Spotting patterns
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Spotting patterns. Write for 3 minutes about what you think the storyline is behind the words. Silently Read the list of words. Spotting patterns. Discuss for 4 minutes about what you think the storyline is behind the words. Discuss with your shoulder partner what you wrote.

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Spotting patterns

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Spotting patterns

Spotting patterns

Write for 3 minutes about what you think the storyline is behind the words.

Silently Read the list of words


Spotting patterns1

Spotting patterns

Discuss for 4 minutes about what you think the storyline is behind the words.

Discuss with your shoulder partner what you wrote


Spotting patterns2

Spotting patterns

Now that you have discussed it with a friend, write for 5 minutes about what you think the storyline is behind the words.

After discussing…


Spotting patterns3

Spotting patterns

1. What do these words have in common?

2. Link two words…what mood is suggested?

3. What do the repetition of words mean?

4. Work in partners to find patterns and discuss.

Highlight 5 words that stand out


Breeches

breeches


Claret

claret


Cobble

Cobble


Galleon

galleon


Spotting patterns

moor


Ostler

ostler


Plaiting

plaiting


Rapier

rapier


Torrent

torrent


Spotting patterns

SIFT Method for

Analyzing Literature

S – SYMBOL

An object, person, or place that

has meaning within itself but

stands for something else in the

context of the story

I – IMAGERY

When an image is evoked

through the use of really

descriptive language

F – FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

Includes (but is not limited to)

simile, metaphor, hyperbole,

repetition, alliteration, etc.

T – TONE AND THEME

Tone is the attitude an author

takes on the subject he/she is

writing about

Theme = Plot + Tone

Read part one and draw pictures of what you visualize each stanza to be about. Leave some room to mark up the text!

The Highwayman

by Alfred Noyes


Spotting patterns

SIFT Method for

Analyzing Literature

S – SYMBOL

An object, person, or place that

has meaning within itself but

stands for something else in the

context of the story

I – IMAGERY

When an image is evoked

through the use of really

descriptive language

F – FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

Includes (but is not limited to)

simile, metaphor, hyperbole,

repetition, alliteration, etc.

T – TONE AND THEME

Tone is the attitude an author

takes on the subject he/she is

writing about

Theme = Plot + Tone

Make a prediction…how do you think the poem will end?

The Highwayman

by Alfred Noyes


Homework

homework

  • Please get out reflection poem and let me see what you did last night.

  • Write the following in your agenda: Study woman’s suffrage vocabulary and complete reflection poem.


Spotting patterns

SIFT Method for

Analyzing Literature

S – SYMBOL

An object, person, or place that

has meaning within itself but

stands for something else in the

context of the story

I – IMAGERY

When an image is evoked

through the use of really

descriptive language

F – FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

Includes (but is not limited to)

simile, metaphor, hyperbole,

repetition, alliteration, etc.

T – TONE AND THEME

Tone is the attitude an author

takes on the subject he/she is

writing about

Theme = Plot + Tone

Read part two and draw pictures of what you visualize each stanza to be about. Leave some room to mark up the text!

The Highwayman

by Alfred Noyes


Spotting patterns

SIFT Method for

Analyzing Literature

S – SYMBOL

An object, person, or place that

has meaning within itself but

stands for something else in the

context of the story

I – IMAGERY

When an image is evoked

through the use of really

descriptive language

F – FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

Includes (but is not limited to)

simile, metaphor, hyperbole,

repetition, alliteration, etc.

T – TONE AND THEME

Tone is the attitude an author

takes on the subject he/she is

writing about

Theme = Plot + Tone

Read the poem with me and watch how I mark up the first stanza.

Read part one and annotate in the margins examples of symbols, imagery, figurative language, and tone and theme.

The Highwayman

by Alfred Noyes


Spotting patterns

Identify the metaphors in this stanza.

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor, And the highwayman came riding— Riding—riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.


Spotting patterns

What words did the author use to describe a mysterious and eerie mood?

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor, And the highwayman came riding— Riding—riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.


Spotting patterns

Can you picture a mysterious and eerie mood from these words?

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor, And the highwayman came riding— Riding—riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.


Spotting patterns

Rewrite this stanza to make the mood cheerful. Change all the words in red…

The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor, And the highwayman came riding— Riding—riding— The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn-door.


Spotting patterns

Identify the similes in this stanza.

And dark in the dark old inn-yard a stable-wicket creaked Where Tim the ostler listened; his face was white and peaked; His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like moldy hay, But he loved the landlord's daughter, The landlord's red-lipped daughter, Dumb as a dog he listened, and he heard the robber say—


Spotting patterns

Identify the similes in this stanza.

He rose upright in the stirrups; he scarce could reach her hand, But she loosened her hair i' the casement! His face burnt like a brand As the black cascade of perfume came tumbling over his breast; And he kissed its waves in the moonlight, (Oh, sweet, black waves in the moonlight!) Then he tugged at his rein in the moonlight, and galloped away to the West.


Spotting patterns

Identify the personificationin this stanza.

They said no word to the landlord, they drank his ale instead, But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed; Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets at their side! There was death at every window; And hell at one dark window; For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride.


Spotting patterns

Identify the alliterationin this stanza.

They had tied her up to attention, with many a sniggering jest; They had bound a musket beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast! 'Now, keep good watch!' and they kissed her. She heard the dead man say— Look for me by moonlight; Watch for me by moonlight; I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way!


Spotting patterns

Identify the onomatopoeiain this stanza.

Tlot-tlot; tlot-tlot! Had they heard it? The horse-hoofs ringing clear; Tlot-tlot, tlot-tlot, in the distance? Were they deaf that they did not hear? Down the ribbon of moonlight, over the brow of the hill, The highwayman came riding, Riding, riding! The redcoats looked to their priming! She stood up, straight and still!


Spotting patterns

Identify the similein this stanza.

Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky, With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high! Blood-red were his spurs i' the golden noon; wine-red was his velvet coat, When they shot him down on the highway, Down like a dog on the highway, And he lay in his blood on the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.


What do you notice about the two stanzas

What do you notice about the two stanzas?

  • Stanza 3

  • Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard,

  • And he tapped with his whip on the shutters; but all was locked and barred;

  • He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there

  • But the landlord’s black-eyed daughter.

  • Bess, the landlord’s daughter,

  • Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.

  • Stanza 17

  • Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard,

  • And he taps with his whip on the shutters; but all is locked and barred;

  • He whistles a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there

  • But the landlord’s black-eyed daughter.

  • Bess, the landlord’s daughter,

  • Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.

What is significant about this change? How does it affect the meaning?


The highwayman by alfred noyes

Richard "Dick" Turpin (bap. 1705 – 7 April 1739) was an English highwayman whose exploits were romanticized following his execution in York for horse theft. Turpin may have followed his father's profession as a butcher early in life, but by the early 1730s he had joined a gang of deer thieves, and later became a poacher, burglar, horse thief and murderer.

Plot

The poem, set in 18th century England, tells the story of an unnamed highwayman based on Dick Turpin who is in love with Bess, a landlord's (innkeeper) daughter. Betrayed to the authorities by Tim, an ostler (stableman), the highwayman escapes ambush when Bess sacrifices her life to warn him. Learning of her death he dies himself in a futile attempt at revenge, shot down on the highway. In the final stanza, the ghosts of the lovers meet again on winter nights.

The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes


The highwayman by alfred noyes1

Background

The poem was written on the edge of a desolate stretch of land in West Surrey known as Bagshot Heath, where Noyes, then aged 24, had taken rooms in a cottage. In his autobiography, he recalled: "Bagshot Heath in those days was a wild bit of country, all heather and pinewoods. 'The Highwayman' suggested itself to me one blustery night when the sound of the wind in the pines gave me the first line." The poem was completed in about two days.

The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes


Spotting patterns

Listen to the poem being read and see if some of the lines make more sense to you.

http://vimeo.com/5285061

http://vimeo.com/42539690

http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=35635

1880-1958

Alfred Noyes


Spotting patterns

Alfred Noyes uses effective word choice to create vivid characters! Complete the worksheet to describe a character, setting, and dramatic point in the poem in order to analyze his use of word choice.


Analyzing mood quiz grade

Analyzing mood—Quiz Grade

Analyze the mood which Noyes creates with his use of words in one of the stanzas. Effectively change the mood to reflect a different mood choice.


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