Enhancements 2010 2011
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Enhancements – 2010-2011. Dr. Rochelle Sturtevant NOAA GLSGN and GLERL for the Great Lakes Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species May 17, 2011. Acknowledgements. David Reid, NOAA GLERL Emeritus Ed Rutherford, NOAA GLERL PI Abigail Fusaro , NOAA Research Associate

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Enhancements – 2010-2011

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Enhancements 2010 2011

Enhancements – 2010-2011

Dr. Rochelle Sturtevant

NOAA GLSGN and GLERL

for the

Great Lakes Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species

May 17, 2011


Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

  • David Reid, NOAA GLERL Emeritus

  • Ed Rutherford, NOAA GLERL PI

  • Abigail Fusaro, NOAA Research Associate

  • Pat Charlebois, IL-IN Sea Grant

  • Emily Baker, CILER, U-MI

  • Julie Larson, CILER, U-MI

  • Kate Thompson, CILER, U-MN

  • Kyle Dettloff, CILER

  • Gabriela Nunez, CILER

  • Expert Review Panel – Tony Ricciardi, Hugh MacIsaac, Eugene Stoermer, Pat Chow-Fraser, Sarah Bailey, Hunter Carrick, Susan Galatowitsch, Jeff Gunderson, Rex Lowe, Nicholas Mandrak, Robin Scribailo


Glri enhancements

GLRI Enhancements

  • Addition of ‘range expansion’ species – those native to one portion of the Great Lakes but which are considered invasive to other portions of the basin. LIST COMPLETE and OUT FOR REVIEW. Fact Sheets Summer 2011.

  • Addition of high priority ‘watchlist’ species – those which have been identified in the literature as high risk for invading and becoming established in the Great Lakes. LIST PUBLISHED on GLANSIS.Fact Sheets Summer 2011.

  • Updated and consistent 'impact' information, especially potential impacts, better able to risk assessment. FAUNA COMPLETE and OUT FOR REVIEW. Microorganisms and plants summer 2011.

  • Enhanced bibliographic information. Summer 2011.

  • Addition of 50 non-technical fact sheets for priority species of public interest. In progress.

  • Addition of management information — regulations, best management practices and control methodologies – for all the species in the database. Fall 2011-Spring 2012.


New glansis species coming soon

New GLANSIS SpeciesComing soon…

Phragmitesaustralis

(invasive lineages)

Procambarusclarkii

Red Swamp Crayfish


Range expansion species list draft 41 species

Range Expansion Species ListDRAFT = 41 species

  • 4 fish currently included in GLANSIS will be moved to the range expansion list – sea lamprey, alewife, margined madtom, orangespotted sunfish

  • 14 algae and 5 diseases are also being considered for removal from GLANSIS to the Range Expansion List

  • 14 additional fish, 1 crayfish, 2 algae, and 1 plant are also being added to the Range Expansion list


Watch list 53 species

Watch List53 species

Ballast = 75%

Ponto-Caspian = 65%


Organism impact assessments 1386 questions what we don t know

Organism Impact Assessments(1386 questions)What we DON’T know!


Assessments for 77 species what we don t know

Assessments for 77 species What we DON’T know!

For 78% of species, data was insufficient for assessment


Organism impact assessments what we do know

Organism Impact AssessmentsWhat we DO know!

At least 17% of fauna species show a high environmental impact


Organism impact assessments what we do know1

Organism Impact AssessmentsWhat we DO know!

  • Alewife was the only species to be rated high impact on all 3 subassessments

  • Sea lamprey, zebra mussels, quagga mussels and round goby were rated high for environmental and socioeconomic impact and low for beneficial impact

  • Mud Bithynia (faucet snail) was rated high for environmental impact, moderate for socio-economic impact and low for beneficial impact

  • Spiny and fishhook waterfleaswere rated high for environmental impact and low for socio-economic and beneficial impacts

  • White perch was rated high for environmental and beneficial impacts and moderate for socioeconomic impact

  • Common carp and rainbow smelt were rated high for environmental and beneficial impacts and unknown for socioeconomic impact

  • Rainbow trout and brown trout were rated high for environmental and beneficial impacts and low for socioeconomic impact


Organism impact assessment what we do know

Organism Impact AssessmentWhat we DO know!

  • Chinook and coho salmon were rated high for benefit, moderate for environmental impact and low for socioeconomic impact

  • Only two species – suckermouth minnow and green floater – were confirmed as low impact on all three subassessments

  • Redear sunfish were rated moderate for environmental impacts and benefits and low for socioeconomic impacts.


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