Welcome
Download
1 / 99

WELCOME - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 117 Views
  • Uploaded on

WELCOME. 4 th Annual North Texas Children’s Summit: The Future of Our Children. May 9 th , 2013. An In-Depth Look on the Status and Future of Texas’ Children. Welcoming Remarks. Jaime Hanks Meyers Managing Director, North Texas. North Texas Children’s Summit. Essential Data.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' WELCOME' - stella-walsh


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Welcome

WELCOME

4th Annual North Texas Children’s Summit:

The Future of Our Children

May 9th, 2013

An In-Depth Look on the Status and Future of Texas’ Children


Welcoming Remarks

Jaime Hanks Meyers

Managing Director, North Texas


North texas children s summit
North Texas Children’s Summit

Essential Data

Dr. Bob Sanborn, President and CEO


Demographics
Demographics

As of 2010, there were 1,727,405 children living in North Texas, a 7.4% increase since 2006.

39.2% White

37.7% Latino

17% African-American

6.1% Other


Demographic change
Demographic Change

  • While the overall child population grew by 7.4% between 2006 and 2010,


Poverty
Poverty

  • A family of four is considered poor if their income is less than $23,050.

  • With the federal poverty definition unchanged since the 1960’s, these figures hide the true poverty rate.

  • An average family needs an income twice the poverty level to meet basic needs.


Food insecurity
Food insecurity

With Dallas ISD’s expansion of school breakfast, 86,000 eligible students will be enrolled in the program.


Juvenile justice and mental health
Juvenile Justice and Mental health

Texas spends $38.38 per capita on mental health services, the lowest amount among states.



Education
education

  • In 2011, CHILDREN AT RISK calculated a 73.7%graduation rate from North Texas’ High Schools.

  • When just 21.9% of 8th graders are projected to hold a degree or certificate within ten years, we have an attainment crisis on our hands.


Innovative Approaches in Higher Education

Michael J. Sorrell, J.D.

President, Paul Quinn College


Grading North Texas’ Schools: Indicators of Success and Struggle

Dr. Bob Sanborn

President and CEO, CHILDREN AT RISK


Inside c@r s school rankings
Inside [email protected]’s School Rankings Struggle

  • Statewide project since 2010

  • In North Texas alone, 191 High Schools, 333 Middle Schools, and 1,001 Elementary Schools appeared in the 2013 edition.

  • New grading scale and peer lists empower parents to demand more from their schools

  • With just 21.9% of Texas’ 8th graders projected to hold a college certificate or degree within ten years and nearly half of college freshmen requiring remediation, we need our schools producing college ready students now more than ever.



County breakdown
County breakdown Struggle

  • Ellis, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, and Rockwall counties combined have just 3 “A” schools.

  • Not only does Dallas county have a higher percentage of “A” and “B” schools than Tarrant County, but also a lower percentage of “D” and “F” schools.



Successful models for bridging the gap
Successful models for bridging the gap Struggle

  • Felix G. Botello Elementary (Dallas ISD)

    • Only economically disadvantaged-serving comprehensive school to receive an “A” grade.

  • Uplift Education

  • Irma Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School

  • Early College High Schools

    • Trinidad Garza ECHS, Middle College HS, Early College HS (Carrolton-Farmers Branch).

  • Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Richardson ISD, Mesquite ISD

    • Economically and ethnically balanced, performs at the same level as more affluent districts.


Deeper dive north texas high schools
Deeper Dive: StruggleNorth Texas’ High Schools


North texas has 36 6 of texas a high schools but also 26 4 of its f schools
North Texas has Struggle36.6% of Texas’ “A” high schools, but also 26.4% of its “F” schools.


North texas a high schools

North Texas’ “A” High Schools Struggle

  • Early College HS (Carrolton-Farmers Branch)

  • Plano West Senior HS

  • Coppell HS

  • Lovejoy HS

  • Colleyville Heritage HS

  • Plano Senior HS

  • Westlake Academy

  • Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts

  • Hebron HS

  • Grapevine HS

  • Bell HS

  • Plano East Senior HS

  • Allen HS

School for the Talented & Gifted

School for Science &Engineering

Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School

School of Health Professions

Sanders Law Magnet

Trinidad Garza Early College HS

Middle College HS

Sorrells School of Education and Social Services

Highland Park HS

Uplift North Hills Prep

School of Business and Mgmt.

Pearce HS

Washington SPVA Magnet


High performance and choice

High Performance and Choice Struggle

Dedicated Magnet/Specialized schools and charter schools

  • Early College HS (Carrolton-Farmers Branch)

  • Plano West Senior HS

  • Coppell HS

  • Lovejoy HS

  • Colleyville Heritage HS

  • Plano Senior HS

  • Westlake Academy

  • Fort Worth Academy of Fine Arts

  • Hebron HS

  • Grapevine HS

  • Bell HS

  • Plano East Senior HS

  • Allen HS

School for the Talented & Gifted

School for Science &Engineering

Rangel Young Women’s Leadership School

School of Health Professions

Sanders Law Magnet

Trinidad Garza Early College HS

Middle College HS

Sorrells School of Education and Social Services

Highland Park HS

Uplift North Hills Prep

School of Business and Mgmt.

Pearce HS

Washington SPVA Magnet


  • North Texas: 26 “A” High Schools Struggle

    • 12 Traditional High Schools

    • 11 Magnet/Specialized Schools

    • 3 Charter Schools

  • Houston: 20 “A’ High Schools

    • 6 Traditional High Schools

    • 10 Magnet/Specialized Schools

    • 4 Charter Schools



Demographics Struggle


Attendance
Attendance Struggle

If students completed a 180-day school year at these rates, the student at the “A” school would receive 12 days more instructionthan the student at the “F” school.

The average attendance rate for “A” schools is 97% (higher than 92.5% of all Texas high schools) while “F” schools average 90.7% (lower than 96.5% of all schools).


Graduation rates and the dropout crisis
Graduation Rates and the Dropout Crisis Struggle

Leaver codes broaden this difference


Rigor and results
Rigor and Results Struggle

High standards alone won’t raise a school’s profile, students must be placed in positions where they succeed.


Urban comprehensive schools on the rise
Urban Comprehensive Schools on the Rise Struggle

  • Schools with above-average rates of advanced courses, AP/IB testing, and passing AP/IB exams.

  • Skyline HS

  • Moises E. Molina HS

  • W.H. Adamson HS

  • Irving HS


Questions
Questions Struggle

Dr. Bob Sanborn

@drbobsanborn

@childrenatrisk

Rankings queries:

Ask.fm/childrenatrisk


Food insecurity and our children

Food Insecurity and our Children Struggle

Kimberly A. Aaron, PhD

Executive Vice President

Policy, Programs and Research

North Texas Food Bank

May 9, 2013


Trending topics in child hunger
Trending Topics in Child Hunger Struggle

  • Public Health Issues

    • Fair to poor general health

    • Psychosocial problems

    • Frequent stomachaches and headaches

    • Cognitive issues

    • Asthma

    • Oral health problems

  • Household Financial Management Skills

  • Income Impacts

    • ½ of poor households are food secure

    • 1 in 10 non-poor households are food insecure


Topics in the tx state legislature
Topics in the TX State Legislature Struggle

  • Interest Areas

    • Food bank operations

    • Increased access to nutrition

    • General health

    • Self-sufficiency and reintegration

    • Protection and strengthening of public benefits

  • House

    • 84 bills

  • Senate

    • 27 bills


Bills of particular interest
Bills of Particular Interest Struggle

  • SB 376/HB 296

    • Mandates schools with >80% low-income serve free breakfast to all students

  • HB 3706

    • Requires SFSP sponsors to have a performance bond and background checks

  • HB 749/SB 759

    • Maintains that the TDA work with the THI on a plan to increase participation in SFSP


Snap bills
SNAP Bills Struggle

  • HB 3705, HB1072/SB 879, HB 1141, HB 3486, HB 3845, HB 587, HB 423, HB 523, HB 751, HB 948, HB 1244, HB 1827, HB 3186, HB 3434, HB 3631

  • Address an array of topics

    • Repeal of the full family sanction

    • Count resources of all individuals in “mixed eligibility” household

    • Removal/lessen impact of the drug felony ban

    • Exemption/removal of certain assets from the asset test

    • Prohibition on purchase of certain products

    • Implement incentives on the purchase of nutritious products

    • Etc.


Federal update
Federal Update Struggle

  • Big Concern – SNAP cuts

  • Senate Ag Committee Farm Bill mark-up

    • Target date – Week of May 6th

  • House Ag Committee Farm Bill mark-up

    • Target date – May 15th


Networking break

Networking Break Struggle

4th Annual North Texas Children’s Summit:

The Future of Our Children

May 9th, 2013

An In-Depth Look on the Status and Future of Texas’ Children


Texas School Budget Cuts: Impact & Efficiencies Struggle

Sarah Goff, MPP

Research Coordinator, CHILDREN AT RISK



59% Struggle

Public school

students

qualify

for free or

reduced

lunch



20% Struggle

8th graders that

earn a postsecondary

degree six years

after completing

high school


82 nd legislative session

82 Strugglend Legislative Session


7.8b Struggle

Gap in the

state education

budget

in 2011


Our research

Our Research Struggle




Trends emerged
Trends Emerged Struggle


Trends emerged1
Trends Emerged Struggle



Top expenditure reductions
Top Expenditure Reductions Struggle

  • Athletics

  • Guidance Counseling

  • Administrative Professional Development

  • Student Support & Interventions

  • Library Services

  • Teacher Professional Development

  • Health Services




Thank you to our funders
THANK YOU TO OUR FUNDERS Struggle

Genevieve and Ward Orsinger Foundation

Kathryn & Beau Ross Foundation

KDK-Harman Foundation

Powell Foundation

Meadows Foundation

M.R. and Evelyn Hudson Foundation

RGK Foundation

San Antonio Area Foundation

The Simmons Foundation

The Trull Foundation

Wright Family Foundation


Child Protection and Home Visiting Legislation StruggleMadeline McClure, LCSWExecutive DirectorTexProtects, The Texas Association for the Protection of Children


Actual reports of child abuse
Actual Reports of Child Abuse Struggle

1,681 COWBOY STADIUM



Biennial Texas Child Abuse Costs vs. Struggle

Prevention Investment

The Graduate College of Social Work University of Houston analysis of the costs of child abuse concluded that Texas spent $6,279,204,373 in 2007 on direct and indirect costs dealing with the after-affects of child abuse and neglect.

(2009) Cache Seitz Steinberg, Ph.D. Kelli Connell-Carrick, Ph.D. Patrick Leung, Ph. D. Joe Papick, MSW Katherine Barillas, MSW, ABD (August, 2009). REPORT TO THE INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COUNCIL FOR BUILDING HEALTHY FAMILIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY AND PROTECTIVE SERVICES: Evaluation Elements 1-6 Final Report.

(2007) TDFPS Costs projected for 08-09: LAR budget for CPS costs including foster/ adopt costs. Excludes other DFPS functions (APS, CCL, PEI). Total PEI costs 2007 LAR Prevention budget for 08-09


Prevention solution home visitation
PREVENTION SOLUTION: Home Visitation Struggle

What is “Home Visitation”?

HV programs offer information, guidance, risk assessment, and parenting support in the home for families with young children.

  • Services delivered by trained professionals or paraprofessionals

  • Targeted to specific at-risk groups

  • Families enroll voluntarily

  • Last from 6 months to 2yr.

  • Intergenerational focus

  • Designed to improve a myriad of health, educational, safety and economic issues

  • Different model curricula for different clients

61


Home Visitation-Most Effective Defense Struggle

Outcomes Among Multiple Evidence-Based Home Visiting Programs


83 Strugglerd Legislative Agenda

Child Abuse Prevention Priorities: Home Visitation

Monetary Benefits to Society

Legislation

SB 426 (Nelson / Zerwas)

Texas Home Visitation Expansion and Accountability Act

  • Ensure home visiting programs (HVP) set clear standards and are accountable for their outcomes.

  • HHSC ensures HVP Implemented with fidelity to research model and evaluated for efficacy

  • Create a framework that ensures 75% of state revenues invested in evidence-based programs

  • Allow 25% of the funds to be invested in Innovative “Promising Practices.”

    Funding Request

  • $27.5 million- Original Ask for 30% state funding increase

  • $7.9 million: In Senate Budget-Conference Cmte Item

  • SB 1836 (Deuell) and Article II Budget Rider (Zerwas)

    Permissive language for BC, ML and DF fee check-off donation

    .


83 Strugglerd Legislative Agenda

Child Abuse Prevention Priorities: Child Protection Act

Legislation

SB 939 (West) / HB 2495 (Parker)

Child Protection Act

  • Require institutions of higher education, elementary and secondary schools and charter schools to provide professional training to new and existing staff on preventing, recognizing, and reporting suspected child abuse.

  • Must have written policy directly reflecting reporting statute

  • No fiscal impact

    SB 384 (Carona) / HB 1205 (Parker)

    Increase Penalty for Failure to Report

  • For statutorily defined “professional reporters,” failing to report child abuse, with the intent to conceal abuse, allow a range of penalties from the current Class C misdemeanor to a state jail felony.

  • No fiscal impact


Texas cps caseworker t

Texas CPS Caseworker Turnover Struggle

Texas CPS Caseworker T

Rider 11 – Human Resources Management Plan, October 1, 2012

State Auditor Office – Annual Report on Classified Employee Turnover for Fiscal Year 2012 , December 2012


Fewer Changes in Caseworkers Increases the Chances of Permanency for Children

Children Entering and Exiting Care to Permanency, from January 1, 2004 through September 2004, Who Experienced Worker Changes


83 Permanency for Children rd Legislative Agenda

CPS Caseworker Retention Solutions

SB 1758 (Uresti)

Task Force on Caseworker Recruitment and Retention

  • Establish a task force composed of external business CEO’s, expert labor consultants, human resource leaders, other innovators and CPS program staff to design a performance-based compensation and recognition system.

  • Recommend strategies for screening, recruitment and training to improve the hiring and retention of CPS caseworkers.


Questions? Permanency for Children

Madeline McClure, E.D.

TexProtects

Meadows Foundation Executive Suite 2904 Floyd Street, Suite C

Dallas, TX 75204

214.442.1674

[email protected]

www.texprotects.org


Lunch

LUNCH Permanency for Children

4th Annual North Texas Children’s Summit:

The Future of Our Children

May 9th, 2013

An In-Depth Look on the Status and Future of Texas’ Children


Specialty courts

Specialty Courts Permanency for Children

May 9, 2013

Dr. Terry Smith

Executive Director


Overview
Overview Permanency for Children


Experiencing success through empowerment encouragement and mentoring esteem court
Experiencing Success Through Empowerment, Encouragement and MentoringESTEEM Court

Mission Statement: To provide positive experiences for referred female youth that will foster success and empowerment and thereby prevent further involvement in thelegal system.

TARGET POPULATION

  • This population can be enrolled with the Girls Diversionary Program (ESTEEM Court).

  • High Risk Victims (HRV) who have committed a CINS offense or have had misdemeanor charges deferred by the District Attorney, and have at least one of the following criteria:

    • At least four runaways from home in 12 month period, or

    • At least one residential stay at Letot, or

    • Family fails to participate in any Aftercare/Non-Residential service and does not follow through with recommendations, and is

    • A victim of child exploitation as defined below:

      • Has been prostituted, or

      • Has worked in a strip club, or

      • Has been sexually advertised, or

      • Has been sexually photographed for sharing with others, or

      • Has received (or was promised) food, money, shelter, or anything of value in exchange for sex (or any sexually explicit activity), or

      • Has been or is currently in an on-going sexual relationship with an adult described as a boyfriend/girlfriend.

  • Letot Residential/Non-residential Case Managers, Field Deferred Prosecution Probation Officers (PO), and Detention Intake POs can identify girls on their caseload who are victims of sexual exploitation as previously defined.

    • Later the ESTEEM Court will consider a Track 2 for adjudicated girls identified as High Risk Victims.


Esteem court
ESTEEM Court Mentoring

II GOALS

Facilitate successful program completion by providing continuity of Judge, Probation Officer and service provider.

Address the needs of the target population by providing wraparound/family services, which includes PO supervision utilizing home and school visits, and electronic monitoring if needed.

Utilize available community-based resources first and Department services as needed, ensuring clients have access to supervision, clinical services, medical care, and substance abuse services. The family can continue to access community resources after discharge from the Diversionary Program.

Increase family involvement by providing support services for the family as well as the child.

Provide an exit plan for success after diversion.

Decrease further entry into the juvenile system, reducing Department expenses, and improving outcomes for the families.

Experiencing Success Through Encouragement, Empowerment and Mentoring

The Pathway to Success

ESTEEM COURT


Diversion male court
Diversion Male Court Mentoring

Mission Statement: The goal of Diversion Male Court is to reduce the disproportionate representation of minority male youth in the Juvenile Justice System by diverting these youth from the court process by providing community-based alternatives that promote positive empowerment to the youth and family.

GOALS:

  • Divert the minority males from becoming involved in the Juvenile Justice System, by providing opportunities and guided alternatives.

  • Assist minority males and their families by encouraging positive interactions within the structure of the home.

  • Educate families on community resources and encourage increased family involvement with, and stronger advocacy for, their children.

  • Maximize department resources while improving outcomes for the families.

  • Facilitate successful program completion by providing continuity of Judge, Probation Officer and service provider.

  • Address the needs of the target population by providing wraparound/family services (if needed), which includes PO supervision utilizing home and school visits, and electronic monitoring if needed.

  • Utilize available community-based resources first and Department services as needed, ensuring clients have access to supervision, clinical services, medical care, and substance abuse services. The family can continue to access community resources after discharge from the Diversionary Program.

  • Increase family involvement by providing support services for the family as well as the youth.

  • Provide an exit plan for success after diversion.

  • Assist minority males and provide them with additional skills in order to ensure more positive roles in the community and society.


Diversion male court1
Diversion Male Court Mentoring

STAFFING:

  • Currently there are not any additional costs associated with the implementation of the Dallas County Juvenile Probation Diversion Male Court. All staff and/or vendors are presently in these positions and will absorb the functionality of the Diversion Male Court.

    OBJECTIVES:

    • Intervene at the pre-adjudication point to address problem areas quickly and without further Juvenile Court intervention.

    • Provide services to the family that meet the needs identified by an assessment, using community resources and/or services from the Department.

    • Develop and implement a clear and concise case plan involving the youth, parents and probation officer.

    • Make appropriate referrals for the identified services needed; to include mental health, educational, vocational, and family health care.

    • Diligently monitor each juvenile’s attendance in school, their behavior at home and their progress in therapy and/or community based services.

    • Implement the use of immediate and appropriate incentives and/or responses for both compliance and noncompliance with the Diversion Male Court requirements.

    • Provide judicial oversight and coordination of all services initiated to promote accountability, and to bring together all involved community agencies to work in partnership with the Diversion Male Court to achieve the identified goals.

    • Provide character development skills and behavior strategies.

      REFERRALS:

  • Probation Intake Officers, Psychology staff, Deferred Prosecution Officers, DA Liaison Officer can refer youth to the Diversion Male Court program if any of the following criteria apply:

    • A psychological/psychiatric screening or evaluation reveals that the youth is appropriate for the program due to referral/offense status, is a minority males or has a recommendation;

    • The Detention Intake Screening process or the Intake Screening Officer determines that:

      • the juvenile may benefit from on-going clinical services in the community; and

      • the juvenile qualifies for a diversion program;

      • the juvenile is currently participating in therapy or counseling in the community and might benefit from additional services and monitoring.

        ELIGIBILITY:

  • The juvenile must have a pending charge alleging an offense other than truancy, a sexual offense or runaway, and has not previously been adjudicated on any charge. The juvenile is found to be appropriate for supervision through a deferred prosecution program. The juvenile and their family must agree to participate in the program


Preparation at the local level is critical to understanding the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC. (U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. September 2009).

2010 Juvenile Population Data Comparison


Mental health court
Mental Health Court the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

Mission Statement: To assist and divert juveniles with mental health illness from entry into the juvenile justice system, while connecting the juveniles/families with community mental health based services.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, established in 1948, is a private charitable organization dedicated to helping build better futures for disadvantaged children in the United States. Within the Foundation the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) was designed to support the Foundation’s vision that all youth involved in the juvenile justice system have opportunities to develop into healthy, productive adults. After more than 15 years of innovation and replication, JDAI is one of the nation’s most effective, influential, and widespread juvenile justice system reform initiatives.

The Dallas County Juvenile Department became a JDAI replication site in June 2005. We are entering our sixth year as a site. JDAI promotes changes to policies, practices, and programs to:

  • reduce reliance on secure confinement;

  • improve public safety;

  • reduce racial disparities and bias;

  • save taxpayers’ dollars; and

  • stimulate overall juvenile justice system reforms.


Mental health court1
Mental Health Court the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

  • More than 1.2 million children in Texas have a diagnosable mental health disorder. One in five children suffers from a mental illness, and one in ten of these children suffer from a serious mental illness. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, it is estimated that approximately 70% of the youth in the Juvenile Justice System have at least one mental health diagnosis. Conversely out of this 70%; twenty percent (20%) of these youth present with significant mental health impairment. The justifications for establishing Mental Health Courts or Specialized Needs Units is a response to keep those youth with mental health concerns or issues from entering into more expensive and possibly less effective detention facilities or private placement.

  • With a juvenile mental health court, intensive screening is done upfront to identify kids with mental illness early on and determine if they are eligible for and can benefit from the court’s community-based programs, instead of detention. The court also provides more treatment options for youth with mental illness.

  • As of mid-2010, there were approximately 50 Juvenile Mental Health Courts across the country. In Texas, there are four such specialized courts. The first began in Austin (Travis County), followed by San Antonio (Bexar County), El Paso, (El Paso County), and Houston (Harris County). (The Council of State Governments, Justice Center (2010) http://www.consensuproject.org)

  • The justifications for establishing Mental Health Courts or Specialized Needs Units is a response to keep those youth with mental health concerns or issues from entering into more expensive and possibly less effective detention facilities or private placement.

  • Probation officers in the Special Needs Unit (SNU) are assigned to supervise youth on probation who have been diagnosed as exhibiting some type of mental or medical impairment which significantly hampers their overall functioning.  Probation staff partners with Dallas MetroCare therapists to deliver special services to youth with mental health issues, psychiatric symptoms or emotional disturbance. Staff design highly individualized supervision plans which incorporate intensive in-home family therapy, medication management when necessary and other community-based resources.


Drug court
Drug Court the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

Mission: The Drug Court Diversionary Program’s mission is to provide pre-adjudication intervention services to youth referred to the Juvenile Department for a misdemeanor drug offense by introducing skills that will aid them in leading productive, substance-free lives, by encouraging academic success, by supporting the youth in resisting further involvement in delinquent behavior and thereby assisting the youth in avoiding formal adjudication and disposition.

The Drug Court Diversionary Program is a voluntary program addressing adolescent drug abuse and related delinquent behavior through:

  • Education

  • Intervention

  • Treatment

  • Family Involvement

    This is accomplished through collaborative efforts by community service providers and the Dallas County Juvenile Department Drug Court.

    Benefits of Drug Court? Drug Court Diversionary Program provide youth with:

  • An opportunity to be clean and sober

  • Skills to lead productive, substance-free, and delinquent-free lives

  • Guidance to perform well in school

  • Diversion from formal involvement with the justice system.

    The Drug Court Diversion Program can be completed within six months. After successful completion, program staff complete the necessary paperwork to seal the child’s records.

    Failure to complete the program due to a new arrest, continued substance abuse, or failure to comply with the Drug Court Agreement will result in a referral to the District Attorney’s Office for filing the current offense.

    Requirements?

  • Youth attend review hearings regularly, submit to frequent and random drug testing, complete community service, and participate in therapeutic treatment based on their level of substance use. Youth are intensively supervised through curfew checks, school attendance and monitoring, among others.

  • Parents attend required review hearings with the child before the Drug Court Judge and participate in treatment based on the youth’s drug use. Parents provide an open and honest progress report about their child’s behavior and substance use at home. The program staff provide parents with information and education that empowers them to supervise their children and promote positive behaviors.

    Dallas County Juvenile Department reviews all police reports submitted by county police agencies and refers only misdemeanor drug related cases to Drug Court. If this is the youth’s first referral for a misdemeanor drug offense, an orientation is scheduled with the parent and child to determine if the Drug Court Diversionary Program will be beneficial to all involved.

    Drug Court hearings, meetings and groups meet south of downtown Dallas near 35E and 8th street, at 414 South R.L. Thorton Freeway,

    Dallas, Texas 75203.


  • Specialty courts1

    Specialty Courts the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    May 9, 2013

    Dr. Terry Smith

    Executive Director


    E s t e e m court
    E.S.T.E.E.M the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.. Court

    Experiencing Success Through Empowerment, Encouragement and Mentoring

    Judge Cheryl Lee Shannon


    Mission statement
    Mission Statement the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    To provide positive experiences for referred female youth that will foster success and empowerment and thereby prevent further involvement in the legal system.


    Target population
    TARGET POPULATION the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    High Risk Victims (HRV) who have committed CINS offense or have had misdemeanor charges deferred by the District Attorney and have one of the following criteria:

    • At least 4 runaways in 12 month period, or at least one residential stay at Letot;

      - A victim of child exploitation


    Goals
    GOALS the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    -Facilitate successful completion by providing continuity of Judge, Probation Officer and service provider.

    - Address the needs of the target population by providing wraparound services.

    - Utilize available community-based resources and Department services as needed.

    - Increase family involvement by providing services for the family as well as the child.


    Goals con t
    Goals the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.con’t

    - Provide and exit plan for success after diversion

    - Decrease further entry into the juvenile system, reducing Department expenses, and improving outcomes for the families.


    Implementation
    IMPLEMENTATION the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    - Conduct an Intake Staffing with the family to explain the program (determine if admission criteria is met and their willingness to participate)

    - Administer Assessment to determine the needs of the child and family.

    - Develop and implement a clear and concise case plan

    - Provide referrals to the family that meet the identified needs


    Implementation con t
    Implementation the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.con’t

    - Girls group session after Court to debrief, promote comraderie and build positive relationships.

    - Parent Group session after Court to debrief, provide group support and introduce new parenting strategies.

    - Treatment Group, HOPE, specifically designed for this population by Letot’s clinical staff


    Implementation con t1
    Implementation the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.con’t

    - Provide the family with a directory of community services for their personal use.

    - Assign girls 15 hours of CSR


    Court process
    Court Process the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    - Court meets weekly

    - Court Team staffs cases weekly

    - Judge gives overview of the program to child and family

    - Review Hearings

    - Groups following Court


    Community partners
    COMMUNITY PARTNERS the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    Big Brothers/Big Sisters

    AIM Truancy


    The pathway to success
    The Pathway to Success the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    • Level 1 – Sapphire

      - Level 2 – Emerald

    • Level 3 – Ruby

      - Level 4 - Diamond


    Our successes
    OUR SUCCESSES the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    Graduates


    Healthy Families and Healthy Communities: the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    A Dialogue

    Nancy Correa, CHILDREN AT RISK

    Thom Suhy, Center on Communities and Education of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, Southern Methodist University

    Moderated By: Jaime Hanks Meyers, CHILDREN AT RISK


    Cities for People the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    Brent Brown, AIA

    Founding Director, bcWORKSHOP


    Safe at Home: the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    The Impact of Domestic Violence on Children

    Debra Mitchel-Ibe

    Director of Community Outreach, The Family Place


    Thank you

    THANK YOU the roles, values, priorities, and joint missions of local stakeholders as they begin to reduce DMC.

    4th Annual North Texas Children’s Summit:

    The Future of Our Children

    May 9th, 2013

    An In-Depth Look on the Status and Future of Texas’ Children


    ad