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Parent Involvement: Who’s Accountable? Who Benefits?. Batya Elbaum, Ph.D. University of Miami Annual Meeting of The Family Cafe Orlando, FL June 3, 2006. What is “parent involvement?”. NCLB 2001, Title I: Definition of Parent Involvement.

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Parent involvement who s accountable who benefits
Parent Involvement:Who’s Accountable?Who Benefits?

Batya Elbaum, Ph.D.

University of Miami

Annual Meeting of

The Family Cafe

Orlando, FL

June 3, 2006



Nclb 2001 title i definition of parent involvement
NCLB 2001, Title I: Definition of Parent Involvement

“The statute defines parental involvement as the participation of parents in regular, two-way, and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school activities.”


Nclb 2001 what the mandate for parent involvement policies and activities is intended to accomplish
NCLB 2001: What the mandate for parent involvement policies and activities is intended to accomplish

  • That parents play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning;

  • That parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at school;

  • That parents are full partners in their child’s education and are included, as appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child.


Idea 2004 what support for parent training and information activities is intended to accomplish
IDEA 2004: What support for parent training and information activities is intended to accomplish

  • Create and preserveconstructive relationships between parents and schools

  • Ensure parent involvement in planning and decision making


Idea 2004 what support for parent training and information activities is intended to accomplish1
IDEA 2004: What support for parent training and information activities is intended to accomplish

  • Assist parents todevelop skills they need to participate effectively in the education and development of their children

  • Support parents as participants within partnerships

  • Help overcome economic, cultural, and linguistic barriers to full parent participation


U s parent participation in the iep
U.S. Parent Participation in the IEP activities is intended to accomplish

  • Source: Over 8,000 families interviewed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study, 2003.


U s parent participation in the iep1
U.S. Parent Participation in the IEP activities is intended to accomplish

  • 85% of parents reported that they had participated in an IEP meeting for their child in the previous two years.


Florida parent participation in the iep
Florida Parent Participation in the IEP activities is intended to accomplish

  • Source: Florida’s Annual Performance Report submitted in March, 2005.

  • Results were based on an examination of 343 IEPs from 12 districts that were monitored in 2003-04.


Florida parent participation in the iep1
Florida Parent Participation in the IEP activities is intended to accomplish

  • 59% of the IEPs had parent signatures indicating attendance.

  • 16% of the IEPs showed that parents consented to have the IEP meeting without their presence.


Nlts 2 who primarily developed your child s iep goals
NLTS-2: Who primarily developed your child’s IEP goals? activities is intended to accomplish

School 45%

School and family 33%

Family/youth 21%

  • Source: National Longitudinal Transition Study, 2003.


Parent involvement who s accountable who benefits
NLTS-2: Percent of families that reported they wanted to be activities is intended to accomplishmore involved in decisions about their child’s IEP

  • Source: National Longitudinal Transition Study, 2003.


Parent involvement who s accountable
Parent Involvement: Who’s Accountable? activities is intended to accomplish

  • Under IDEA, Early Intervention Programs and State Educational Agencies are responsible for reporting to OSEP (the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs) on parent involvement.


Government performance and results act of 1993 gpra
Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) activities is intended to accomplish

  • “seeks to shift the focus of government accountability away from a preoccupation with theactivities that are undertaken . . . to afocus on theresults of those activities.”


Program assessment rating tool part
Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) activities is intended to accomplish

  • A grading tool developed by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in 2002 to grade federal programs.


Part ratings for programs under idea
PART Ratings for Programs under IDEA activities is intended to accomplish


The new accountability
The new accountability activities is intended to accomplish

  • Focused Monitoring

  • Performance Indicators

  • State Performance Plan

  • Annual Performance Report


Focused monitoring
Focused Monitoring activities is intended to accomplish

  • A process that purposefully selects priority areas to examine for compliance and results, while not specifically examining other areas for compliance, to

    • maximize resources,

    • emphasize important variables, and

    • increase the probability of improved results.


Performance indicators
Performance Indicators activities is intended to accomplish

  • Part C programs (birth to 3) must report on 14 indicators

  • Part B programs (3-21) must report on 20 indicators

  • For both programs, the indicators focus not only on procedural compliance but on results


State performance plan
State Performance Plan activities is intended to accomplish

  • 6-year plan describing:

    • How the State will collect data addressing each performance indicator;

    • Baseline data: how the State is doing this year

    • Targets: where the State wants to be in 6 years

    • Improvement plan


Annual performance report
Annual Performance Report activities is intended to accomplish

  • Must be submitted to OSEP

  • Results must be reported publicly

  • Results must be reported

    • for the State as a whole, and

    • for each Early Intervention Program and Local Educational Agency (school district) in the State


A part c compliance indicator
A Part C activities is intended to accomplishcomplianceindicator

  • Percent of infants and toddlers with IFSPs who receive the early intervention services on their IFSPs in a timely manner.


A part c results indicator
A Part C activities is intended to accomplishresults indicator

  • Percent of infants and toddlers with IFSPs who demonstrate improved positive social-emotional skills (including social relationships).


A part b compliance indicator
A Part B activities is intended to accomplishcompliance indicator

  • Percent of children referred by Part C (Early Intervention Services) prior to age three (3), who are found eligible for Part B, and who have an IEP developed and implemented by their third birthdays. 


A part b results indicator
A Part B activities is intended to accomplishresults indicator

  • Percent of youth with individualized education programs (IEPs) graduating from high school with a regular diploma compared to percent of all youth in the State graduating with a regular diploma.


What it comes down to
What it comes down to . . . activities is intended to accomplish

“What gets counted, counts!”


Part c indicator 4
Part C Indicator #4 activities is intended to accomplish

“Percent of families participating in Part C who report that early intervention services have helped the family a) know their rights, b) effectively communicate their children’s needs, and c) help their children develop and learn.”


Part b indicator 8
Part B Indicator #8 activities is intended to accomplish

“Percent of parents with a child receiving special education services who report that schools facilitated parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for children with disabilities.”


What s new about the parent family indicators
What’s new about the parent/family indicators activities is intended to accomplish

  • What is measured is not what parents do but

    • what early intervention services do to benefit families, and

    • what schools do to facilitate parent involvement.


What s new about the parent family indicators1
What’s new about the parent/family indicators activities is intended to accomplish

  • The data must come from parents and families:

    “Percent of families/parents who report that . . . “


National center for special education accountability monitoring ncseam
National Center for Special Education Accountability Monitoring (NCSEAM)

  • Assist states to implement Focused Monitoring

  • Develop survey instruments for states’ use in measuring parents’ and families’ perceptions and involvement in early intervention and special education


National center for special education accountability monitoring ncseam1
National Center for Special Education Accountability Monitoring (NCSEAM)

  • NCSEAM has produced 3 survey instruments:

    • Parents of children 6-21 receiving special education services

    • Parents of children 3-5 receiving preschool special education services

    • Families of children birth to 3 receiving early intervention services


Part b items parents agree with most
Part B items parents agree with most Monitoring (NCSEAM)

  • Teachers are available to speak with me.

  • Teachers treat me as a team member.

  • Written information I receive is written in an understandable way.


Part b items parents agree with slightly less
Part B items parents agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)slightly less

  • All of my concerns and recommendations were documented on the IEP.

  • I am considered an equal partner with teachers and other professionals in planning my child’s program.


Part b items parents agree with considerably less
Part B items parents agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)considerably less

  • The school explains what options parents have if they disagree with a decision of the school.

  • The school gives me choices with regard to services that address my child’s needs.


Part b items parents agree with a lot less
Part B items parents agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)a lot less

  • I was offered special assistance (such as child care) so that I could participate in the IEP meeting.

  • I have been asked for my opinion about how well special education services are meeting my child’s needs.


Part b items parents agree with least
Part B items parents agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)least

  • The school gives parents the help they may need to play an active role in their child's education.

  • The school offers parents training about special education issues.


Schools facilitate parent involvement
Schools Facilitate Parent Involvement Monitoring (NCSEAM)

Schools provide training, supports

and accommodations for parents to

be knowledgeable & active participants

Schools involve parents in program

evaluation and accountability

Schools inform parents of their options

in cases of disagreement

Schools address parents’ concerns

Schools listen to parents’ ideas

Schools give parents information

Schools treat parents respectfully

School staff are available


Threshold item the standard for part b
Threshold item (the “standard”) for Part B Monitoring (NCSEAM)

“The school explains what options parents have if they disagree with a decision of the school.”


Schools facilitate parent involvement1
Schools Facilitate Parent Involvement Monitoring (NCSEAM)

Schools provide training, supports

and accommodations for parents to

be knowledgeable & active participants

Schools involve parents in program

evaluation and accountability

Schools inform parents of their options

in cases of disagreement

Schools address parents’ concerns

Schools listen to parents’ ideas

Schools give parents information

Schools treat parents respectfully

School staff are available


Parents report that schools facilitated their involvement
Parents report that schools facilitated their involvement Monitoring (NCSEAM)

Far above threshold

25%

At or just above

threshold

Below threshold

Far below threshold


What we need professionals to do to move forward in partnerships
What we need Monitoring (NCSEAM)professionals to do to move forward in partnerships

Schools provide training, supports

and accommodations for parents to

be knowledgeable & active partners

Affirm their support

Be Accountable

Schools involve parents in program

evaluation and accountability

Be Amenable to disagreement

Schools inform parents of their options in cases of disagreement

Be Accommodating

Schools address parents’ concerns

Be Attuned

Schools listen to parents’ ideas

Be Authoritative

Schools give parents information

Be Accepting

Schools treat parents respectfully

Be Accessible

School staff are available


Part c items families agree with most
Part C Items families agree with most Monitoring (NCSEAM)

Over the past year, early intervention services have helped me and/or my family:

  • Do things with and for my child that are good for my child's development.

  • Understand my child's special needs.

  • Be more optimistic about my child's future.


Part c items families agree with slightly less
Part C Items families agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)slightly less

Over the past year, early intervention services have helped me and/or my family:

  • Communicate more effectively with the people who work with my child and my family.

  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of the people who work with my child and family.


Part c items families agree with a lot less
Part C Items families agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)a lot less

Over the past year, early intervention services have helped me and/or my family:

  • Know about my child's and family's rights concerning special education services.

  • Know where to go for help or support to meet my child's needs.


Part c items families agree with least
Part C Items families agree with Monitoring (NCSEAM)least

Over the past year, early intervention services have helped me and/or my family:

  • Participate in typical activities for children and families in my community.

  • Know about services in the community.


Positive outcomes that families achieve as a result of their participation in early intervention
Positive outcomes that families achieve as a result of their participation in Early Intervention

Families and children participate fully in the community

Parents know their rights and can access services for their child and family

Parents work effectively with the professionals who provide services to their child

Parents have increased knowledge and skills to help their child develop and learn

Parents have greater confidence in themselves and are more optimistic about the future


Families report that early intervention helped them know their rights
Families report that early intervention helped them know their rights

Far above threshold

75%

At or just above

threshold

Below threshold

Far below threshold


Schools facilitate parent involvement2
Schools Facilitate Parent Involvement their rights

Schools provide training, supports

and accommodations for parents to

be knowledgeable & active participants

Schools involve parents in program

evaluation and accountability

Schools inform parents of their options

in cases of disagreement

Schools address parents’ concerns

Schools listen to parents’ ideas

Schools give parents information

Schools treat parents respectfully

School staff are available



Parent involvement who s accountable who benefits

Professionals encourage and facilitate parent involvement their rights

Parents are actively involved


The other side of the coin
The “other side of the coin” their rights

  • Are parents accountable?


How parents can be involved in the accountability system
How parents can be involved in the accountability system their rights

  • Respond to the survey

  • Find out when and where you can get the results

  • Ask if your local school district or early intervention program has developed an improvement plan to address parent involvement and family outcomes


How parents can be involved in the accountability system1
How parents can be involved in the accountability system their rights

  • Ask how the plan is going to be implemented, and who is responsible for overseeing it

  • Ask how you can participate in the improvement process


What we need to do to move forward in partnerships
What their rightswe need to do to move forward in partnerships

Schools provide training, supports

and accommodations for parents to

be knowledgeable & active partners

Be pro-Active

Be Accountable

Schools involve parents in program

evaluation and accountability

Be Assertive

Schools inform parents of their options in cases of disagreement

Articulate our concerns

Schools address parents’ concerns

Acknowledge cooperation

Schools listen to parents’ ideas

Schools give parents information

Pay Attention

Be Approachable

Schools treat parents respectfully

Come Around

School staff are available


Benefits to early intervention programs and school systems
Benefits to Early Intervention Programs and School Systems their rights

  • Fewer resources spent on due process hearings

  • Greater accountability to families

  • Greater likelihood of demonstrating positive results


Benefits to professionals
Benefits to Professionals their rights

  • Support in service delivery

  • Job satisfaction

  • Retention


Benefits to families
Benefits to Families their rights

  • Parenting & coping skills

  • Collaboration & communication skills

  • Advocacy skills

  • Empowerment

  • Quality of life


Benefits to children
Benefits to Children their rights

  • Developmental progress

  • Academic achievement

  • Post-school outcomes

  • Quality of life


State contact for parent involvement in special education
State Contact for Parent Involvement in Special Education their rights

  • Kathy Burton, Program Specialist

  • Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services

  • Phone: 850-245-0478

  • Kathy.Burton@fldoe.org


State contact for family involvement in early intervention
State Contact for Family Involvement in Early Intervention their rights

  • Kelly Purvis, State Parent Consultant

  • Early Steps State Office

  • Phone: 813-996-0997

  • Kelly_Purvis@doh.state.fl.us


Contact for ncseam
Contact for NCSEAM their rights

  • Dr. Batya Elbaum,elbaum@miami.edu

  • National Center for Special Education Accountability Monitoring, www.monitoringcenter.lsuhsc.edu


Moving forward in partnership
Moving Forward in Partnership their rights

WHAT PROFESSIONALS NEED TO DO

WHAT PARENTS NEED TO DO

Schools provide training, supports

and accommodations for parents to

be knowledgeable & active partners

Be Affirming

Be pro-Active

Be Accountable

Be Accountable

Schools involve parents in program

evaluation and accountability

Be Amenable to disagreement

Be Assertive

Schools inform parents of their options in cases of disagreement

Articulate our concerns

Be Accommodating

Schools address parents’ concerns

Acknowledge cooperation

Be Attuned

Schools listen to parents’ ideas

Be Authoritative

Schools give parents information

Pay Attention

Be Accepting

Be Approachable

Schools treat parents respectfully

Be Accessible

Come Around

School staff are available


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