Evidence for a mixing transition in fully-developed pipe flow
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Evidence for a mixing transition in fully-developed pipe flow. Beverley McKeon, Jonathan Morrison DEPT AERONAUTICS IMPERIAL COLLEGE. Summary. Dimotakis’ “mixing transition” Mixing transition in wall-bounded flows Relationship to the inertial subrange

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Evidence for a mixing transition in fully-developed pipe flow

Beverley McKeon, Jonathan Morrison

DEPT AERONAUTICS

IMPERIAL COLLEGE


Summary
Summary flow

  • Dimotakis’ “mixing transition”

  • Mixing transition in wall-bounded flows

  • Relationship to the inertial subrange

  • Importance of the mixing transition to self-similarity

  • Insufficient separation of scales: the mesolayer


Dimotakis mixing transition j fluid mech 409 2000
Dimotakis’ mixing transition flowJ. Fluid Mech. 409 (2000)

  • Originally observed in free shear layers (e.g. Konrad, 1976)

  • “Ability of the flow to sustain three-dimensional fluctuations” in Konrad’s turbulent shear layer

  • Dimotakis details existence in jets, boundary layers, bluff-body flows, grid turbulence etc


Dimotakis mixing transition j fluid mech 409 20001
Dimotakis’ mixing transition flowJ. Fluid Mech. 409 (2000)

  • Universal phenomenon of turbulence/criterion for fully-developed turbulence

  • Decoupling of viscous and large-scale effects

  • Usually associated with inertial subrange

  • Transition: Red* ~ 104 or Rl ~ 100 – 140


Variation of wake factor with re q
Variation of wake factor with Re flowq

From Coles (1962)


Pipe equivalent variation of x
Pipe equivalent: variation of flowx

  • For boundary layers wake factor from

  • In pipe related to wake factor

  • Note that x is ratio of ZS to traditional outer velocity scales



Identification with mixing transition
Identification with mixing transition flow

  • Transition for Rl ~ 100 – 140, or Red* ~ 104

  • ReR* = 104 when ReD ~ 75 x 103 (Rl = 110 when y+ = 100, approximately)

  • This is ReD where begins to decrease with Reynolds number

  • Rl varies across pipe – start of mixing transition when Rl = 100

  • Coincides with the appearance of a “first-order” subrange (Lumley `64, Bradshaw `67, Lawn `71)


Extension to inertial subrange
Extension to inertial subrange? flow

  • Mixing transition corresponds to decoupling of viscous and y scales - necessary for self-similarity

  • Suggests examination of spectra, particularly close to dissipative range

  • Inertial subrange: local region in wavenumber space where production=dissipation i.e. inertial transfer only

  • “First order” inertial subrange (Bradshaw 1967): sources,sinks << inertial transfer


Scaling of the inertial subrange
Scaling of the inertial subrange flow

For

K41 overlap

In overlap region, dissipation


Inertial subrange re d 75 x 10 3
Inertial subrange – Re flowD = 75 x 103

y+ = 100 - 200 i.e. traditionally accepted log law region



Similarity of the streamwise fluctuation spectrum i
Similarity of the streamwise fluctuation spectrum I flow

Perry and Li, J. Fluid Mech. (1990). Fig. 1b



Outer velocity scale for the pipe data flow

y/R

ReD < 100 x 103

ZS outer scale gives better collapse in core region for all Reynolds numbers

100 x 103 < ReD < 200 x 103

ReD > 200 x 103


Self similarity of mean velocity profile requires x const

Addition of inner and outer log laws shows that U flowCL+ scales logarithmically in R+

Integration of log law from wall to centerline shows that U+ also scales logarithmically in R+

Thus for log law to hold, the difference between them, x, must be a constant

True for ReD > 300 x 103

Self-similarity of mean velocity profile requires x = const.


Inner mean velocity scaling
Inner mean velocity scaling flow

B

A

C

k = 0.421

Power law

y

k = 0.385?

y = U+ - 1/k ln y+

y+


Relationship with mesolayer
Relationship with “mesolayer” flow

  • e.g. Long & Chen (1981), Sreenivasan (1997), Wosnik, Castillo & George (2000), Klewicki et al

  • Region where separation of scales is too small for inertially-dominated turbulence OR region where streamwise momentum equation reduces to balance of pressure and viscous forces

  • Observed below mixing transition

  • Included in generalized log law formulation (Buschmann and Gad-el-Hak); second order and higher matching terms are tiny for y+ > 1000


Summary1
Summary flow

  • Evidence for start of mixing transition in pipe flow at ReD = 75 x 103. (Not previously demonstrated)

  • Correspondence of mixing transition with emergence of the “first-order” inertial subrange, end of mesolayer

  • Importance of constant x for similarity of mean velocity profile (Reynolds similarity)

  • Difference between ReD for mixing transition and complete similarity


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