Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten VPK Assessment Instructional Implications Assessment Period 2
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1. Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) Assessment Instructional Implications Assessment Period 2 Welcome to the Department of Education?s Office of Early Learning VPK Assessment Instructional Implications presentation for Assessment Period 2 . The Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) Assessment was developed in collaboration with the Florida Center for Reading Research. The purpose of the VPK Assessment is to provide teachers with valid and reliable feedback regarding children?s progress in attaining the skills in the VPK Education Standards. Teachers may use this information to guide instructional decisions in the VPK classroom. Welcome to the Department of Education?s Office of Early Learning VPK Assessment Instructional Implications presentation for Assessment Period 2 . The Florida Voluntary Prekindergarten (VPK) Assessment was developed in collaboration with the Florida Center for Reading Research. The purpose of the VPK Assessment is to provide teachers with valid and reliable feedback regarding children?s progress in attaining the skills in the VPK Education Standards. Teachers may use this information to guide instructional decisions in the VPK classroom.

2. 2 Within this presentation the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System score types and reports will also be reviewed to assist teachers with interpretation of VPK Assessment data for Assessment Period 2. Instructional resources will be shared for planning instruction based on VPK Assessment data as well as other student data teachers may have available. ? Within this presentation the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System score types and reports will also be reviewed to assist teachers with interpretation of VPK Assessment data for Assessment Period 2. Instructional resources will be shared for planning instruction based on VPK Assessment data as well as other student data teachers may have available. ?

3. Assessment 3 Before we begin to specifically discuss the Florida VPK Assessment, it may be helpful to discuss the role and use of assessment in general. Before we begin to specifically discuss the Florida VPK Assessment, it may be helpful to discuss the role and use of assessment in general.

4. What is assessment? Assessment is a method for collecting information about something you want to measure. We conduct assessments daily (e.g., stock market gains, weight loss, student progress). Data collection can fall into two categories, formal and informal assessment. 4 Collecting information to measure children?s progress in the VPK classroom can be accomplished in many ways; including observation curriculum embedded activities and assessments and interaction observed during constructive play Data collection can fall into two categories, formal and informal assessment.Collecting information to measure children?s progress in the VPK classroom can be accomplished in many ways; including observation curriculum embedded activities and assessments and interaction observed during constructive play Data collection can fall into two categories, formal and informal assessment.

5. Types of Assessments Screening assessments can help to sort information based on defined criteria. are usually administered with children at the beginning of the school year. Progress Monitoring assessments are administered multiple times throughout the year to gather information about change over time. track progress toward benchmarks so that changes can be made in instruction to meet children?s needs. evaluate whether the core curriculum is effective for the majority of the children. 5 Both screening and progress monitoring assessments can give teachers valuable information to guide next steps in planning and implementing instruction. The Florida VPK Assessment is a formal progress monitoring assessment administered three times during the year to track children?s progress toward early literacy and numeracy skills in preparation for kindergarten. Both screening and progress monitoring assessments can give teachers valuable information to guide next steps in planning and implementing instruction. The Florida VPK Assessment is a formal progress monitoring assessment administered three times during the year to track children?s progress toward early literacy and numeracy skills in preparation for kindergarten.

6. Using the VPK Assessment Scores to Guide Instruction 6

7. VPK Assessment Online Reporting System https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Assessment/VPKAssessments.aspx 7 Registered users may access the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System through the Bright Beginnings website https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Assessment/VPKAssessments.aspx by clicking on the ?Proceed to the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System? button at the bottom of the page. First, the Assessment Period 2 scores for each child should be entered into the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System. Then, teachers may create and print a report for each child in their class. For first time users, directions on accessing the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System and creating reports may be found in the VPK Assessment Teacher?s Manual included in each VPK Assessment kit. Registered users may access the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System through the Bright Beginnings website https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Assessment/VPKAssessments.aspx by clicking on the ?Proceed to the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System? button at the bottom of the page. First, the Assessment Period 2 scores for each child should be entered into the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System. Then, teachers may create and print a report for each child in their class. For first time users, directions on accessing the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System and creating reports may be found in the VPK Assessment Teacher?s Manual included in each VPK Assessment kit.

8. Guiding questions for this presentation include: What am I looking for when I compare each child?s Assessment Period 1 and 2 results? GROWTH Which VPK Assessment Online Reporting System reports should I use to determine if each child has made growth? Child Level Measure Reports ? Guiding questions for this presentation include: What am I looking for when I compare each child?s Assessment Period 1 and 2 results? GROWTH Which VPK Assessment Online Reporting System reports should I use to determine if each child has made growth? Child Level Measure Reports ?

9. VPK Assessment Score Types 9 There are two score types reported on the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System reports. The raw score refers simply to the total number of items correct on a measure. For example, the raw score of ?8? would mean that the child answered 8 of the items correct on the measure. The second score type, percentage correct, refers to the number of items correct expressed as a fraction of 100. For example, if a child answered 8 items correctly out of 10, the percentage would be expressed as 80%.There are two score types reported on the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System reports. The raw score refers simply to the total number of items correct on a measure. For example, the raw score of ?8? would mean that the child answered 8 of the items correct on the measure. The second score type, percentage correct, refers to the number of items correct expressed as a fraction of 100. For example, if a child answered 8 items correctly out of 10, the percentage would be expressed as 80%.

10. VPK Assessment Map 10 This VPK Assessment Map depicts the assessment tasks, VPK standards addressed, and the score types reported on the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System reports. The skill areas and the methods used for the assessment align to the VPK standards and benchmarks. The standards indicate what a child should know and be able to do at the end of their VPK year. ? The measures are also aligned with the Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener which includes the Broad Screen/Progress Monitoring measure of the Florida Assessment for Instruction in Reading (FAIR)(e.g., letter naming and phonemic awareness in kindergarten). The VPK Assessment measures are designed to be equal in terms of the skill level assessed; this is called ?parallel or equal forms.? The outcomes will show the impact of effective instruction through child progress over time. This VPK Assessment Map depicts the assessment tasks, VPK standards addressed, and the score types reported on the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System reports. The skill areas and the methods used for the assessment align to the VPK standards and benchmarks. The standards indicate what a child should know and be able to do at the end of their VPK year. ? The measures are also aligned with the Florida Kindergarten Readiness Screener which includes the Broad Screen/Progress Monitoring measure of the Florida Assessment for Instruction in Reading (FAIR)(e.g., letter naming and phonemic awareness in kindergarten). The VPK Assessment measures are designed to be equal in terms of the skill level assessed; this is called ?parallel or equal forms.? The outcomes will show the impact of effective instruction through child progress over time.

11. Assessment Periods For each measure, administration will occur three times across a school year. These three assessment times are called assessment periods. Approximate times for these assessment periods (AP) will be; fall, the month of October (AP 1) winter, the month of February (AP 2) spring, the month of May (AP 3) Scores from the assessment may be entered by teachers into the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System at any time during the month of administration or during the two weeks after the month of administration in order to obtain reports to assist with data analysis. For each measure, administration will occur three times across a school year. These three assessment times are called assessment periods. Approximate times for these assessment periods (AP) will be; fall, the month of October (AP 1) winter, the month of February (AP 2) spring, the month of May (AP 3) Scores from the assessment may be entered by teachers into the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System at any time during the month of administration or during the two weeks after the month of administration in order to obtain reports to assist with data analysis.

12. It is important to understand the VPK Assessment expected score norms for Assessment Period 2 before sample reports are reviewed within this presentation. These expected scores are based on children?s test scores from the Field Trial of the VPK Assessment in the 2009 - 2010 School year (N > 1200) and children?s test scores from development and validation work for the VPK Assessment measures. It is important to understand the VPK Assessment expected score norms for Assessment Period 2 before sample reports are reviewed within this presentation. These expected scores are based on children?s test scores from the Field Trial of the VPK Assessment in the 2009 - 2010 School year (N > 1200) and children?s test scores from development and validation work for the VPK Assessment measures.

13. Types of Reports to Review 13 VPK teachers will need to access the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System to create and print reports. After logging in, VPK teachers have access to child level reports and classroom level reports for the children within their own class. The VPK Administrator for a center will have access to all report types. ? VPK teachers will find it helpful to review both child level and classroom level reports. Child level reports provide raw scores or percentage correct for the individual child on all assessment measures. Child level reports would be useful for analyzing individual child progress or perhaps sharing with parents during a parent conference. Classroom level reports provide raw scores for all children within the class on all assessment measures. Classroom level reports would be useful for a teacher to see at a glance how the class as a whole has performed on each of the assessment measures for planning instruction. ? Please keep in mind, the VPK Assessment should not be used for teacher accountability, but rather as a tool for assisting teachers in planning instruction for children and monitoring progress. VPK teachers will need to access the VPK Assessment Online Reporting System to create and print reports. After logging in, VPK teachers have access to child level reports and classroom level reports for the children within their own class. The VPK Administrator for a center will have access to all report types. ? VPK teachers will find it helpful to review both child level and classroom level reports. Child level reports provide raw scores or percentage correct for the individual child on all assessment measures. Child level reports would be useful for analyzing individual child progress or perhaps sharing with parents during a parent conference. Classroom level reports provide raw scores for all children within the class on all assessment measures. Classroom level reports would be useful for a teacher to see at a glance how the class as a whole has performed on each of the assessment measures for planning instruction. ? Please keep in mind, the VPK Assessment should not be used for teacher accountability, but rather as a tool for assisting teachers in planning instruction for children and monitoring progress.

14. This is a sample Child Level Measure Report by Assessment Period. Let?s begin by looking at Assessment Period 2 results (indicated by the red arrow). The score range on the left side of the chart is 0-18 indicating the number of items on the measure. We can see that this child scored a raw score of 14 correct items out of 18 items on the mathematics measure for AP 2. Based upon the AP2 score expectation norms, this child is meeting expectations for AP2 for this particular measure. This information, along with other accessible data, may indicate that the child is making adequate progress towards attaining counting skills, numerical relations skills, and/or arithmetic reasoning skills based upon the items missed on this measure. Although the child is meeting expectations, the teacher should continue to provide instructional support to accelerate the child?s learning. This report includes the child?s scores for AP1 and AP2. This report is helpful in demonstrating the child?s progress over time. A score increase each assessment period is desired to demonstrate growth. This is a sample Child Level Measure Report by Assessment Period. Let?s begin by looking at Assessment Period 2 results (indicated by the red arrow). The score range on the left side of the chart is 0-18 indicating the number of items on the measure. We can see that this child scored a raw score of 14 correct items out of 18 items on the mathematics measure for AP 2. Based upon the AP2 score expectation norms, this child is meeting expectations for AP2 for this particular measure. This information, along with other accessible data, may indicate that the child is making adequate progress towards attaining counting skills, numerical relations skills, and/or arithmetic reasoning skills based upon the items missed on this measure. Although the child is meeting expectations, the teacher should continue to provide instructional support to accelerate the child?s learning. This report includes the child?s scores for AP1 and AP2. This report is helpful in demonstrating the child?s progress over time. A score increase each assessment period is desired to demonstrate growth.

15. This is a sample Child Level Assessment Period Report by Measure. This report shows an individual child?s raw score and percentage correct (0-100%) for the selected assessment period on all measures. The raw score is found on the bar for each measure and percentages are indicated on the left side of the graph. This child scored a raw score of 12 on Print Knowledge (100%), a raw score of 13 on Phonological Awareness (93%), a raw score of 14 on Mathematics (78%), and a raw score of 22 (96%) on Oral Language/Vocabulary. This report would be helpful for teachers in seeing at a glance how the child performed on all measures. This child has exceeded expectations on the measures for Print Knowledge, Phonological Awareness, and Oral Language/Vocabulary and is meeting expectations on the Mathematics measure. This is a sample Child Level Assessment Period Report by Measure. This report shows an individual child?s raw score and percentage correct (0-100%) for the selected assessment period on all measures. The raw score is found on the bar for each measure and percentages are indicated on the left side of the graph. This child scored a raw score of 12 on Print Knowledge (100%), a raw score of 13 on Phonological Awareness (93%), a raw score of 14 on Mathematics (78%), and a raw score of 22 (96%) on Oral Language/Vocabulary. This report would be helpful for teachers in seeing at a glance how the child performed on all measures. This child has exceeded expectations on the measures for Print Knowledge, Phonological Awareness, and Oral Language/Vocabulary and is meeting expectations on the Mathematics measure.

16. This is a sample Classroom Level Measure Report by Child - Sorted. This report shows a raw score for each child in the classroom for the selected assessment period on one of the four assessment measures. Using this report, a teacher is able to identify children who may need additional instructional support with mathematics skills. This sample report indicates that for Classroom A, during AP 2, one child scored below expectations (below 9): with a score of 8. Because this child scored below expectations on the Mathematics measure, the teacher should plan targeted instruction in this area based upon the need demonstrated on the assessment measure items. For example, if the child did not demonstrate mastery of one-to-one-correspondence in counting, additional instructional activities and opportunities for practice found either embedded within the curriculum or from other sources could be utilized. Since most of the children in this sample class are meeting or exceeding expectations at this point in the year, the teacher may want to utilize additional instructional resources to continue the children?s progress in attaining new skills. This is a sample Classroom Level Measure Report by Child - Sorted. This report shows a raw score for each child in the classroom for the selected assessment period on one of the four assessment measures. Using this report, a teacher is able to identify children who may need additional instructional support with mathematics skills. This sample report indicates that for Classroom A, during AP 2, one child scored below expectations (below 9): with a score of 8. Because this child scored below expectations on the Mathematics measure, the teacher should plan targeted instruction in this area based upon the need demonstrated on the assessment measure items. For example, if the child did not demonstrate mastery of one-to-one-correspondence in counting, additional instructional activities and opportunities for practice found either embedded within the curriculum or from other sources could be utilized. Since most of the children in this sample class are meeting or exceeding expectations at this point in the year, the teacher may want to utilize additional instructional resources to continue the children?s progress in attaining new skills.

17. Recommendations for Children Scoring Below Expectations 17

18. Reinforce the following VPK Standards skills related to Print Knowledge throughout the day: 18 Supportive Instructional Strategies: Ask children to point to a specific letter within a printed word that is part of a poem, song, sign, book, or other written text. Give children a set of three to five letters and ask them to find a target letter. Print letters in multiple fonts, cut them out, and help children sort them into same letter piles. Provide child?s name in multiple places within the classroom. Have child point to the letter that begins his/her name. Give children frequent opportunities to say aloud the name of letters when shown them on posters or alphabet manipulatives. Using manipulatives instruct children in matching letter sounds to the letter name and the printed letter shape. Provide a variety of familiar objects for children to sort into first sound piles. Model spelling children?s names aloud using letter sounds instead of letter names, and provide children with opportunities to practice this with their own and each other?s names. Supportive Instructional Strategies: Ask children to point to a specific letter within a printed word that is part of a poem, song, sign, book, or other written text. Give children a set of three to five letters and ask them to find a target letter. Print letters in multiple fonts, cut them out, and help children sort them into same letter piles. Provide child?s name in multiple places within the classroom. Have child point to the letter that begins his/her name. Give children frequent opportunities to say aloud the name of letters when shown them on posters or alphabet manipulatives. Using manipulatives instruct children in matching letter sounds to the letter name and the printed letter shape. Provide a variety of familiar objects for children to sort into first sound piles. Model spelling children?s names aloud using letter sounds instead of letter names, and provide children with opportunities to practice this with their own and each other?s names.

19. Shows age-appropriate phonological awareness Child can distinguish individual words within spoken phrases or sentences. Child combines words to make a compound word. Child deletes a word from a compound word. Child combines syllables into words. Child can delete a syllable from a word. Child combines onset and rime to form a familiar one-syllable word with and without pictorial support. 19 Reinforce the following VPK Standards skills related to Phonological Awareness throughout the day: Supportive Instructional Strategies: Play games that help children distinguish individual words within spoken phrases or sentences (e.g., clapping hands together once for each word). Provide and demonstrate the use of compound word puzzles and picture cards for children to use when practicing blending compound words they say aloud. Say compound words and then leave off first or second part of the compound words (e.g., Teacher says, ?say backpack? and the child responds, ?backpack.? Teacher says, ?now say backpack without back? and the child says ?pack.? Teacher says, ?say watermelon? and the child responds, ?watermelon.? Teacher says, ?now say watermelon without melon? and the child says, ?water.?). Play a clapping game, clapping once while saying each syllable in children?s names, and encourage children to join in (e.g., Lin-da gets two claps, Pat gets one clap, and Mar-ga-ret gets three claps). Provide pictures of familiar two-syllable words cut into two pieces. First model, then encourage the children to practice putting the pictures together while saying the word aloud. Provide a basket with several real items that are two or three syllables. Ask child to select one item and move the item up and down to indicate the syllables. (e.g., helicopter -?he? ?Ii? ?cop? ?tor;? tractor -?trac? ?tor?). Provide pictures of familiar one-syllable words cut into two pieces for children to put together and separate while orally blending together and taking apart the words into onset/rime segments. Have the children find the card that does not start with the same sound as the other three. Supportive Instructional Strategies: Play games that help children distinguish individual words within spoken phrases or sentences (e.g., clapping hands together once for each word). Provide and demonstrate the use of compound word puzzles and picture cards for children to use when practicing blending compound words they say aloud. Say compound words and then leave off first or second part of the compound words (e.g., Teacher says, ?say backpack? and the child responds, ?backpack.? Teacher says, ?now say backpack without back? and the child says ?pack.? Teacher says, ?say watermelon? and the child responds, ?watermelon.? Teacher says, ?now say watermelon without melon? and the child says, ?water.?). Play a clapping game, clapping once while saying each syllable in children?s names, and encourage children to join in (e.g., Lin-da gets two claps, Pat gets one clap, and Mar-ga-ret gets three claps). Provide pictures of familiar two-syllable words cut into two pieces. First model, then encourage the children to practice putting the pictures together while saying the word aloud. Provide a basket with several real items that are two or three syllables. Ask child to select one item and move the item up and down to indicate the syllables. (e.g., helicopter -?he? ?Ii? ?cop? ?tor;? tractor -?trac? ?tor?). Provide pictures of familiar one-syllable words cut into two pieces for children to put together and separate while orally blending together and taking apart the words into onset/rime segments. Have the children find the card that does not start with the same sound as the other three.

20. Demonstrates understanding of one-to-one correspondence Shows understanding of how to count and construct sets Shows understanding by participating in the comparison of quantities Assigns and relates numerical representations among numerals (written), sets of objects, and number names (spoken) in the range of five to ten 20 Reinforce the following VPK Standards skills related to Mathematics throughout the day: Supportive Instructional Strategies: When preparing for rest time, choose a different child each day to pass out one blanket for each rest mat. Count the number of boys and then girls in the group and compare the sets to determine if they are equal. Pictures can be drawn to notate each child on paper or a dry erase board, or the sets can stand side-by-side to compare. Plan activities everyday that incorporate counting sets (e.g., counting the number of markers in a box, the number of pictures in a book, or the number of children in a line). During small group, provide two sets of objects for children to compare and determine which set has more. During circle time, allow children opportunities to compare two sets of objects to determine if one set has more or if one set has less (e.g., comparing the number of boys and girls in the class). During center time, model comparing two sets of objects by counting to determine if one set has less. Model counting and using the appropriate number names (spoken) for the children during everyday activities (e.g., counting napkins for each during snack time). Encourage children to count objects (e.g., their fingers, toes, buttons on their shirt, and stripes on a flag) and point out numerals (written) in the world around them. Supportive Instructional Strategies: When preparing for rest time, choose a different child each day to pass out one blanket for each rest mat. Count the number of boys and then girls in the group and compare the sets to determine if they are equal. Pictures can be drawn to notate each child on paper or a dry erase board, or the sets can stand side-by-side to compare. Plan activities everyday that incorporate counting sets (e.g., counting the number of markers in a box, the number of pictures in a book, or the number of children in a line). During small group, provide two sets of objects for children to compare and determine which set has more. During circle time, allow children opportunities to compare two sets of objects to determine if one set has more or if one set has less (e.g., comparing the number of boys and girls in the class). During center time, model comparing two sets of objects by counting to determine if one set has less. Model counting and using the appropriate number names (spoken) for the children during everyday activities (e.g., counting napkins for each during snack time). Encourage children to count objects (e.g., their fingers, toes, buttons on their shirt, and stripes on a flag) and point out numerals (written) in the world around them.

21. Counts and knows the sequence of number names (spoken) Shows understanding of and uses appropriate terms to describe ordinal positions Shows understanding of how to combine sets and remove from a concrete set of objects (receptive knowledge) Shows understanding of addition and subtraction using a concrete set of objects (expressive knowledge) or story problems found in everyday classroom activities 21 Reinforce the following VPK Standards skills related to Mathematics throughout the day: (continued) Supportive Instructional Strategies: Count with the children as they string objects through a hole; counting through 31 (e.g., cereal, beads). During cooking activities, discuss the order that ingredients should be added to the recipe (e.g., ?First, we will add the flour. Second, we need one cup of milk. Third, we must stir in the eggs. Fourth, we will add . . . .?). When lining up for lunch, ask the children to help you count the class in a special way (e.g., ?As I touch each child gently on the shoulder, repeat what I say.? Then count each child using ordinal positions (e.g., first, second, third). Talk with children about combining sets of objects to equal a set no larger than ten (e.g., While playing in the sand table, the teacher says, ?Look, I found five white shells and two brown shells. How many shells do I have altogether??). Assist children in combining two separate sets of objects and ask if there are more (e.g., ?If we start with three blocks and then combine them with two more blocks, do we have the same amount we started with, or more??). Incorporate songs, finger plays, and games that focus on removing objects from a set no larger than ten (e.g., Five Green and Speckled Frogs, Ten in a Bed, Five Little Birdies). Talk with children about removing objects from a set no larger than ten (e.g., while playing in the sand table. Say, ?Look, I found five shells in the sand table. Then I gave two shells to a friend. How many shells do I have left??). Supportive Instructional Strategies: Count with the children as they string objects through a hole; counting through 31 (e.g., cereal, beads). During cooking activities, discuss the order that ingredients should be added to the recipe (e.g., ?First, we will add the flour. Second, we need one cup of milk. Third, we must stir in the eggs. Fourth, we will add . . . .?). When lining up for lunch, ask the children to help you count the class in a special way (e.g., ?As I touch each child gently on the shoulder, repeat what I say.? Then count each child using ordinal positions (e.g., first, second, third). Talk with children about combining sets of objects to equal a set no larger than ten (e.g., While playing in the sand table, the teacher says, ?Look, I found five white shells and two brown shells. How many shells do I have altogether??). Assist children in combining two separate sets of objects and ask if there are more (e.g., ?If we start with three blocks and then combine them with two more blocks, do we have the same amount we started with, or more??). Incorporate songs, finger plays, and games that focus on removing objects from a set no larger than ten (e.g., Five Green and Speckled Frogs, Ten in a Bed, Five Little Birdies). Talk with children about removing objects from a set no larger than ten (e.g., while playing in the sand table. Say, ?Look, I found five shells in the sand table. Then I gave two shells to a friend. How many shells do I have left??).

22. Shows an understanding of words and their meanings Child has age appropriate vocabulary across many topic areas and demonstrates a wide variety of words and their meanings within each area 22 Reinforce the following VPK Standards skills related to Oral Language/Vocabulary throughout the day: Supportive Instructional Strategies: Provide and read to children a variety of concept-related books (e.g., farm animals, vegetables, the body, fiction and nonfiction). Add new words to children?s vocabulary by using a synonym for a commonly used word. Describe children?s actions with varied descriptive words. Use puppets and props to model expressions of emotions. Provide daily experiences that introduce new vocabulary (e.g., demonstrate the concept of stability and use the word when discussing how to keep block structures. Supportive Instructional Strategies: Provide and read to children a variety of concept-related books (e.g., farm animals, vegetables, the body, fiction and nonfiction). Add new words to children?s vocabulary by using a synonym for a commonly used word. Describe children?s actions with varied descriptive words. Use puppets and props to model expressions of emotions. Provide daily experiences that introduce new vocabulary (e.g., demonstrate the concept of stability and use the word when discussing how to keep block structures.

23. Planning for Instruction 23

24. Who needs extra support? Using all of the data and looking at patterns, how can I customize instruction? What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? 24 When using the VPK Assessment reports to assist in determining instructional needs and planning for instruction, VPK teachers may use these three guiding questions: Who needs extra support? Use the Class Level Reports to determine who may need extra instructional support. Using all of the data and looking at patterns, how can I customize instruction? Using data from the VPK Assessment as well as other data teachers may have available to look at patterns to plan instruction. For example, a teacher may target instruction on letter identification for students scoring below expectations on the Print Knowledge measure. What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? The next several slides provide examples of quality instruction in the VPK classroom and practical tips for teachers as they plan instruction. When using the VPK Assessment reports to assist in determining instructional needs and planning for instruction, VPK teachers may use these three guiding questions: Who needs extra support? Use the Class Level Reports to determine who may need extra instructional support. Using all of the data and looking at patterns, how can I customize instruction? Using data from the VPK Assessment as well as other data teachers may have available to look at patterns to plan instruction. For example, a teacher may target instruction on letter identification for students scoring below expectations on the Print Knowledge measure. What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? The next several slides provide examples of quality instruction in the VPK classroom and practical tips for teachers as they plan instruction.

25. 25 What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? During Large Group. . . Activities should be adapted to meet the interests, developmental levels, and learning needs of the children. Four-year-olds are generally able to attend to activities for about 15 minutes. Teachers should watch children to see if they are actively engaged. Engaging activities hold children?s interest. A variety of literacy and math skills may be introduced through the ?Daily News.? Charts may be used for children to count and practice one-to-one correspondence. Charts may also be used to help children learn about their classmates. Using a book is one way to introduce new skills. Teachers are encouraged to incorporate stories that focus on target skills (e.g., ordinal numbers: first, second, third). Allowing children to interact with the book keeps them engaged. Activities may occur inside the classroom. Activities may also occur outside the classroom. What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? During Large Group. . . Activities should be adapted to meet the interests, developmental levels, and learning needs of the children. Four-year-olds are generally able to attend to activities for about 15 minutes. Teachers should watch children to see if they are actively engaged. Engaging activities hold children?s interest. A variety of literacy and math skills may be introduced through the ?Daily News.? Charts may be used for children to count and practice one-to-one correspondence. Charts may also be used to help children learn about their classmates. Using a book is one way to introduce new skills. Teachers are encouraged to incorporate stories that focus on target skills (e.g., ordinal numbers: first, second, third). Allowing children to interact with the book keeps them engaged. Activities may occur inside the classroom. Activities may also occur outside the classroom.

26. PowerPoint Quality Instruction During Large Group - March 2011 http://www.fldoe.org/earlylearning/assessments.asp Description: A picture walk-through large group activities/lessons in VPK classrooms across the state. Videos Compound Words ? 1 https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/ViewVideo.aspx?vc=4 Description: A VPK teacher reads a book with compound words. Using a Picture Word Wall https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/ViewVideo.aspx?vc=10 Description: A VPK teacher explains and demonstrates how she uses a picture word wall to help children with letter names and vocabulary building. 26 What does quality instruction look like during Large Group? Click on the links to view the picture walk-through and watch videos of VPK teachers implementing quality instructional practices during Large Group. What does quality instruction look like during Large Group? Click on the links to view the picture walk-through and watch videos of VPK teachers implementing quality instructional practices during Large Group.

27. 27 What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? During Small Group. . . Teacher interaction is an important part of children?s knowledge of new skills. Teacher discussion is important in understanding children?s mastery of new skills. Fingers can be used to represent a child?s understanding of number. Teachers may introduce new vocabulary and help to facilitate one-to-one correspondence while cooking. When children share their understanding, teachers can plan appropriate follow up activities. Teachers may model appropriate social skills and encourage children to use one-to-one correspondence during breakfast. A teacher made game helps with one-to-one correspondence and matching numerals with the appropriate number of objects. Charts may be used to introduce and reinforce vocabulary words. A simple poster offers a wealth of opportunities for counting and comparing sets. Teachers can facilitate language and literacy skills in the Dramatic Play area. Children should have access to a variety of interesting materials. Teacher created math tubs contain interesting objects for children to count and sort. Common objects may be used to create a variety of interesting activities. Children use common objects during planned activities. What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? During Small Group. . . Teacher interaction is an important part of children?s knowledge of new skills. Teacher discussion is important in understanding children?s mastery of new skills. Fingers can be used to represent a child?s understanding of number. Teachers may introduce new vocabulary and help to facilitate one-to-one correspondence while cooking. When children share their understanding, teachers can plan appropriate follow up activities. Teachers may model appropriate social skills and encourage children to use one-to-one correspondence during breakfast. A teacher made game helps with one-to-one correspondence and matching numerals with the appropriate number of objects. Charts may be used to introduce and reinforce vocabulary words. A simple poster offers a wealth of opportunities for counting and comparing sets. Teachers can facilitate language and literacy skills in the Dramatic Play area. Children should have access to a variety of interesting materials. Teacher created math tubs contain interesting objects for children to count and sort. Common objects may be used to create a variety of interesting activities. Children use common objects during planned activities.

28. PowerPoint Quality Instruction During Small Group - March 2011 http://www.fldoe.org/earlylearning/assessments.asp Description: A picture walk-through small group activities/lessons in VPK classrooms across the state. Videos Initial Sounds https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/ViewVideo.aspx?vc=6 Description: A VPK teacher teaches children about initial sounds in words that match or don't match, in a group setting. Learning Letter Names https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/ViewVideo.aspx?vc=8 Description: A VPK teacher shares and demonstrates how she teaches about alphabet letters through singing, vocabulary building, and working with playdough. 28 What does quality instruction look like during Small Group? Click on the links to view the picture walk-through and watch videos of VPK teachers incorporating quality instructional practices during Small Group. What does quality instruction look like during Small Group? Click on the links to view the picture walk-through and watch videos of VPK teachers incorporating quality instructional practices during Small Group.

29. 29 What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? During Transitions. . . Children are prepared for changes in the classroom when teachers plan for them ahead of time. A classroom schedule helps children to organize their day. A schedule with pictures helps children anticipate what will happen next. A simple sticky note is used to create an intentional teaching opportunity. The sticky note tells the children how many to count at the snack table. Number words and numerals in order on the floor organize children during line up. Teacher interaction helps to facilitate smooth transitions. Children may review vocabulary words as they line up at the door. Teachers may use a variety of activities to engage the children. Classroom helpers may also model appropriate behavior. A center chart helps children move independently in the classroom. A sign uses dots and a numeral to show how many children may play in the center. A sign uses numerals to show how many children may play in the center. An organized and labeled math manipulative shelf makes clean up time easier. Children can sort materials by color during clean up time. Teachers model appropriate behavior for children. Children are more comfortable when they know what to do. What does quality instruction look like in the VPK classroom? During Transitions. . . Children are prepared for changes in the classroom when teachers plan for them ahead of time. A classroom schedule helps children to organize their day. A schedule with pictures helps children anticipate what will happen next. A simple sticky note is used to create an intentional teaching opportunity. The sticky note tells the children how many to count at the snack table. Number words and numerals in order on the floor organize children during line up. Teacher interaction helps to facilitate smooth transitions. Children may review vocabulary words as they line up at the door. Teachers may use a variety of activities to engage the children. Classroom helpers may also model appropriate behavior. A center chart helps children move independently in the classroom. A sign uses dots and a numeral to show how many children may play in the center. A sign uses numerals to show how many children may play in the center. An organized and labeled math manipulative shelf makes clean up time easier. Children can sort materials by color during clean up time. Teachers model appropriate behavior for children. Children are more comfortable when they know what to do.

30. PowerPoint Quality Instruction During Transitions - March 2011 http://www.fldoe.org/earlylearning/assessments.asp Description: A picture walk-through transition activities in VPK classrooms across the state. Videos Syllable Segmentation https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/ViewVideo.aspx?vc=5 Description: A VPK teacher explains and demonstrates an activity called Junk Box Rock to help children with syllable segmentation. Using Children's Names https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/ViewVideo.aspx?vc=9 Description: A VPK teacher uses children?s names to learn and review initial letters. 30 What does quality instruction look like during Transitions? Click on the links to view the picture walk-through and watch videos of VPK teachers using quality instructional practices during Transitions. NOTE: The activity in the Using Children's Names video could easily be used during classroom transitions (e.g., centers, playground, lunch). What does quality instruction look like during Transitions? Click on the links to view the picture walk-through and watch videos of VPK teachers using quality instructional practices during Transitions. NOTE: The activity in the Using Children's Names video could easily be used during classroom transitions (e.g., centers, playground, lunch).

31. Instructional Resources 31

32. Selection of Available Resources 32 Curriculum What is available within the curriculum currently used? What professional development and/or resources are available from the publisher? Early Learning Coalition/District Resources What professional development and/or resources are available? Additional Resources What additional resources are available to help me plan instruction for my class? Guiding questions for selecting appropriate resources include: What is available within the curriculum currently used? What professional development and/or resources are available from the publisher? What professional development and/or resources are available from the early learning coalition or school district? What additional resources are available to help me plan instruction for my class? Guiding questions for selecting appropriate resources include: What is available within the curriculum currently used? What professional development and/or resources are available from the publisher? What professional development and/or resources are available from the early learning coalition or school district? What additional resources are available to help me plan instruction for my class?

33. Additional Resources (continued) Websites Bright Beginnings https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/Default.aspx Literacy Essentials and Reading Network (LEaRN) http://www.justreadflorida.com/LEaRN/ VPK Teacher Toolkit http://www.flvpkonline.org/teachertoolkit/ Language and Vocabulary folder Mathematical Thinking folder 33 Additional Resources Websites Bright Beginnings https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/Default.aspx This website provides resources and strategies designed to help teachers customize instruction for individual students. Literacy Essentials and Reading Network (LEaRN) http://www.justreadflorida.com/LEaRN/ The Literacy Essentials and Reading Network (LEaRN) is a free website for principals, reading coaches, and classroom teachers to access scientifically based reading instruction implemented in classrooms through video clips. Note: All users must register to access the free resources. VPK Teacher Toolkit http://www.flvpkonline.org/teachertoolkit/ This toolkit is designed to meet the needs of directors, teachers, assistants, and parents to support early learning in the VPK classroom.? Folders include content in targeted areas; Language and Vocabulary, Emergent Literacy, Mathematical Thinking, The Florida VPK Assessment, and English Language Learners. Each folder aligns with the VPK Education Standards and provides information, video, and resources that support VPK teachers as they plan for instruction with their children.? New information and resources will be added to folders as it becomes available. Language and Vocabulary folder The Language and Vocabulary folder provides instructional strategies for increasing language and vocabulary with young children. These strategies include Book Embedded Vocabulary Instruction, Dialogic Reading, Think, Show, Tell, Talk and Language Scaffolding with young children. There are videos of VPK teachers implementing the strategies with children, in addition to, activities, and resources to support teachers as they begin to use the language and vocabulary strategies in their own classrooms. Mathematical Thinking folder The Mathematical Thinking folder provides resources, instructional strategies, and activities for each of the six areas of Mathematical Thinking outlined in the VPK Standards. These areas are: Number Sense, Number and Operations, Patterns and Seriation, Geometry, Spatial Relations, and Measurement. There are instructional videos by an expert in the field about mathematical thinking, as well as VPK teachers introducing and teaching mathematical concepts to children. The folder also includes resources to support teachers in the area of Mathematical Thinking. Additional Resources Websites Bright Beginnings https://brightbeginningsfl.org/Instruction/Default.aspx This website provides resources and strategies designed to help teachers customize instruction for individual students. Literacy Essentials and Reading Network (LEaRN) http://www.justreadflorida.com/LEaRN/ The Literacy Essentials and Reading Network (LEaRN) is a free website for principals, reading coaches, and classroom teachers to access scientifically based reading instruction implemented in classrooms through video clips. Note: All users must register to access the free resources. VPK Teacher Toolkit http://www.flvpkonline.org/teachertoolkit/ This toolkit is designed to meet the needs of directors, teachers, assistants, and parents to support early learning in the VPK classroom.? Folders include content in targeted areas; Language and Vocabulary, Emergent Literacy, Mathematical Thinking, The Florida VPK Assessment, and English Language Learners. Each folder aligns with the VPK Education Standards and provides information, video, and resources that support VPK teachers as they plan for instruction with their children.? New information and resources will be added to folders as it becomes available. Language and Vocabulary folder The Language and Vocabulary folder provides instructional strategies for increasing language and vocabulary with young children. These strategies include Book Embedded Vocabulary Instruction, Dialogic Reading, Think, Show, Tell, Talk and Language Scaffolding with young children. There are videos of VPK teachers implementing the strategies with children, in addition to, activities, and resources to support teachers as they begin to use the language and vocabulary strategies in their own classrooms. Mathematical Thinking folder The Mathematical Thinking folder provides resources, instructional strategies, and activities for each of the six areas of Mathematical Thinking outlined in the VPK Standards. These areas are: Number Sense, Number and Operations, Patterns and Seriation, Geometry, Spatial Relations, and Measurement. There are instructional videos by an expert in the field about mathematical thinking, as well as VPK teachers introducing and teaching mathematical concepts to children. The folder also includes resources to support teachers in the area of Mathematical Thinking.

34. 34 The Florida Department of Education, Office of Early Learning offers a variety of both online and instructor-led professional development opportunities. This chart provides a listing of resources aligned to the VPK Assessment Measures. For a comprehensive listing of current instructor-led and online training opportunities for directors, teachers, assistants and parents offered by the Florida Department of Education please visit the Office of Early Learning website at the web address provided. The Florida Department of Education, Office of Early Learning offers a variety of both online and instructor-led professional development opportunities. This chart provides a listing of resources aligned to the VPK Assessment Measures. For a comprehensive listing of current instructor-led and online training opportunities for directors, teachers, assistants and parents offered by the Florida Department of Education please visit the Office of Early Learning website at the web address provided.

35. Florida Department of Education Office of Early Learning 1-866-447-1159 VPKAssessment@fldoe.org www.fldoe.org/earlylearning Contact Information 35 This concludes the VPK Assessment Instructional Implications presentation for Assessment Period 2. The information provided will assist educators with the interpretation of Assessment Period 2 VPK Assessment data. For additional information, please feel free to contact the Florida Department of Education, Office of Early Learning at the toll-free number provided or by email. This concludes the VPK Assessment Instructional Implications presentation for Assessment Period 2. The information provided will assist educators with the interpretation of Assessment Period 2 VPK Assessment data. For additional information, please feel free to contact the Florida Department of Education, Office of Early Learning at the toll-free number provided or by email.


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