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“COMMUNICATION FOR CHANGE” UN RETREAT DAY 1. Kievits Kroon Country Estate 3 May 2007. DAY ONE AM SEATING PLAN. Table #1. Table #3. Raabya Amijad (Pak) Sari Bjornholm (CV) Caroline Den Dulk (Viet) Eshila Maravanyika (Tanz) Frederik Matthys (RW) Luis Zaqueu (Moz) Corinne Perthuis (ILO)

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“COMMUNICATION FOR CHANGE” UN RETREAT DAY 1

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Communication for change un retreat day 1

“COMMUNICATION FOR CHANGE”UN RETREATDAY 1

Kievits Kroon Country Estate

3 May 2007


Day one am seating plan

DAY ONE AM SEATING PLAN

Table #1

Table #3

Raabya Amijad (Pak)

Sari Bjornholm (CV)

Caroline Den Dulk (Viet)

Eshila Maravanyika (Tanz)

Frederik Matthys (RW)

Luis Zaqueu (Moz)

Corinne Perthuis (ILO)

Cassandra Waldon (UNDP)

Thierry Delvigne-Jean (Moz)

Tahiro Gouro (CV)

Eldisa Lloshi (Alb)

Silvia da Rin Pagnetto (Uru)

Theresa Smout (Tanz)

Nguyen Thi Ngoc Van (Viet)

Nick Parsons (FAO)

Peter Smerdon (WFP)

Table #2

Michael Coleman (Viet)

Nora Kushti (Alb)

Cyriaque Ngoboka (RW)

Peter Reeh (Moz)

Zarak Saleem Jan (Pak)

Esteban Zunin (Uru)

Nora Godwin (UNICEF)

Manoel de A. e S. (DPI)


Introduction objectives

INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES

  • Introductory remarks

  • Three objectives:

    • To develop a shared understanding of communication challenges and opportunities associated with ‘One UN’ implementation

      • Including best practices sharing

    • To assist pilot countries in strategic communications planning

      • Identification of audiences, messages and channels for effective external and internal communication on the “One UN” pilots

    • To strengthen participants’ ability to use communication as an effective tool for implementing UN reform

      • Hands-on training component

  • Kick-off

  • Your name and role

  • “Two truths and a lie”

  • The one most important thing you want to get out of this retreat


Map of today

MAP OF TODAY

18:00

Concrete steps and activities in 2007 (and beyond)

5

4

Sharing communication experiences

Coffee

Break

~4:15

3

Strategic communication tools

Lunch

~13:15

2

Approaching change from communication perspective

Coffee

Break

~11:30

1

Opening discussion on opportunities and challenges

Ensure agreement on objectives

0

8:45


Preview plan for tomorrow saturday

PREVIEW: PLAN FOR TOMORROW & SATURDAY

5

Focal point networking session

~17:00

4

Wrap-up, support needs, next steps

Role-plays, refinement of comm plans

3

Lunch

~13:15

2

Working groups: developing comm plans

Coffee

Break

1

Internal & external stakeholders and views

Friday

Saturday

Introduction, review of objectives & format

Hands-on communication training

0

8:30


Communication for change un retreat day 1

SPIRIT OF THIS RETREAT: KEEP AN OPEN MIND, BE CREATIVE!Even After Knowing The Facts You Can Still See Things Differently

Both horizontal lines are the same length

“You don’t see the world as it is, you see it as you are” – Kant

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 56-59


Thinking creatively can be about seeing what lies in front of our eyes

THINKING CREATIVELY CAN BE ABOUT SEEING WHAT LIES IN FRONT OF OUR EYES

Task

  • This is a picture taken from a book published in Africa a long time ago

  • Can you tell in what environment the characters are?

  • Is the family inside or outside of the building?

Again, we don’t see the picture as it is, we see it as we are

Source:“Perception and Creativity", L. de Brabandere, May 2006


The un the reform agenda and communications

THE UN, THE REFORM AGENDA AND COMMUNICATIONS

  • Rubric:

    • Facilitator to present ideas as needed to spark discussion

    • Identify a spokesperson for each table

    • Each table to discuss current status (~15min)

    • Spokesperson raises three key questions/issues for table, followed by discussion (~10min each)

  • Question guide:

    • Why are we here? – What are the key communications opportunities and challenges relating to ‘One UN’?

    • Is it all clear – what needs clarification?

    • Our vision – how do we imagine the end result of the change process (relating to communication)?


Background rationale for one un

BACKGROUND: RATIONALE FOR ‘ONE UN’

Problems

Diagnosis

Solution

  • Unrealized synergies

    • fragmented plans & programmes

  • Blurred accountability & responsibility

    • RC role, relationship to UNCT & RDT

  • Complex, un-adaptive interfaces

    • to customers (governments)

    • to donors

  • Unnecessary cost

    • duplicated activities & support

  • Opaque economics

    • UNCT funding and outputs

Diluted and

ill-defined UN

value proposition

  • ‘One UN’ – retaining diversity while delivering as one

  • One Leader

  • One Programme

  • One Office

  • One Budgetary framework


Hlp recommendations reflect changing world and accelerate ongoing reform agenda

1997

2001

2004

2005

2006

HLP RECOMMENDATIONS REFLECT CHANGING WORLD AND ACCELERATE ONGOING REFORM AGENDA

Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness

2005 World Summit – assessment of MDG progress

2000 Millennium Summit – creation of MDGs

Major Events /

UN Reform Reports

HLP on systems coherence report

Creation of UNDG

ECOSOC recommendations

TCPR(JO request initially made)

Implementationof CCA and UNDAF processes

Common services pilot, leading to strategy (2001-03)

Common country programming process launched

First JO launched: Cape Verde

Reform initiatives

Eight ‘One UN’ Pilots


Communication for change un retreat day 1

HQ INTERVIEWS GAVE INSIGHTS ON PROBLEM DIAGNOSIS, SUCCESS STORIES AND IMPLEMENTATION BARRIERSHighlights of What We Heard From UN Stakeholders

  • Key problems of status quo in programming, operations, branding and interfacing

    • Limited joint programming (“Reality is integrated...we disaggregate it”)

    • Inefficient back office (“We look foolish to recipients and donors by duplicating operational activities”)

    • Distinct brands but lack of unity (“UN spends a lot of money on flags, not on product”)

    • High interfacing transaction costs (“Small countries just can’t cope with so many agencies”)

  • Success stories driven by joint programming, common services and attention to government needs

    • Cross-cutting issues like HIV / AIDS drive programming coordination (“Issues, not agencies, drive cooperation”)

    • Significant cost savings found in back office (e.g., common mailroom services)

    • Governments drive JO forward when they feel their needs are addressed and views considered

  • Implementation barriers include issues of fiscal authority, agency visibility, RC role and legal status

    • “Common budget framework” vs. unified budget

    • Fears for visibility drive some opposition (“UNDP is now the only brand seen”)

    • RC role must be neutral, and capable of providing technical leadership

    • Legal issues resulted in the “support agency model”, with significant HR concerns

At stake could be the relevance of the UN: “If the UN is not attractive enough, we [the donors] can give our money to other players”

Source:Interviews


Key considerations for all pilots

KEY CONSIDERATIONS FOR ALL PILOTS

  • Need to move forward swiftly but carefully – “rush slowly”

    • Shared appetite for pilots to move as swiftly as possible (and all are at different starting points)

    • Enabled by agency permission to experiment beyond existing practices (systems, processes, etc)

    • At the same time, careful planning (implementation, communications) will help avoid missteps

  • Need to ensure clear and frequent communication

    • Resolve as much uncertainty as possible about plans going forward – ensure UN country staff, agency HQ, RDTs and others are aligned

    • Provide transparency and formal consultative discussions to involve government in implementation

    • Desire for as much inclusivity as possible (while “rushing slowly”)

  • Need to build appropriate governance

    • Process remains as locally-driven as possible, now with defined channel for receiving support and guidance from HQ (and clear role for RDTs)

  • Need appropriate “freedoms” and authority

    • e.g. Freedom to define communications messaging locally within country teams, or among the communications focal points


Some key questions for all pilots

SOME KEY QUESTIONS FOR ALL PILOTS

  • How to decide what priorities go into “strategic core” section of “One Programme”?

  • How to synthesize key elements of existing country planning documents? “UNDAF-down” approach vs “joint programmes-up” approach?

  • How to meaningfully institutionalize elements of “One Leader”?

  • How to scope and build out the required RCO functions?

  • How to engage the entire staff at country level?

  • How to establish the right “freedoms” for country teams?

  • How to develop effective partnerships with each other, with government & donors?

  • How to CHANGE?!

What does it mean for pilot communications?


Session i communications as key to successful change management

SESSION I: COMMUNICATIONS AS KEY TO SUCCESSFUL CHANGE MANAGEMENT

“Mobilize the organization”

2

  • Engage senior leaders

  • Align stakeholder beliefs & behavior

  • Recognize & manage the emotional journey

  • Gauge readiness. willingness, ability

“Create changeagenda”

“Sustain change”

5

  • Monitor and refine change management capabilities

  • Start to close identified capability gaps

  • Identify and propagate best practices

  • Create burning platform

  • Build compelling vision

  • Translate vision into manageable change initiatives

1

“Hardwire change”

3

  • Align organization design

  • Align HR processes and performance management, IT & finance systems

“Manage for results”

  • Provide governance, project management

  • Design roadmaps to deliver results

  • Rigorous monitoring, progress tracking

  • Conduct capacity assessments

4

  • “Communicate continuously and intensively”

6

  • Create and execute internal & external communications plans, aligning stakeholders

  • Define and communicate minimum acceptable standards and principles

  • Establish knowledge-sharing mechanisms

Source:BCG case experience, Sirkin, Keenan & Jackson, “The Hard Side of Change Management” (HBR 2005) and Ostroff, “change Management in Government” (HBR 2006)


What is change management

WHAT IS CHANGE MANAGEMENT?

  • Change Management (CM) is providing structuredsupport as an organization implements an initiative or a program of well planned initiatives along a set pathway, to realize its vision and thereby fundamentally improve its performance

  • As the UN looks to implement the One UN reform initiative:

    • It will require structured support through coordination along the various One UN dimensions, as well as liaising with HQ and monitoring and evaluating the changes and results

    • It will progress along a pathway of capturing key lessons learned from a set of pilot countries, driven through country-specific actions and changes, which can then be shared with all other member countries

    • It will move towards the vision of operating as one cohesive unit, both programmatically and operationally, at the country level and transcending all agency mandates and boundaries

    • It will fundamentally improve the ability of the UN to effectively serve the needs of its beneficiaries through the optimal use of its resources and capabilities


Communication for change un retreat day 1

Changing Reality

Change

Time

ANOTHER WAY OF THINKING ABOUT CHANGE: THERE ARE TWO TYPES, STARTING WITH ‘REALITY’

Changing REALITY

Is called INNOVATION

Requires action

The process is continuous

Its impact should be measured

Takes a long time

Delivers something new to the system

Is a challenge for a team

Project management is required

The fuel is practical ideas and useful suggestions

But retroactive feedback protects the system and helps it keep its balance, “the more something changes, the more it becomes the same”

Please compare this slide with following one

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 9,14


Communication for change un retreat day 1

Changing Perception

Change

Time

SECOND TYPE OF CHANGE: CHANGE IN PERCEPTION (A JOB FOR COMMUNICATIONS TEAMS!)

Changing PERCEPTION

Is called CREATIVITY

Requires thinking

The process is discontinuous

Its impact cannot be measured

Takes an instant

Envisions a new system

Is a challenge for an individual

Brainstorming is required

The fuel is questions, surprises, strange and incomplete ideas

For this change in perception to happen at least one of the system’s rules – a hypothesis, a judgment or a stereotype – has to be broken

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 9,14


Both types of change are needed to create impact

BOTH TYPES OF CHANGE ARE NEEDED TO CREATE IMPACT

Changing Reality

Changing Perception

  • Examples

Creating

‘One UN’

  • Making people see themselves as part of a new and different entity

  • Harrmonizing business processes, common M&E, developing strong TWGs and joint programmes

Company going

global

  • Opening new branches and stores around the world

  • People seeing other country offices as being part of the same company

Even in a personal level in order to create real impact you need to change both...

Learning to

be punctual

  • Using an appointment book, waking up earlier, scheduling time between meetings

  • Seeing punctuality as more efficient

Learning

French

  • Taking private lessons

  • Falling in love with a French girlfriend!!!

If you want to change, you need to change twice: not only the

reality of the situation but also the perception of this reality

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 7-8


Communication for change un retreat day 1

Change

New Strategic Vision

Old Strategic Vision

Time

TO CHANGE IS TO CHANGE TWICE: PERCEPTION AND REALITY AChange in Perception is Required for a New Strategic Vision to Emerge

Two Types Of Change

Tools For Change

Change in Perception

1

New Strategic Vision

Change

Creativity

Old Strategic Vision

Time

Change in Reality

2

Change

Innovation

Time

Two processes with different characteristics

Source:"The forgotten half of change“, L. de Brabandere


The new strategic vision represents the change in perception and allows further changes in reality

Change

7

World that changes

12

10

11

New good idea

Reality

9

Judgment

5

3

New ideas

2

Imagination

8

1

4

6

7

Perception

World that changes

Time

THE NEW STRATEGIC VISION REPRESENTS THE CHANGE IN PERCEPTION AND ALLOWS FURTHER CHANGES IN REALITY

New

Strategic

Vision

Source:"The forgotten half of change”, L. de Brabandere


Paradigm shift example bic

Influence

Example

PARADIGM SHIFT EXAMPLE: BIC

Consumer Needs

Change

Ideas

New Vision:

“We Can Produce Disposable”

Megatrends

Lighters

Razors

Reality

Old Vision:

“Our Business Is Writing”

Perception

Consumer Needs

Pens

Time


Paradigm shift example google

Influence

Example

PARADIGM SHIFT EXAMPLE: GOOGLE

IT Trends

Change

Ideas

New Vision:

“We Should Know Everything”

Megatrends

Google

Earth

Reality

Old Vision:

“Let’s Make The Best Search Engine”

Perception

IT Trends

Google

Google

Desktop

Time


Communication for change un retreat day 1

CHANGE IN REALITY NEEDS TO BE PROTECTED FROM RISKS BY RIGOROUS PROJECT MANAGEMENT

...addressed by project management

  • Coordinate senior-level engagement to create buy-in

  • Identify and engage opinion leaders within the UNCT

  • Ensure clarity on governance of project management (scope, deliverables)

Risks to changing reality...

Lack of

Buy-in

1

Change

  • Steer towards key milestones using tracking systems

  • Manage issue resolution process

  • Clarify what is needed, from who, and when

Unclear

deliverables

3

2

No up-front

planning

  • Allocate sufficient time to set up tracking systems

  • Identify and lock down key metrics, milestones, interdependencies, etc.

  • Dedicate personnel to tracking

Time


Communication for change un retreat day 1

CHANGES IN PERCEPTION ARE PROMOTED AND DEFENDED BY INTENSIVE COMMUNICATION

...under threat...

...and addressed by communications

  • Lack of internal buy-in to new vision

    • “My agency remains my top priority”

  • Consistent messaging and support for ‘One UN’ sought from agency HQ

  • Regular and frequent communications

Changing Perception...

Change

  • Emotions cloud perceptions

    • “I can’t buy in: what’s happening with my job?”

  • Regular communication, even when nothing is certain

  • Build trust through consistent messaging

  • Lack of external recognition

    • “We don’t understand ‘One UN’ – you still seem the same”

  • Appropriate media channel for external sources

  • Regular and frequent communications

  • Consistent messaging

Time

Need for a communications plan, addressing threats with defined stakeholders, media, message and frequency


Coffee break

COFFEE BREAK


Changing perception is a difficult task our brain is designed to think in a certain way

IDEA

CHANGING PERCEPTION IS A DIFFICULT TASKOur Brain is Designed to Think in a Certain Way

  • Changing perception becomes difficult because:

    • Although the world has been changing, the human brain has remained the same

    • The human brain is “hard wired” to think in a certain way (“laws of perception”)

    • Perception is linked and influenced by culture

    • Brain creates patterns for us

Although you see a rectangle, one doesn’t exist

Your brain prefers to see a square, but there is no square

And there is no white bar!!!

Our brain looks for patterns under each condition and tries to

“finish the history”, this behavior is ruled by the laws of perception

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 7-8


Optical illusions teach us also that our way of seeing the world is governed by strange laws

OPTICAL ILLUSIONS TEACH US ALSO THAT OUR WAY OF SEEING THE WORLD IS GOVERNED BY STRANGE LAWS

Can you see the grey dots at the intersections?...

...but if you try to focus on one grey dot it will disappear

It is not so obvious...

But the circles in the centers are of the same size

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 50, 51


Beware the way you see the world

BEWARE THE WAY YOU SEE THE WORLD

Seeing vs.

Perceiving

  • Our perception deforms things, foreshortens and fogs our view, leads us into errors

    • Just need to buy a car model X to start seeing more and more of them on the roads

Seeing vs.

Believing

  • One’s convictions get caught up in the story too, we believe what we see, but sometimes we see what we believe

    • When you believe someone is good you “see” his/her goodness

Seeing vs.

Knowing

  • What we have experienced or learned in the past forms the “axes” of our system of seeing or analyzing things in the future

Seeing vs.

Hoping

  • We see and we believe much more easily what we want to be true

    • The sales of economic newspapers go up when the stock exchange does well

“You don’t see the world as it is, you see it as you are” – the same is true of audiences for your communications!

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 56-59


Communication for change un retreat day 1

DRIVING TO A NEW IDEA IS ABOUT FINDING A NEW FORMCommunicating One Detail Can Change the Perception of the Whole

What is this? The beginning of a map, a maze, the letter “H”?

Once the “H” is seen, it is difficult to return to “simply 3 unconnected lines”

By adding an additional line (change in form) the idea of the “H” is destroyed...

...but the idea of the maze moves forward

As with the “H” image, once you see or have an idea,

there is something irreversible about it

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 49, 50


Communication for change un retreat day 1

UNDER THE PRESENCE OF AMBIGUITY SOME SITUATIONS CAN BE PERCEIVED AND INTERPRETED IN MORE THAN ONE WAYWhat Do You See?

There are obviously two ways of seeing this image: as a cup or as two faces!


An exercise what do you see a collection of black smudges

AN EXERCISE: WHAT DO YOU SEE? A Collection Of Black Smudges?

Stop for a while and give yourself a second opportunity...

try to construct a coherent whole, but this process is complicated

because you don’t know what you are looking for

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 51, 52


Again all of a sudden an image appears

A Cowboy on Horseback Facing to the Left?

AGAIN, ALL OF A SUDDEN AN IMAGE APPEARS

Six analogies between construction

of images and ideas:

  • You will never see them if you don’t believe they exist

  • They are difficult to find

  • It’s easier in a group

  • They have an irreversible trait to them

  • They appear all of a sudden

  • Both, the new image and new idea are made up of elements that are not in themselves new

1

2

3

4

5

6

Finding patterns and coherency is a good way of thinking, BUT

this brain’s persistence can inhibit our ability to find new ideas...

Source:"The forgotten half of change", L. de Brabandere, Pages 51, 52


Key takeaways of this section

KEY TAKEAWAYS OF THIS SECTION

  • Perception is governed by laws

  • Some of them are “hardware” (optical illusions) but most of them “software” (how we have become programmed)

  • You don’t see the world as it is, you see it as you are

  • Ambiguity can make us perceive the same thing in different ways

  • We tend to think using forms: stereotypes, patterns and paradigms

  • Bad decisions are not necessarily due to lack of information, but often to the way our mind works


Session i continued successfully handling communication in change efforts

SESSION I CONTINUED: SUCCESSFULLY HANDLING COMMUNICATION IN CHANGE EFFORTS

Feedback loops

Start with the "Desired Outcome"

Get to know your audience

Develop communication strategy

Ensure effective execution

Measure and

follow up


Communication for change un retreat day 1

Today's situation

"Desired outcome"

START FROM THE "DESIRED OUTCOME"You always communicate for a purpose, not for the sake of communicating

What new ways of working, thinking, behaving do we want to see implemented? When? By who?

Where do we stand today? What can we build on? What needs to change?

How to build communication to support reaching the desired outcome?


Get to know your audience

GET TO KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE

Good preliminary audience analysis allows you to...

  • Use available resources in the most effective way

    • Don't attempt to do everything

    • Be proactive where it counts

  • Focus time and energy

    • Differentiate type and intensity of intervention over time, i.e. who’s first, needed later, etc.

  • Prioritize efforts

    • Design quick wins and long-term approach


Strategic communications planning

STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS PLANNING

Approach

Impact on One UN Programme at Country Level

  • Develop communication plan

    • Ensure clear senior ownership of content and prepare for their role in communication

    • Define audiences

    • Assess communicational needs (media, frequency, message) for each audience

    • Make detailed communication plan

      • process sequence, timeline and accountabilities

    • Align with internal communications department and external agencies

  • Execute communication plan

    • Rigorous execution of communication plan

    • Align communication initiatives with the 'central’ HQ communication plan

  • Monitor results

    • Observe and measure employee perception

    • Safeguard correct information flows

1

Entire UN organization, across agencies, becomes committed and shares goals

Employees and all relevant stakeholders (i.e. government, NGO’s) involved and appropriately targeted with key messages

Clear agreement on tasks and responsibilities within UN communications team

Well informed staff, leading to shared vision, and commitment to change

UNCT leadership aware of 'change morale' amongst staff

2

3


First step identification of relevant stakeholders and concerns

FIRST STEP: IDENTIFICATION OF RELEVANT STAKEHOLDERS AND CONCERNS

Stakeholders

Potential concerns?

  • UNCT & UN staff in-country

  • Host governments

  • Donors

  • Wider UN system

  • ...

  • Job security, process complexity

  • Weakening the UN

  • Evidence of progress

  • Perceptions of UN reform

  • ...

Other stakeholder groups as well, subsets of the ones above, etc


Appropriate media channel for each group determined by consideration of formality and reach

US

UK

UK

Com toolkit

APPROPRIATE MEDIA CHANNEL FOR EACH GROUP DETERMINED BY CONSIDERATION OF FORMALITY AND REACH

Formal

Presentations

Letter to staff

Benefits of One UN

Every month ?

By field office or HQ?

For children

For HQ

For UNCT

For gov.

Media

Discussions

(one to one or group)

Voice messages /

Conference calls

  • Key messages

    • Objectives

    • Rationale

  • Key staff concerns to address

Informal

One to One

One to Many

Reach

Existing media to be leveraged where appropriate


Identification of available media

IDENTIFICATION OF AVAILABLE MEDIA

Examples of top-down communications

Examples of interactive communications

  • Formal memo updates / announcements

  • Bulletin board announcements

  • Emails

  • Newsletter articles (share success stories)

  • Management presentations

    • Department meetings

    • Staff meetings

  • Formal training sessions (large / small groups)

    • New processes, forms, schedules

  • Internet

  • FAQs

  • Small group / department discussions

  • Focus groups

  • One-on-ones with vocal resistors

  • Telephone briefings / surveys

  • Pilot group feedback sessions

    • What’s working / not working

  • Web surveys / pulse checks

    • Good for questions about attitudes and motivations, impact of change

  • Anonymous question / suggestion box

  • Team-building / trust-building activities

Which ones are at your disposal? Goal should be to use wide range of media as appropriate, but with consistent message


Define communication frequency and media channel for each stakeholder group

DEFINE COMMUNICATION FREQUENCY AND MEDIA CHANNEL FOR EACH STAKEHOLDER GROUP

Frequency

Media

  • Agency HQ

  • ...

  • ...

  • Regional Leadership

  • ...

  • ...

  • HQ etc

  • DGO, CEB, SG

  • ...

  • ...

  • Senior Management

  • ...

  • ...

  • All pilot staff

  • ...

  • ...

  • Pilot

  • Country

  • Key Opinion Leaders

  • ...

  • ...

  • Staff At Risk

  • ...

  • ...


Profile current communications to identify gaps

PROFILE CURRENT COMMUNICATIONS TO IDENTIFY GAPS

Example: Internal UN Stakeholders

What conclusions can we draw?

Formal

  • Need increase in informal, one-to-one support being generated

  • Need additional sources for informal and widespread distribution of information (Intranet site)

  • Need more targeted one-to-one, formal communications to bolster buy-in across the system

  • ...

UN

retreats

Mgmt

Reports

All staff

bulletin

News

Letters

Extranet

site

Media

Intranet

site

Informal

One to One

One to Many

Reach

Audience

Senior management

All staff


Develop relevant messages per target group

DEVELOP RELEVANT MESSAGES PER TARGET GROUP

  • Key questions to ask:

    • What do I want my audience to know/feel/do/remember ?

    • What does my audience know about the topic ?

    • What do they need/want to know ?

    • What are my audience's concerns, fears, hopes related to the topic ?

    • What "trading" possibilities do I have ?

      • what does the audience need/want that we can offer ?

    • How do they like to get information?

    • How do we get feedback from them?

    • ...

  • Common ways to fail...

  • Communicate “management” values, not employee values

  • Use “management” language, not employee language

  • Ignore implications in day-to-day actions

  • Present in stiff, easy to ignore manner


Template for pilot communications strategies

TEMPLATE FOR PILOT COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES

Comms

plan

Audience

Perception

Objective

Key message

Channel

Owner / Spoke-people

Action

Timing / Location

Supporting material

Measure-ment

Remarks

Govern-ment

Key opinion leaders (UNCT)

All Pilot staff

Donors


Checklist communications plan should answer all these questions

CHECKLIST: COMMUNICATIONS PLAN SHOULD ANSWER ALL THESE QUESTIONS

  • Do we know what the preferred communication approach and tools are?

  • Do we know what has already been communicated about the project (internally and externally) and how things were received?

  • Is top management aware of the necessity and impact of communication? Are they ready to invest time and effort in communication?

    ***

  • Do we have a clear idea of who the various target groups/stakeholders are, what they know, how they feel, what they expect?

  • Do we know what our goals are for each group?

  • Is there an overall communication plan for the duration of the change effort? Are the immediate short-term steps fully detailed, agreed upon and prepared (dates, sequence, for whom, what, by whom, end-products, follow-up, ...)?

  • Do we have the tools/processes in place to measure the effects of the communication (feed-back loop) and ensure corrective actions are taken?

    ***

  • Are the external and internal communication approach/messages coherent and coordinated?


Collect feedback and act on it

COLLECT FEEDBACKAnd act on it !

Ways to collect feedback

Formal

  • Surveys (written, web-based, telephone, ...)

  • Written evaluations/comments

  • Performance reviews; 360 feedback

  • Pulse checks

  • Feedback collected during meetings or gatherings

  • Field visits

  • One-to-one interviews

  • Focus groups

  • Eating in employee restaurants and understanding “word on the street” / rumours

Informal


Key success factors for intensive communications

KEY SUCCESS FACTORS FOR INTENSIVE COMMUNICATIONS

Process success factors

Content success factors

Make sure to involve top management in the communication process

Acknowledge past projects, efforts, successes

1

6

Make sure to involve HR in the processto validate approach with them (staff associations, etc.)

Put yourself in the shoes of the receiver: how would you react to the message?

2

7

Anticipate and measure: Communication is about 'action/reaction'

Keep in mind that people's first question is: what's in it for me?

3

8

Make sure your communication is followed up by action: make it real to build trust

Link project with other initiatives in the organization:How does it all fit and make sense?

4

9

Listen ! And allow for interaction andtwo-way communication

Make messages as concrete as possible

5

10

Remember, you can never communicate enough...


Some final thoughts don t fall prey to communication myths

SOME FINAL THOUGHTS:DON'T FALL PREY TO COMMUNICATION MYTHS

  • The following myths are very prevalent and they are absolutely wrong. If you find yourself thinking these things, an alarm bell needs to go off!

    • We want to wait until we are ready with all the answers before we communicate

    • We aren't communicating because we haven't said anything yet

    • The only people we need to be concerned about are the ones who are participating now

    • We don't need to communicate because there is nothing new

    • We've addressed this before so it's done

    • They know what we know; all they're interested in is the results

    • It's someone else's job to communicate

    • It may have taken us months to figure this out, but you can get it in one presentation/article/conversation


Lunch

LUNCH


Day one pm seating plan

DAY ONE PM SEATING PLAN

Table #1

Table #3

Sari Bjornholm (CV)

Cyriaque Ngoboka (RW)

Caroline Den Dulk (Viet)

Eshila Maravanyika (Tanz)

Silvia da Rin Pagnetto (Uru)

Luis Zaqueu (Moz)

Cassandra Waldon (UNDP)

Nick Parsons (FAO)

Thierry Delvigne-Jean (Moz)

Tahiro Gouro (CV)

Eldisa Lloshi (Alb)

Zarak Saleem Jan (Pak)

Theresa Smout (Tanz)

Michael Coleman (Viet)

Manoel de A. e S. (DPI)

Peter Smerdon (WFP)

Dawn Minott (RDT)

Table #2

Raabya Amijad (Pak)

Nora Kushti (Alb)

Peter Reeh (Moz)

Nguyen Thi Ngoc Van (Viet)

Esteban Zunin (Uru)

Frederik Matthys (RW)

Nora Godwin (UNICEF)

Corinne Perthuis (ILO)


Session ii sharing experiences and best practices

SESSION II: SHARING EXPERIENCES AND BEST PRACTICES

  • Rubric:

    • Discuss best practices for coordinating communication – share examples from some pilots, input from resource people

    • Break into groups and identify a new spokesperson for each table

      • Each table to discuss themes and best practices, building on all the discussion to date

      • Discuss what elements are local vs all pilots vs global

      • Discuss identified support needs, to be noted for discussion

      • Come up with creative new ideas to add (?!)

      • Propose some concrete steps for 2007 and beyond

    • Spokesperson raises key issues for table, followed by discussion

      • Discuss best practices for coordinating communications at country level and more broadly

      • Understand what it would take to achieve end-state vision identified earlier

Discussions and flip-chart output on all of the topics (here and previous) will be summarized for discussion tomorrow morning


Stop yawning and go play outside

STOP YAWNING, AND GO PLAY OUTSIDE...

See you at 7:30pm for drinks / dinner!


Communication for change un retreat day 2

“COMMUNICATION FOR CHANGE”UN RETREATDAY 2

Kievitz Kroon Country Estate

4 May 2007


Day two seating plan

DAY TWO SEATING PLAN

Table #1

Table #3

Eshila Maravanyika (Tanz)

Frederik Matthys (RW)

Cyriaque Ngoboka (RW)

Nguyen Thi Ngoc Van (Viet)

Luis Zaqueu (Moz)

Esteban Zunin (Uru)

Ashik Ganapathy (RDT)

Cassandra Waldon (UNDP)

Corinne Perthuis (ILO)

Michael Coleman (Viet)

Tahiro Gouro (CV)

Zarak Saleem Jan (Pak)

Nora Kushti (Alb)

Peter Reeh (Moz)

Theresa Smout (Tanz)

Manoel de A. e S. (DPI)

Nick Parsons (FAO)

Table #2

Raabya Amijad (Pak)

Sari Bjornholm (CV)

Thierry Delvigne-Jean (Moz)

Caroline Den Dulk (Viet)

Eldisa Lloshi (Alb)

Silvia da Rin Pagnetto (Uru)

Nora Godwin (UNICEF)

Peter Smerdon (WFP)

Dawn Minott (RDT)


Introduction recap of objectives

INTRODUCTION & RECAP OF OBJECTIVES

  • Introductory remarks

  • Three objectives:

    • To develop a shared understanding of communication challenges and opportunities associated with ‘One UN’ implementation

      • Including best practices sharing

    • To assist pilot countries in strategic communications planning

      • Identification of audiences, messages and channels for effective external and internal communication on the “One UN” pilots

    • To strengthen participants’ ability to use communication as an effective tool for implementing UN reform

      • Hands-on training component


Recap yesterday

RECAP: YESTERDAY...

18:00

Concrete steps and activities in 2007 (and beyond)

5

4

Sharing communication experiences

Coffee

Break

~4:15

3

Strategic communication tools

Lunch

~13:15

2

Approaching change from communication perspective

Coffee

Break

~11:30

1

Opening discussion on opportunities and challenges

Ensure agreement on objectives

0

8:45


Plan for today tomorrow

PLAN FOR TODAY & TOMORROW

5

Focal point networking session

~16:30

4

Wrap-up, support needs, next steps

Role-plays, refinement of comm plans

3

Lunch

~13:15

2

Working groups: developing comm plans

Coffee

Break

1

Internal & external stakeholders and views

Today

Tomorrow

Introduction, review of objectives & format

Hands-on communication training

0

8:30


Remember changing twice or even just once will result in an emotional journey

REMEMBER: ‘CHANGING TWICE’ (OR EVEN JUST ONCE) WILL RESULT IN AN EMOTIONAL JOURNEY

Note:This curve reflects the 'classic' situation if change is well managed. In other situations the curve may evolve dramatically differently

Source: The Change Monster, by Jeanie Duck (Used with permission)


Communication for change un retreat day 1

EACH EMOTIONAL PHASE OF CHANGE EXHIBITS

PREDICTABLE TRAPS AND UNIQUE MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Phase

Traps

Management Challenges

Phase One: Stagnation

Phase Two: Preparation

Phase Three: Implementation

Phase Four: Determination

Phase Five: Fruition

  • Organization assumes it’s safe

  • Feels no serious threat or compelling opportunity

  • Knows change is needed but is unsure what to do

  • Lacks confidence in self and management

  • Rush to the answer and jump into action

  • Fail to clarify scope, constituencies, robust plan

  • Fail to balance broad vision with detailed plan

  • Fail to appreciate the complexity of communications

  • Core group gets too far ahead

  • Assume readiness and understanding

  • Early wins generate unrealistic expectations

  • Take easy actions, leave long, hard ones unaddressed

  • Results slower than expected

  • Enthusiasm wanes; burnout occurs

  • Gloom and doom scenarios and blaming proliferate

  • Don’t celebrate or share rewards/recognition

  • Fail to reflect and harvest lessons learned

  • Allow accomplishments to become sacred cows

  • Allow Fruition to fade into Stagnation

  • Create a healthy dissatisfaction with the status quo

  • Generate appetite for change

  • Build required capabilities

    • skills, beliefs, behaviors

  • Unite the leaders; prepare to be tested

  • Develop credible action plan

    • strategy, plan to generate energy, enthusiasm

    • robust communications plan

  • Manage expectations and experience

  • Address beliefs and behaviors directly; reinforce what’s desired

  • Keep focus and clear accountability

  • Validate the vision

  • Stay in touch and stay flexible

  • Leaders drive action, make any necessary trade-offs

  • Address morale issues to increase motivation

  • Broadly share praise and rewards

  • Leverage learning to build change capability

  • Prepare for next cycle

  • Recruit new blood and new perspectives

Do we really have to change?

Will this plan work?

What’s in it for me?

Will mgmt makethe hard decisions?

Can we stay here?

Source: The Change Monster, by Jeanie Duck (Used with permission)


Key discussion topics from yesterday

KEY DISCUSSION TOPICS FROM YESTERDAY

  • Local issues vs pan-pilot issues vs global issues

    • What can we do ourselves? On what issues do we need guidance?

  • Role and structure of communication mechanisms

    • UNCG / regional bodies / global bodies

  • Inclusivity vs focus

    • Relates to ‘One Programme’, NRAs, but also joint communication

    • “Consensus slows us down, but without it we get flak”

  • Communicating the results vs communicating the process

    • Depends on the desired outcome, audience, medium, etc

  • Ensuring “senior” ownership

  • How to best use limited resources

    • How can we effectively prioritize (while lobbying for increased budget)?


Key communication challenges and opportunities identified are intertwined

KEY COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES IDENTIFIED ARE INTERTWINED

Challenges

Opportunities

  • Multiple brands and voices need to be coordinated

  • Avoid “one size fits all”

  • Involving the government, donors, staff

  • Finding right Incentives for collaboration, as all agencies want/need to see themselves in the product

  • Using UNCG can be unwieldy in some countries

  • Communication of results / impact, rather than process of change

  • Using the brand diversity as a positive thing, leveraging agency expertise in various ways (to also avoid new structures)

  • Share best practices commonly

  • Bring people together early through communication

  • Opportunity to expand / think outside the box

  • Make UNCGs effective, use for increasingly more and more

  • Take the chance to address perceptions of UN as inefficient, or extension of government; make value clear


Other major communication related themes identified

OTHER MAJOR COMMUNICATION-RELATED THEMES IDENTIFIED

Themes identified

Lessons learned and other ideas

  • Implementation can be slowed by uncertainties about how different HQ players view reform

  • Job security (UN staff)

  • Little clarity to date on pilot evaluation criteria

  • Frustrations at perceived (and sometimes real) exclusion can magnify otherwise small issues

  • Messaging from different sources can appear inconsistent or uncoordinated (region, HQ, DGO, etc...)

  • Details matter – “little things” can affect perception in big ways

  • Need for open and unambiguous top-down support for the ‘One UN’ reform agenda

  • Ensure clear vision for end result, which maintains needed visibility

  • Improve transparency and trust by frequent contact (even when the answer isn’t yet known)

  • Identify and reach out to key opinion leaders

  • Full transparency about the process and status of discussions

  • Ensure consistent messages (Regions, UNCT, HQ)

  • Necessity for constant and early communication

    • With all agencies incl. non-resident

  • Pilots should drive their own messages, and other UN stakeholders should follow this lead (?)

  • Central messages re: ‘One UN’ should be agreed by inter-agency working groups (?)

  • Be aware of common perception of RCO = UNDP = (at least until firewall instituted...probably after too)

  • e.g. email domains being adjusted; should be UNDP if UNDP, UN if RC / RCO


Some specific ideas open questions and support needs

SOME SPECIFIC IDEAS, OPEN QUESTIONS AND SUPPORT NEEDS

  • Ideas for specific communication elements / best practices

    • Q&As with different stakeholders in mind – room for corporate support

    • Recorded RC interviews

    • Maximize face to face communications (e.g. townhalls)

    • UNCT websites – room for best practice sharing

    • Leverage agency / other pilot experiences regarding corporate identity / logo

    • joint press releases can be agonizing but confidence building and help with culture changes

  • Open Questions:

    • What is ideal structure for UNCG? Role of RCO? Role of DPI/UNIC? Who makes what decisions and what are accountabilities? What is done at country level and what at region/HQ? Need to understand roles / time breakdown, with clear ToR. Goal is to have sustainable structure, not just goodwill based. Can we build on global mechanisms for agencies to discuss communication?

  • Support needs

    • Use 8 for 1 more, sharing country-specific materials that could be leveraged

    • Possible training for UNCGs

    • DGO – develop and share understanding of views of donors

    • Need for consistent global response / strategy, and mechanism to endorse it


Session i views from internal and external stakeholder groups

SESSION I: VIEWS FROM INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDER GROUPS

  • Brief thoughts (to follow) on internal and external communications perspectives

  • Question guide for group:

    • Is it all clear – what needs clarification?

    • What does it mean – your observations on implications?

    • What are the similarities between concerns of internal and external stakeholders? What are the differences?


  • Internal stakeholders examples of major internal un concerns

    INTERNAL STAKEHOLDERSExamples of Major Internal UN Concerns

    • Fears for employment and agency identity

      • “Will I be viewed as a traitor by my agency if I participate?”

      • “Will my agency still be able to perform its mandated functions?”

      • “Does ‘One Office’ mean I will lose my job?”

      • “Are we cutting down on agencies?”

    • Uncertainty regarding support from the UN system

      • “What does my agency really think about this reform?”

      • “How do we solve key technical issues at country level?”

    • Anxiety over the effort involved in the reform

      • “How much is expected of me in this process?”

      • “How do we ensure that we don’t neglect our programmes during this process?”

    • Uncertainty regarding the rationale and process for ‘One UN’ reform

      • “Is this really going to work?”

      • “Can we still fundraise? Can we still do our own activities?”

      • “Why are we starting at country level, not HQ? We need guidance!”


    External stakeholders substantive issues to address in communications plans

    EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDERSSubstantive Issues to Address in Communications Plans

    Issues

    Governments

    Donors

    • Articulation of key benefits

    • Key concerns

    • Process clarity needed

    • Cost savings

    • Reduced transaction costs

    • Improved service to national needs (efficiency, efficacy, coordination)

    • Impact on national staff

    • Reinvestment of cost savings in programme budget

    • “Is this a donor-driven agenda with the ultimate goal of trimming UN operations?”

    • Extent of government ownership

    • Expected timeline, project mgmt responsibility

    • Holding UNCT accountable for delivering change

    • Extent of UNCT freedom to personalize ‘One UN’

    • Improved and strategic programme prioritization

    • Reduced transaction costs for donors and governments

    • Ability of reformed UN to absorb increasing aid flows

    • Extent of, and rules governing, pooled funding

    • Absolution from fears of ‘donor agenda’

    • “Are we once again wasting ODA on internal reform processes rather than development results?”

    • Relationship of ‘One UN’ to high-level panel

    • Extent of UNCT freedom to personalize ‘One UN’


    Coffee break1

    COFFEE BREAK


    Session ii developing communications plans

    SESSION II: DEVELOPING COMMUNICATIONS PLANS

    • Rubric:

      • 3 working groups (by table, but using rooms upstairs as needed):

        • Internal (focused on overall change issues – audiences could include regions / staff / etc)

        • External (focused on change issues for key government and donor stakeholders)

        • External (focused on change issues for key media, public, civil society stakeholders)

      • Develop elements for communications plan targeting either internal or external stakeholders and their concerns

      • Focus on key messages and themes, and segmentation of messages; touch upon media and frequencies as needed, responsibilities

      • Different countries already have communication plans to some degree; let’s build upon them using the combined expertise in the room

    When we reconvene together, we’ll put these plans to the test...


    Template for pilot communications strategies1

    TEMPLATE FOR PILOT COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES

    Comms

    plan

    Audience

    Perception

    Objective

    Key message

    Channel

    Owner / Spoke-people

    Action

    Timing / Location

    Supporting material

    Measure-ment

    Remarks

    Govern-ment

    Key opinion leaders (UNCT)

    All Pilot staff

    Donors


    Session iii testing the communications plans

    SESSION III: TESTING THE COMMUNICATIONS PLANS

    • Rubric:

      • Each group presents its plan

      • ‘Audience’ (other two groups) role-plays the target stakeholder groups (e.g. donors, government, etc), reacting and constructively critiquing the plan that has been presented

        • Are there any gaps?

        • Does anything not make sense?

        • Are any concerns left unattended?

        • What are implementation issues?

        • What are priorities – which elements are absolutely critical?

      • Open discussion on how to refine the plans, captured by rapporteurs


    Lunch1

    LUNCH


    Session iv discussion of support needs

    SESSION IV: DISCUSSION OF SUPPORT NEEDS

    • Rubric:

      • Presentation of the ‘parking lot’ of support needs

      • Presentation of DGO support offering

      • Discussion

        • Any additional needs / barriers to plan implementation?

        • Any that are no longer so important?

        • Which are the priority needs?

      • Wrap-up of communications planning & support needs discussions

        • Next steps


    What did we want to get out of this retreat from thursday morning

    WHAT DID WE WANT TO GET OUT OF THIS RETREAT?From Thursday Morning

    • Understand where we stand and where we are going

    • Lessons learned by other countries on communications

    • Meet / network with other focal points / pilot countries

    • Learn how other pilots are doing

    • Share ideas and listen to issues

    • Use experiences and best practices to overcome challenges

    • Learn more tools for communication

    • Understand the different roles required as part of “Delivering as One”

    • Understand perceptions of the UN in country

    • Therapeutic value of knowing we’re not alone

    • Clearer picture of where we’re heading

    • See how One UN can strengthen overall communication plans and principles

    • Learn what’s expected of us and how we can share vision

    • Develop an approach that can work widely

    • Understand clear next steps and follow up to this meeting

    • Speak frankly without politics about what works and what doesn’t

    • Deal with implementation as well as strategy

    • Understand what the support needs are, and from whom

    • Compete together, not against each other


    Closing questions

    CLOSING QUESTIONS

    • Looking back in ten years what will make you feel most proud? Least proud?

    • What are the greatest challenges that you believe the team will face in achieving your most proud outcome?

    Closing remarks


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