in the early 1990s
situation in the early 1990s

those reporting “…little or no experience …”

how do we know what we know
How do we know what we know?
  • who is leading whom?
    • a typical student?
  • where are we now?
    • what we know
    • what we don’t know
  • a framework for “effective learning”
    • student as consumer?
    • route to employment?
    • what is HE for?
  • where might the road be going?
taking this forward
taking this forward
  • support for skills acquisition
    • students
    • staff
  • a profile of development & progress
  • learning spaces; formal and informal
    • physical
    • virtual
  • assessment
    • of learning
    • for learning
    • variety & “attention span”
  • student involvement with educational innovation
    • student as consumer
    • student as consultant
the present situation
the present situation?
  • technologically literate, but pragmatic
  • distinction between confidence and competence
  • most powerful influence on technological literacy is personal and social context

“In short, institutions need to provide ample opportunity for training of students. It cannot be assumed that they come to college prepared to use advanced software applications.”Kvavik (2005)

  • skill levels easily enhanced by the imposition of appropriate academic requirements
listening to students
listening to students
  • hearing what they say
  • understanding what they mean
  • seeing their perspective
    • their position
    • their experience
  • allowing freedom of action
    • innovation
    • exploration
    • accommodating a variety of learning styles
slide16

I recently bought a new mobile phone and it was difficult to use. One of my students started to explain how to use it and I realised that I needed to learn the language of students and find out how they prefer to learn.

Eduardo Carrillo

University of Coventry, UK

slide17

Our students have changed radically. Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.

Marc Prensky (2001) Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9 (5)

slide18

“we shape our tools, and thereafter our tools shape us”

Marshall McLuhan

Co-evolution of humans and their tools

Doug Engelbart

Notions of “man-computer symbiosis”

J C R Licklidder

steven johnson 2005 everything bad is good for you how popular culture is making us smarter
Steven Johnson (2005) Everything bad is good for you: how popular culture is making us smarter.
slide21
John C Beck & Mitchell Wade (2005) Got game: how the gamer generation is reshaping business forever. Harvard Business School Press.
slide22
people who are confident with risk and surprise, who regard simulation and fantasy as a useful tool not a distraction, and who see themselves as at the heroes of their own narratives.

(Beck & Wade, 2004)

that is, personal experience translated into workplace (or academic?) advantage

the centrality of the social
the centrality of the social
  • technologies considered in terms of the actions that they afford
    • “texting” and “IMing”
  • Metcalfe’s Law; the value of the network expands exponetially as the number of users grows
    • Frand (2000) The Information Age Mindset
    • Rheingold (2003) Smart Mobs
  • Importance of the social aspects of learning
    • “Older learners tend to be less interested in the social aspects of learning; convenience & flexibility are much more important.”Oblinger & Oblinger (2005)
    • qualified acceptance of online learning; appreciate it, but want it to be blended with other, particularly direct contact, learning experiences
slide25
“…not to present a complete vision, but rather to open the eyes . . .”

Prensky (2005) speaking of the potential for educational applications of cellphone technology.

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