A critical eye
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A Critical Eye. Kristine Stout Ed 617. Language Arts. A Critical Eye. Social Studies. Mathematics. Technology. Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

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A Critical Eye

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A critical eye

ACritical Eye

Kristine Stout

Ed 617


A critical eye

Language Arts

A Critical Eye

Social Studies

Mathematics

Technology


Established goals grade 7 standards reading

  • Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

    Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

Established Goals:Grade 7 Standards Reading


Established goals grade 7 standards writing

  • Writing Standards: Common Core Grade 7.9b; Research to Build and Present Knowledge

    Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

    b. Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. “Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims”).

Established Goals:Grade 7 Standards Writing


Established goals grade 7 standards mathematics

  • Mathematical Practices Grade 7-3

    Construct viable arguments and critique reasoning of others.

Established Goals:Grade 7 Standards Mathematics


Established goals grade 7 standards social studies

  • Social Studies Standard C; A student should develop the skills and processes of historical inquiry.

    2) use historical data from a variety of primary resources, including letters, diaries, oral accounts, archeological sites and artifacts, art, maps, photos, historical sites, documents, and secondary research materials, including almanacs, books, indices, and newspapers

Established Goals:Grade 7 Standards Social Studies


Established goals grade 7 standards technology

  • Technology Research and Information Fluency

    Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.

    a. Plan strategies to guide inquiry

    b. Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media

    c. Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks

    d. Process data and report results

Established Goals:Grade 7 Standards Technology


Essential understandings students will understand that

  • There are many ways that information can be explained and interpreted.

  • You have a responsibility to apply a critical eye when reading informational text; whether they are written documentation, data, or experiments.

  • Writing all has biases and limitations.

  • Information can be manipulated.

Essential Understandings:Students will understand that…


Essential questions

  • Are there more efficient and effective ways to explain this information?

  • Do I have any questions after reviewing the information? Is there anything that doesn’t make sense?

  • What biases might the author have? Are their biases demonstrated in the text?

  • Where else can I find information to validate what I see here?

Essential Questions:


Students will know

  • …the following 6 logical fallacies: overgeneralizations. Circular reasoning, either-or fallacy, cause and effect fallacy, loaded language, and bandwagon

  • …what types of graphs exist and when to use them

  • …what data misrepresentation looks like

  • …the following ways to evaluate text for bias: authority, accuracy, objectivity, technical and visual appeal, currency, appropriateness, and completeness

  • …what primary and secondary resources are

Students will know…


Students will be able to

  • … recognize fallacies in reasoning

  • … look for misrepresented data in graphs

  • … recognize the biases in texts

  • … access and assess primary and secondary resources

  • …evaluate online resources for appropriateness

  • …critically review informational text

  • …explain their reasoning for why and how they feel the resource could have been designed to be a more effective communication of the information

Students will be able to…


Primary performance task

Class will apply the concepts to Generation studies of the Linkster Generation and the Baby Boomers.

  • Informational text review in a selected subject area that contains at least two elements of the following:

    • Fallacy analysis

    • Bias analysis

    • Data graphics analysis

  • Group analysis and presentation on their findings using their Critical Eye

Primary Performance Task


Other performance tasks

Class will apply the concepts to Generation studies of Generation Tech and the Baby Boomers.

In class lesson assignments that develop the skills to do the primary performance task.

Language Arts

  • Week 1: Visitor and reflection, Individual fallacy homework, Group fallacy presentation

  • Week 2: Fallacy analysis of LinksterGeneration stations, Subject approval paperwork

    Social Studies

  • Week 1: Primary v. secondary resources debate, Internet research on bias (1 site and 1 article analyses)

  • Week 2: Bias analysis of a historical Baby Boomer Generation documents

    Math

  • Week 1: Individual graphing worksheet, Group graphing misrepresentation project

  • Week 2: Generation data review and reflection

    Project journaling throughout.

Other Performance Tasks


Timeline

Timeline


Lesson 1 kwl

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Discussion used to begin and end the unit with some ideas about prior knowledge, what they would like to learn, and what they learned in the end.

  • Class KWL chart

  • Individual reflections

  • Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Writing Standards: Common Core Grade 7.9b; Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • Mathematical Practices Grade 7-3

  • Social Studies Standard C; A student should develop the skills and processes of historical inquiry.

  • Technology Research and Information Fluency

  • Chart board

  • Markers

  • Reflection journals

  • Pencils

  • 3 minute initial reflection journaling time

  • 5 minute unit review

  • 15 minute class discussion

  • 3 minute post discussion reflection journaling time

  • 5 minute unit expectations

  • A new unit

Lesson 1: KWL


Lesson 1 continued kwl

Teaching/modeling (Day 1 of unit)

Group practice

Independent practice

Struggling students

Closure (Last day of unit)

Advanced students

  • Guidance of the KWL model

  • Explain the unit “A Critical Eye” – English, Social Studies, and Math; expectations in the unit

  • Class discussion about knowledge and what they want to know about.

  • Students will do an initial reflection on the statement: When I hear the phrase “using a critical eye” it makes me think of…

  • Students will do an post-discussion reflection on the statement: After our discussion I learned some new ways my classmates thought of the phrase “using a critical eye”, they were…

  • End of unit reflection on what they learned in the unit, their favorite parts of the units, what was most challenging, and how I can make the unit better for the future students.

  • The KWL and independent reflections help to guide teacher instruction for students who are beginning with varying levels of prior knowledge.

  • We sit down an discuss as a group what we learned in the unit as a whole.

  • The KWL and independent reflections help to guide teacher instruction for students who are beginning with varying levels of prior knowledge.

Lesson 1 continued: KWL


Lesson 2 fallacies

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Students learn about the 6 logical fallacies: overgeneralizations, circular reasoning, either-or fallacy, cause and effect fallacy, loaded language, and bandwagon

  • Fallacy partner stations graphic organizer

  • Fallacy group presentation

  • Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Writing Standards: Common Core Grade 7.9b; Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • Presentation of fallacies (attached to unit)

  • Graphic organizers printed (attached to unit)

  • Examples of fallacies for partners to review at stations

  • Materials for students to create a presentation (poster paper, markers, etc.)

  • Day 1: Fallacy lesson (15 minutes)

    Fallacy partner stations (20 minutes)

  • Day 2: Fallacy group presentation design day

  • Day 3:Fallacy group presentations

    Journaling (3 minutes)

  • Station work with a partner and presentation

Lesson 2: Fallacies


Lesson 2 continued fallacies

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced Students

  • Presentation of fallacies

  • Fallacy stations with a partner using the graphic organizer and presentation to determine the fallacies they see in the different documents, resources, etc.

  • Presentations by groups and journal reflection on fallacies

  • Graphic organizer and rubric give some guidance

  • Presentation of fallacy as a group using the rubric to guide their direction, but leaving flexibility for what is in the presentation

  • Flexibility to present the material in a variety of ways, be creative

Lesson 2 continued: Fallacies


Lesson 3 primary v secondary resources

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Student will discover what primary and secondary resources are and the benefits of each type of resource.

  • Class Clicker Quiz

  • Primary and secondary resource debate in small groups

  • Social Studies Standard C; A student should develop the skills and processes of historical inquiry.

  • Clickers

  • Presentation (attached to unit)

  • Paper and pencils

  • Multiple resources in the classroom that are primary and secondary resources for students to identify

  • Day 1: Primary and secondary lesson (10 minutes)

    Clicker Quiz (10 minutes)

    Debate team group work (20 minutes)

  • Day 2: Primary and secondary resource debates

  • Debate and small group work

Lesson 3: Primary v. Secondary Resources


Lesson 3 continued primary v secondary resources

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced students

  • Presentation of primary and secondary resources

  • Clicker quiz

  • Debates and the journal reflection on the debates

  • Opportunity to do hands on work in the lesson, use technology and work in teams

  • Small group debate on primary v. secondary resources

  • Opportunity to lead discussions in teams and debate

Lesson 3 continued: Primary v. Secondary Resources


Lesson 4 bias

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • the following ways to evaluate text for bias: authority, accuracy, objectivity, technical and visual appeal, currency, appropriateness, and completeness

  • Classroom journaling

  • Classroom document review – follow along

  • Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Technology Research and Information Fluency

  • Presentation

  • Copies of the bias research sheet

  • Presentation (15 minutes)

  • Document review (25 minutes)

  • Journaling (3 minutes)

  • Getting to analyze a document as a class

Lesson 4: Bias


Lesson 4 continued bias

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced students

  • Review of bias components and then classroom will work as a team to identify bias in a sample website and a sample text.

  • Journaling

  • Tomorrow they will apply what they learned today when at the library

  • Opportunity to follow along in the process they will do in greater detail as the unit develops

  • Working together to identify bias in a document.

  • Opportunity to dig deep into documents and be critical

Lesson 4 continued: Bias


Lesson 5 bias research

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Application of fallacy and bias knowledge to Linkster Generation and Baby Boomer resources.

  • At least one website and one article/paper review using the bias research sheet

  • Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Writing Standards: Common Core Grade 7.9b; Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • Social Studies Standard C; A student should develop the skills and processes of historical inquiry.

  • Copies of the bias research sheet

  • Partner research (25 minutes)

  • Journaling (3 min)

  • Share (10 min)

  • Library research, out of class and doing something different

Lesson 5: Bias Research


Lesson 5 continued bias research

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced students

  • Modeled yesterday

  • Journal reflection

  • Share some of the things they found with the class

  • Had a full model of the process the previous day

  • Partner work with the bias research sheets

  • Get to dive into research and find articles/sites they want to look at for bias. Can do more than two to get extra practice.

Lesson 5 continued: Bias Research


Lesson 6 graphing do s and don ts

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Students will learn about what types of graphs exist and when to use them

  • Reflection worksheet with bad graphs

  • Mathematical Practices Grade 7-3

  • Presentation

  • Worksheet

  • Presentation (20 minutes)

  • Worksheet time (15 minutes)

  • Get to be critical and see crazy graphs that have been made

Lesson 6: Graphing do’s and don’ts


Lesson 6 continued graphing do s and don ts

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced students

  • During presentation we look at lots of different graphs and analyze them based on the “Show me the numbers” text

  • Worksheet

  • What they get to do tomorrow in the misrepresentation of data lesson

  • Opportunity to look at the variety of graphs and have some class discussion about them, revision of types of graphs to remind them

  • Group discussions within the presentation

  • Chance to write some criticisms of graphs

Lesson 6 continued: Graphing do’s and don’ts


Lesson 7 misrepresentation of data

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Students play with what data misrepresentation looks like.

  • Group project displaying data in a variety of ways, what did they do to make the data appear in different ways?

  • Mathematical Practices Grade 7-3

  • Markers

  • Poster paper

  • Calculators

  • Rulers

  • Day 1

    • Data collection – class survey (5 minutes at end of previous class)

    • Modeling (5 minutes)

    • Group works on data (30 minutes)

  • Day 2

    • Presentation of data displays, explain how they made the data seem different and which is best in their opinion.

    • Journaling (3 min)

  • Using techniques we learned in the do’s and don’ts of graphing to present data in different ways.

Lesson 7: Misrepresentation of data


Lesson 7 continued misrepresentation of data

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced students

  • Modeling of the process of taking the survey data and creating percentages and tables to then make graphs from.

  • Journaling at the end of the lesson

  • Presenting and journaling

  • Modeling and hands on opportunities.

  • Group project that allows them to take results from survey of class and present it in different ways, good and bad, then presenting it back to the class they explain what was good and bad about the different ways they presented the data.

  • Manipulation of data presentation.

Lesson 7 continued: Misrepresentation of data


Lesson 8 critical review writing

Summary

Assessment

Standards

Materials

Time estimate

Anticipatory

  • Using knowledge of fallacies, biases, and graphing to write critical reviews of resources.

  • Critical review application in language arts, social studies, and mathematics in days to follow.

  • Reading standards for Informational Text: Common Core Grade 7.8; Integration of Knowledge and Ideas

  • Writing Standards: Common Core Grade 7.9b; Research to Build and Present Knowledge

  • Presentation

  • Graphic organizer

  • Paper

  • Pencil

  • Presentation (15 minutes)

  • Small group graphic organizer application (20 minutes)

  • Need to know for three other assignments they will be working on in their other classes.

Lesson 8: Critical review writing


Lesson 8 continued critical review writing

Teaching/modeling

Independent practice

Closure

Struggling students

Group practice

Advanced students

  • Modeling in the presentation of how to use the graphic organizer and how to write a critical review

  • Critical review application in language arts, social studies, and mathematics in days to follow.

  • Use in three additional assignments

  • Some modeling and practice before they work on their individual assessments.

  • Small groups will take a short article and use the graphic organizer to put their thoughts in order. Then they will outline what the review will look like. Followed by writing a short review. If groups are done early they can read the review out loud or do a group peer review with another group who is done.

  • Group practice is designed so groups who are ahead have more than enough options to continue practicing their skills.

Lesson 8 continued: Critical review writing


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