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Spike timing-dependent plasticity Guoqiang Bi Department of Neurobiology University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Cajal, 1894. Temporally varying patterns of input. Spatially distributed patterns of storage. ???.

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slide1
Spike timing-dependent plasticity Guoqiang Bi Department of Neurobiology University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
slide2

Cajal, 1894

Temporally varying patterns of input

Spatially distributed patterns of storage

???

slide3

When an axon of cell A is near enough to excite a cell B and repeatedly or persistently takes part in firing it, some growth process or metabolic change takes place in one or both cells such that A’s efficiency, as one of the cells firing B, is increased.

— Donald O. Hebb, 1949

slide4

“Cells that fire together, wire together”

Question:

How precise do the cells need to fire together in

order to wire together?

slide5

Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity

    • How does the timing of pre- and postsynaptic activity affect synaptic modification?
  • STDP in neuronal networks
    • How may a network change its configuration according to the temporal structure of in input stimuli?
  • Temporal integration of STDP
    • How is a synapse modified by natural spike trains?
slide8

Synaptic connectivity between cultured neurons

A. Glu - Glu

B. Glu - GABA

S1 S2

S1 S2

R1

R1

*

R2

R2

+ bicuculline

+ CNQX

+ bicuculline & CNQX

+ CNQX & bicuculline

slide9

Paired pre- and postsynaptic spiking

– a “true Hebbian” paradigm

slide13

A critical window for synaptic modification

induced by correlated spiking

Bi & Poo 1998

slide19

Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity

    • Paired pre- and postsynaptic spiking induces LTP and LTD, depending on the precise spike timing
    • STDP is sensitive to neuronal cell type
    • STDP requires NMDA receptors
  • STDP in neuronal networks
    • How may a network change its configuration according to the temporal structure of in input stimuli?
  • Temporal integration of STDP
    • How is a synapse modified by natural spike trains?
  • Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity
    • Paired pre- and postsynaptic spiking induces LTP and LTD, depending on the precise spike timing
    • STDP is sensitive to neuronal cell type
    • STDP requires NMDA receptors
  • STDP in neuronal networks
    • How may a network change its configuration according to the temporal structure of in input stimuli?
  • Temporal integration of STDP
    • How is a synapse modified by natural spike trains?
slide20

Correlated spiking at remote synapses through convergent

polysynaptic pathways – a “delay-line” mechanism

slide21

1

2

A

3

EPSC

700 pA

B

3

2

1

150 pA

S

Polysynaptic pathways in small neural networks

slide22

IPI(ms): 60 40

4

3

2

1

S

Long-term pathway remodeling induced

by repetitive paired-pulse stimulation

slide23

Sensitivity of pathway remodeling to inter-

pulse interval (IPI) of input stimuli

IPI(ms): 100 50 20

3

2

1

S

slide24

Dependence of pathway remodeling on inter-

pulse interval (IPI) of input stimuli

IPI(ms): 150 65 65 55

4

3

2

1

S

slide25

Pathway remodeling induced by

paired-pulse stimuli of different IPIs

slide26

IPI1  IPI2

IPI1  IPI2

slide27

LTP and LTD at remote synapses

induced by local paired pulse stimulation

A1

A2

B1

B2

slide28

Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity

    • Paired pre- and postsynaptic spiking induces LTP and LTD, depending on the precise spike timing
    • STDP is sensitive to neuronal cell type
    • STDP requires NMDA receptors
  • Remote STDP in neuronal networks
    • STDP occurs at synaptic sites remote to network input nodes
    • Spike timing within the network can be coordinated by delay-lines formed by polysynaptic pathways.
  • Temporal integration of STDP
  • Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity
    • Paired pre- and postsynaptic spiking induces LTP and LTD, depending on the precise spike timing
    • STDP is sensitive to neuronal cell type
    • STDP requires NMDA receptors
  • Remote STDP in neuronal networks
    • STDP occurs at synaptic sites remote to network input nodes
    • Spike timing within the network can be coordinated by delay-lines formed by polysynaptic pathways.
  • Temporal integration of STDP
slide29

Temporal integration of STDP – theoretical considerations

“Pan-spike” interaction

“Near-neighbor” interaction

slide31

LTP induced by a special case

of “triplet” spiking

A

B

Bi & Poo 1998

slide32

Temporally asymmetric interaction between

LTP- and LTD-inducing processes

slide34

Spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity

    • Paired pre- and postsynaptic spiking induces LTP and LTD, depending on the precise spike timing
    • STDP is sensitive to neuronal cell type
    • STDP requires NMDA receptors
  • Remote STDP in neuronal networks
    • STDP occurs at synaptic sites remote to network input nodes
    • Spike timing within the network can be coordinated by delay-lines formed by polysynaptic pathways.
  • Temporal integration of STDP
    • In hippocampal cultures, LTP- and LTD-inducing processes integrate asymmetrically
    • Different systems with the same spike-timing window may have different integration rules.
slide35

Acknowledgements

UC San DiegoMu-ming Poo (Berkeley)

Benedikt Berninger (Munich)

University of Pittsburgh Pakming Lau

Huaixing Wang

Joyeeta Dutta

David Nauen

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