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Canada. Presentation to First Nations Connect Conference, February 13, 2002. Jacques Drouin, Connectivity Policy Manager, Industry Canada. "Make the information and knowledge infrastructure accessible to all Canadians, thereby making Canada the most connected nation in the world.".

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Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Canada

Presentation to First Nations Connect Conference, February 13, 2002

Jacques Drouin, Connectivity Policy Manager, Industry Canada


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

"Make the information and knowledge infrastructure accessible to all Canadians, thereby making Canada the most connected nation in the world."

Speech from the Throne, 1997

Connecting CanadiansNational Vision

2


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

We Are Now in the Network Age

  • "Today's technological transformations are intertwined with another transformation - globalization - and together they are creating a new paradigm: the network age.”

    United Nations Human Development Report, July 2001

  • Instant access to knowledge

  • Transforming business

  • Borderless, global economies

  • New ways of citizen - government engagement

3


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

A Six Part Agenda Established

  • Canada Online

  • Smart Communities

  • Canadian Content Online

  • Electronic Commerce

  • Canadian Governments Online, and

  • Connecting Canada to the World

4


Canada online ensuring access for all canadians www connect gc ca

Canada Online:Ensuring Access for All Canadianswww.connect.gc.ca

  • First country in the world to connect all schools & libraries

  • Over 300,000 computers delivered to schools

  • 8,800 Community AccessSites

  • 11,000 voluntary organizations connected


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Change 1990-00 (000s)

Level 2000 (000s)

High School

Diploma

Post

-

secondary

Diploma or Degree

7,777

+2,455

Less than High

School

140

120

+363

4,616

100

80

-993

-

2,517

60

90

91

92

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

00

Index (1990=100)

Education & Skills For Jobs and Growth

Employment Growth by Highest Level of Education Attained 1990-2000

Digital literacy critical in the Network Age

6


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

By Education

By Income

Percent of households, 2000

Percent of households, 2000

79

78

61

55

43

24

22

Less than HighSchool

University Degree

High School or College

<$20,000

$20,001 -

$36,000 -

>$60,000

$35,999

$59,999

Digital Divide Still Exists

Internet Use from Any Location

Must increase efforts to ensure that no Canadians are left behind

Source: Household Internet Use Survey; Statistics Canada, 2001

7


Smart communities http smartcommunities ic gc ca

Smart Communitieshttp://smartcommunities.ic.gc.ca

Yellowknife

Labrador

Northern

Saskatchewan

Calgary

Péninsule Acadienne +

Shawinigan +

Coquitlam +

Charlottetown +

Sioux Lookout

Brandon +

Annapolis +

Ottawa

$60M Government Commitment

…New Model for Community Development

8


Canadian content online http collections ic gc ca

Canadian Content Onlinehttp://collections.ic.gc.ca

$108M to bringCanadian cultureinto the Digital Age

9


Electronic commerce www e com ic gc ca

Electronic Commercewww.e-com.ic.gc.ca

250

E-Commerce in Canada

$ Billions

200

B2B

150

100

50

B2C

0

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Source: Internet Commerce in Canada, IDC 2001

  • PKI

  • Consumer Protection

  • Privacy

  • Digital Signatures

  • Intellectual Property

  • Security / Encryption

  • Standards

  • Tax Neutrality

“The real story is about the e-transformation of traditional businesses”

The OECD Observer, September 25, 2001

10


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Canadian Governments Online

www.canada.gc.ca

"By 2004, our goal is to be known aroundthe world as the government most connectedto its citizens."

Speech From the Throne, 1999

Overall Maturity*

Client-centric – Integrated – Interactive – E-Com enabled

Source: Accenture, April 2001

11


Canadians are receptive to government online services

Canadians Are Receptive to Government Online Services

Millions

Percent

6.0

5.8

6

30

5.5

5.1

4.9

5

25

27.3

4.5

26.4

25.5

24.1

3.9

23.4

4

20

21.8

3.2

19.4

3

15

15.8

2

10

1

5

0

0

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

% of Total Tax Returns Filed (Right Axis)

Number of Returns E-Filed (Left Axis)

Source: Canada Customs and Revenue Agency; October 2001.

Tax returns filed electronicallyin Canada

12


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Tele-working

Videoconferencing

Tele or E-Learning

Tele-medicine

Video Telephony

Near VoD

Movies-on-demand

Audio-on-demand

Telegames

Home Shopping

Electronic Banking

Elect. Newspaper

Digital TV

1.5 Mbps

10

100

1000

10000

Kilobits/second

Basic Connectivity No Longer Sufficient

Source: PlannedapproachInc.com

13


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Inclusive Society

Innovative Economy

Skilled &

Empowered Citizens

Increased

Competitiveness

Knowledge Networks

Broadband IS the Platform

Broadband

14


What can broadband deliver

What Can Broadband Deliver?

  • Increasing volumes of content and services

  • Virtual face-to-face interaction

  • Substantially improved existing services and creation of innovative and bandwidth-intensive ones:

    • E-Learning- learning anywhere, anytime

    • Tele-health-saving lives and money through networking

    • E-com-supportingnew ways of doing business

    • E-research- exponential improvements in research capacity

    • E-government- fully engaging all citizens

Allows ALL Canadians, wherever they are, to participate in the Innovation Agenda

15


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

U.S. Economic Study Agrees

The $500 Billion Opportunity: The Potential Economic Benefit of Widespread Diffusion of Broadband Internet Access

Crandall and Jackson, July 2001

  • An attempt to look at what life could be like with ubiquitous broadband access

  • Study identified five sources of benefit:

    • Telecommuting

    • Entertainment

    • Telemedicine

    • Telephony

    • Home On-line shopping

  • Widespread use of broadband could contribute between $200B and $500B annually to U.S. economy by 2025

16


Global race to get competitive advantage through broadband

Global Race to Get Competitive Advantage Through Broadband

SwedenC$1.24B

Goal: Universal broadband access by 2005

Focus on underserved locations & groups (30% pop.)

$765M for transport; $480M for municipal nets and tax relief

U.S.C$3.35B/year

Goal: extend universal service to include advanced services. Multiple federal, state and local programs: e.g., $3.2B/year for statutory E-rate program, 153M/year for Rural Broadband Loan Program pilot project. Nearly 40 bills before Congress to accelerate broadband in rural and underserved areas.

France

C$2.2B

Goal: Universal broadband access by 2005

Focus on underserved, rural locations (20 to 25% of pop.)

$300M direct for infrastructure & deployment; $1.9B in government funded loans for infrastructure deployment.

U.K.

Not yet funded

Universal broadband access by 2005

Program announcement anticipated

17


Global race to get competitive advantage through broadband1

Global Race to Get Competitive Advantage Through Broadband

Germany

C$1.1B

Goal: Leadership in EU Information Society

Broadband from ADSL to 8 Mbps Target 2006

Goal: World IT leadership by 2005.

“Ultra high speed” goal of 30 Mbps to 30 million homes. $41M seed funding sought 2002; full funding announcement expected shortly.

JAPANNot yet funded

Korea

C$25B

(1997-2002)

Goal: World IT leadership

Broadband by 2002; Total Korea Information Infrastructure

investment $47B to 2005.

“The information society is and will remain a top priority for the EU. It can foster economic growth, provide jobs, connect remote places to urban centres and raise living standards. This has not changed.”

EC Commissioner, Erkki Liikanen, Sept 28, 2001

18


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Canada Well Positioned

High-speed Internet Users per 100 inhabitants

19

Source: OECD, 2001


But canada faces unique geographic challenges

But Canada Faces Unique Geographic Challenges

Netherlands

Japan

United Kingdom

Germany

Italy

Switzerland

Denmark

France

Ireland

United States

Sweden

Canada

Australia

0

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

Population per square mile

Population DensitiesOECD Nations

  • Relative to other countries Canada has low population density

  • Rural/remote areas unlikely to be served by market forces, as business case non-existent

Rural, remote

and north at risk!

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1992, Tables 25, 340 and 1359

20


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Majority of Canadian communities do not have access to high-speed service

Canadian Communities* 5,984

Both DSL

and Cable

4,781

Communities

22.3 % of pop.

5%

No High

Only DSL

1,203 communities 77.7 % of pop.

Speed

10%

Service

79%

Only Cable

6%

*Communities refer to Statistics Canada Census Sub-division (CSD) breakdown.

Source: Industry Canada estimates based on 1996 population data from STC and confidential company information.

21


Smaller communities most at risk

Smaller Communities Most at Risk

Unserved Communities By Size

(4781 Communities*)

92%

100%

90%

79%

76%

80%

70%

60%

50%

% of Community Size Group

50%

40%

22%

30%

20%

10%

0%

0%

0-1,000

1,000-5,000

5,000-10,000

10,000-100,000

100,000 +

Canada

0

3 230

1 309

163

79

4 781

# of communities

% of population

4.0%

9.4%

3.9%

5.0%

0

22.3%

* Communities refer to Statistics Canada Census Sub-divisions (CSDs)

Source: Industry Canada estimates based on 1996 population data from STC and confidential company information.

22


Access to high speed service varies by province

Access to High-Speed Service Varies by Province

Access to High-Speed Service

1,203 Communities*

*:Communities refer to Statistics Canada Census Sub-division (CSD) breakdown.

Source: Industry Canada estimates based on 1996 population data from STC and confidential company information.


Should rural canada have the same opportunities as urban canada

Should Rural Canada Have the Same Opportunities as Urban Canada?

  • Economic viability and sustainability in question for many rural and remote communities

    • Businesses leave

    • Jobs leave

    • Youth leave

  • Needs are greatest where services less available or not available

“Without innovative public policy, these technologies could become a source of exclusion, not a tool of progress.”

United Nations Development Report, July 2001

24


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Government is Committed to Equal Access for ALL Canadians

Established National Broadband Task Force

Mandate:

  • the need and characteristics of communities not likely to gain access to high-speed services by 2004

  • the technical, institutional and financial barriers which could delay provision of services by the private sector

  • the roles governments might play in overcoming these barriers

    Membership:

  • Leading Canadians from all sectors:

    • Industry (telcos, cablecos, service providers, content providers)

    • Public interest

    • Education and libraries

    • Health

    • Aboriginal

25


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

National Broadband Task Force’s Response

www.broadband.gc.ca

  • Essential that ALL Canadians have access

  • Make it equitable and affordable

  • Ensure balanced public-private partnership

  • Understand it is more than infrastructure that is required (encourage use and content development)

  • Place highest priority on First Nations, rural and remote

  • Called for total investment of $4.6B by ALL PARTNERS (federal, provincial, territorial, municipal governments, and private sector)

    • Community Champion seed funding to all unserved communities ($50 to $70M)

    • Transport to unserved communities ($1.3B to $1.9B)

    • Connect public institutions in unserved communities ($500M to $600M)

    • “Last mile” to homes within unserved communities ($2B)

26


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Wide Partnership Required

e-health

e-content

e-learning

Broadband

Platform

e-business

e-government

27


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Budget 2001

  • Continuing Support for Connectedness Agenda

    • SchoolNet and CAP - $40M per year for two years

    • $35M/year for the three years to support broadband expansion

    • $110M to build CA*net 4 – the next generation Internet broadband backbone

    • $600M over next four years to implement GOL strategy by 2005

    • Commitment to vision of broadband connectivity to all communities – timeline extended to 2005

… The Challenge Continues

28


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Canada

Connecting Canadians

Canada’s Innovation Strategy White Paper

What does innovation mean?

It means:

- Coming up with new ideas about how to do things better or faster 

- Making a new product or offering a new service 

- Putting new ideas to work…and having skilled people to apply them 

- Agressively pursuing new markets for Canada ’s products and services


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Canada

Connecting Canadians

Canada’s Innovation Strategy White Paper

Communities seen as incubators of innovation

But tey have to be part of the globally connected world

Broadband connectivity is an enabler of innovation

Government will work together to strenghten the capacity of communities to become incubators of innovations

Goal: by 2005, ensure that broadband is available to Canadian communities


Presentation to first nations connect conference february 13 2002

Canada

Connecting CanadiansFor Further Information

Industry Canada

www.ic.gc.ca

Connecting Canadians

www.connect.gc.ca

Strategis

www.strategis.gc.ca

Electronic Commerce

www.e-com.ic.gc.ca

National Broadband Task Force

www.broadband.gc.ca


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