CAWSES Space Weather Theme  IHY, eGY, IPY 2007:  Working Together

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CAWSES Space Weather Theme IHY, eGY, IPY 2007: Working Together

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1. Janet Kozyra, University of Michigan Co-Chair, Space Weather Theme, CAWSES Presented by Jan Sojka, Utah State University Co-Chair, Climatology of the Sun-Earth System Theme, CAWSES IHY North American Planning Meeting Boulder, Colorado, 16-18 Feb 2005 CAWSES Space Weather Theme & IHY, eGY, IPY 2007: Working Together

2. Some Background on CAWSES

3. SCOSTEP President: M. A. Geller Vice-president: S. T. Wu Scientific Secretary: J. H. Allen S. K. Avery (URSI) W. Baumjohann (IAGA) R. Fujii (COSPAR) B. Schmieder (IAU) F. W. Sluijter (IUPAP) T. Tsuda (IAMAS) M. Candidi (SCAR)

4. CAWSES Scientific Steering Group Chair: Sunanda Basu, BU, USA Jean-Louis Bougeret, CNRS, France Joanna Haigh, Imperial College, UK Yohsuke Kamide, STEL, Japan Arthur Richmond, NCAR, USA C.-H. Liu, NCU, Taiwan Lev Zelenyi, IKI, Russia D. Pallamraju, Scientific Coordinator L. Walsh, Program Admin.

5. Four Themes under CAWSES I am only addressing the space weather theme. I can’t speak for the other theme chairs. But many of the CAWSES themes have common elements that would lend themselves to useful collaborations to enhance both CAWSES and the IHY campaigns. I am only addressing the space weather theme. I can’t speak for the other theme chairs. But many of the CAWSES themes have common elements that would lend themselves to useful collaborations to enhance both CAWSES and the IHY campaigns.

6. The CAWSES space weather theme is structured to focus on the coupling and feedbacks that create global sun-to-Earth system behavior. This systems view is critical to enhance understanding and the range of useful space weather prediction.The CAWSES space weather theme is structured to focus on the coupling and feedbacks that create global sun-to-Earth system behavior. This systems view is critical to enhance understanding and the range of useful space weather prediction.

8. Goal: Collaborative analysis of international sun-to-Earth data sets aimed at answering open questions in space weather understanding & prediction Main Strategy: Sun-to-Earth campaigns (pre-planned, real-time based on delta sunspot or retrospective) driven by science questions New Feature: Progressive development of new global data analysis tools that require international collaboration worldwide maps of geophysical quantities (ex: ULF wave power, hmF2, nmF2, high-resolution GPS TEC, etc.) continuous time-series of solar observations (ex: continuous H alpha solar images) Use of new global data analysis tools in combination with other satellite & ground-based data in campaigns to address science questions in ways that were not possible before. Capacity Building: Data sharing as a powerful capacity building exercise in developing nations. Puts local observations into the global view.

9. Created by a working group, consisting of representatives from observing sites, who decide on: the best parameters to display the needed algorithms to integrate the data from different sites (possibly on the fly) the most useful graphical displays Efficient data access The recruitment of observing sites in critical locations Where possible, use recruitment of sites as a capacity building tool Suggest space weather campaigns or retrospective analysis efforts that utilize the global science analysis tools (& other data) to address cutting edge science questions

10. Progressively develop a set of new international data analysis tools Valuable asset for space research Combined with satellite data they give new ways of investigating important science questions Lasting legacy after IGY celebrations Collect & preserve comprehensive sets of international sun-to-Earth observations Valuable for developing assimilative space weather models Important for testing understanding and predictive capabilities of sun-to-Earth models Worldwide resource for sun-Earth system science during and after IGY Build up an international community familiar with campaign tools & collaborative analysis ready to participate in the IGY Help refine science questions and needs for worldwide campaigns over the next 2 years in preparation for the IGY celebration.

11. Critical Joint Needs with IHY, eGY, IPY: Data Environment Baseline Need: Seamless access sun-to-earth data sets worldwide (including developing nations) -- through Virtual Observatories? Wish List: High level, analyzed and intepretted data by instrument teams On-the-fly generation of integrated data products (world-maps, continuous time series) constructed by networks of worldwide observatories Summary data on a common time or spatial axis at vantage points throughout the geospace system Mapping between regions Tracking of science questions that develop Smart data searches (looking for similar features, similar events, statistics in Virtual Observatories) Model simulations as data sets viewed along satellite trajectories mapped to ground-based sites Plotted with observations in common format post-processed quantities (i.e., Poynting flux, B field energy, etc.) Support for assimilative models Secure proprietary data sharing for space weather user community

12. Update on Data Sets and new CAWSES Global Analysis Tools for the First CAWSES Campaign

13. Give a short view of the observations collected and the first attempts at new or enhanced global data analysis tools. Give a short view of the observations collected and the first attempts at new or enhanced global data analysis tools.

14. Collaboration with: ISR World Days, MI-coupling campaign, 29 March - 3 April 2004 Focus: Coupling between the high- and low-latitude ionospheres Coordinated observations by incoherent scatter radars worldwide Sonderstrom, EISCAT, Svalbard, Millstone Hill, Arecibo, Jicamarca, Irkutsk (Russia), and Kharkov (Ukraine) Led by: Chao-Song Huang (MIT/Haystack) CPEA (Coupling Processes in the Equatorial Atmosphere) March - April 2004 Focus: Coupling troposphere up through thermosphere in a strong convective region over Indonesia Led by: Prof. Shoichiro Fukao, Dr. Mamoru Yamamoto (Kyoto Univ)

15. Satellite Data Solar: SOHO, RHESSI Solar Wind: ACE, SMEI Magnetosphere: Cluster, Double Star, Polar, GOES, NOAA/POES, Iridium, LANL GEO, IMAGE Radiation Belt: SAMPEX, GOES particles, HEO, LANL SOPA, GPS Ionosphere: DMSP, FAST, ROCSAT, TIMED Thermosphere/Mesosphere/Stratosphere: TIMED, UARS, CHAMP Solar Ground-Based & Satellite Observations Catalog hosted at the CDAW website (http://cdaw.gsfc.nasa.gov) Data Sources: IPS, ISOON, H-alpha, TRACE, SOHO, Metric Radio, Microwave,etc. Campaign Data Sets Purpose of these data set slides is just to give an idea of the variety and amount of data provided by participants in the campaign. The challenge now lies in making use of this data within a worldwide analysis campaign. Plans for this are in progress. Our ability to provide this data to participant in useable formats, supply needed common analysis tools, and facilitate a virtual worldwide collaborative analysis effort will determine the success of the campaign. Purpose of these data set slides is just to give an idea of the variety and amount of data provided by participants in the campaign. The challenge now lies in making use of this data within a worldwide analysis campaign. Plans for this are in progress. Our ability to provide this data to participant in useable formats, supply needed common analysis tools, and facilitate a virtual worldwide collaborative analysis effort will determine the success of the campaign.

16. Ground-Based Data Fabry Perot Interferometers Northern Scandinavia at Kiruna, Sweden; Sodankyla, Finland and Longyearbyen, Svalbard Emissions OI (557.7 nm), OI (630.0 nm) at Bear lake Observatory, UT OI (630 nm) High Resolution Imaging Echelle Spectrograph at Boston Optical photometer - Trivandrum Ionosondes & Digisondes International digisonde users group in Center for Atmospheric Research, Lowell's DIDBase Australian Ionosonde Network -- 5 min cadence 3 digital ionosondes in Brazil Vertical ionospheric sounding in Rome Oblique ionospheric sounding between Rome and London Ionospheric Irregularities Scintillations derived from chain of GPS receivers located in the American 70o longitude sector and SCINDA global network of AFRL VHF spaced-receiver and GPS instruments (Tirunelveli, India) Campaign Data Sets

17. Campaign Data Sets Radars Incoherent Scatter Radars Sonderstrom, EISCAT, Svalbard, Millstone Hill, Arecibo, Jicamarca, Irkutsk (Russia), and Kharkov (Ukraine) SuperDARN Magnetometer Data Global ULF wave maps (power, wave index, magnetospheric density) Initial set of magnetometer arrays: IMAGE, MACCS, CANOPUS, USGS, MEASURE, SAMBA, 210 MM Progressively extend to include other arrays, other magnetometer data products ULF wave measurements in Bulgaria, Italy and Antartica Digital magnetometer, Kodaikanal, India SEGMA array in Italy Kharkiv V. Karazin National University magnetometer Trivandrum magnetometer TEC IGS Rinex data, World & European maps JPL Maps Chain of GPS receivers located in the American 70o long sector

18. Mesosphere Observations MF radar: Neutral winds 80-98 km, equatorial station at Tirunelveli, India Kharkiv V. Karazin National University Network of 35 MF radars spanning high to low latitude (Scott Palo) MST radar at Gadanki, India E-region drifts at 85-105 km at Collm (52N, 15E). All-sky, multi-wavelength gravity wave imager, located at Bear Lake Observatory,UT Medium field (75 deg) Mesospheric Temperature Mapper  located at Maui, Hawaii (20.8 N, 156 W) Raleigh Lidar in Gadanki, India Lower atmosphere radar in Gadanki, India GPS receiver in Gadanki, India All Sky Imagers 3 in Brazil Equatorial Electrojet Tirunelveli, India HF Doppler Radar Kodaikanal, India, Kharkiv V. Karazin National University, & Trivandrum Campaign Data Sets

19. Simulation Outputs as Data Sets GAIM - Assimilative model of the Ionosphere - Jan Sojka CSEM MHD Simulation - ULF waves - John Freeman TIEGCM - Geoff Crowley Campaign Data Sets

20. CAWSES World Maps - New International Research Tools First Results: CAWSES Hi-Res GPS TEC World Maps [Leads: Anthea Coster (USA) & M. Hernandez Pajares (Spain) CAWSES/GAIM Assimilative Worldwide Maps of the Ionosphere [Lead: Jan Sojka, Utah State University] CAWSES/IAGA/GEM Worldwide ULF Wave Parameters [Leads: Ian Mann, Paul Loto’aniu, University of Alberta, CA]

21. CAWSES Hi-Res Worldwide TEC The most obvious thing about this worlwide TEC map are all of the data gaps over oceans and certain continents. The long data trails across the oceans come from the Topex satellite altimeter (TEC up to 1400 km). From the beginning of the movie to March 31, the ionosphere is disturbed by recurrent substorm activity associated with a high speed stream. April 1 and 2 are extremely quiet days showing an undisturbed ionosphere. April 3-4 and April 5-6 are both moderate magnetic storms (Dst min approximately -100 nT). On April 3 you can see a very distinctive storm enhanced density (SED) plume move up over North America and into the high latitude reigon.The most obvious thing about this worlwide TEC map are all of the data gaps over oceans and certain continents. The long data trails across the oceans come from the Topex satellite altimeter (TEC up to 1400 km). From the beginning of the movie to March 31, the ionosphere is disturbed by recurrent substorm activity associated with a high speed stream. April 1 and 2 are extremely quiet days showing an undisturbed ionosphere. April 3-4 and April 5-6 are both moderate magnetic storms (Dst min approximately -100 nT). On April 3 you can see a very distinctive storm enhanced density (SED) plume move up over North America and into the high latitude reigon.

22. Global View of the Ionosphere Through Assimilative Modeling From Jan Sojka: LH plot bottom panel: This is what you get globally (almost globally if you use a physics or empirical model) in this case the Ionospheric Forecast Model. This is for 25 March 2004, one of the early CAWSES campaign days. You are looking at the peak F-region density on a linear scale at 0900 UT.  The one-world view is dominated by the equatorial/Appelton anomalies. Compare this to the GAIM assimilative model in the top panel. RH plot:  The bottom panel is climatology again (IFM). This plot is for Day 92 at a later UT.  The UT is such that South America is in sunlight,i.e., has the anomalies.  The upper panel is what USU GAIM reproduces using more than 160 GPS ground-based receivers.  Sort of similar, but there are differences that are significant, as you will see later. From Jan Sojka: LH plot bottom panel: This is what you get globally (almost globally if you use a physics or empirical model) in this case the Ionospheric Forecast Model. This is for 25 March 2004, one of the early CAWSES campaign days. You are looking at the peak F-region density on a linear scale at 0900 UT.  The one-world view is dominated by the equatorial/Appelton anomalies. Compare this to the GAIM assimilative model in the top panel. RH plot:  The bottom panel is climatology again (IFM). This plot is for Day 92 at a later UT.  The UT is such that South America is in sunlight,i.e., has the anomalies.  The upper panel is what USU GAIM reproduces using more than 160 GPS ground-based receivers.  Sort of similar, but there are differences that are significant, as you will see later.

23. Global View of the Ionosphere Through Assimilative Modeling From Jan Sojka: LH plot:  Same format as previous slide for Day 93 RH plot:  Same format as previous slide for Day 94 Comparing these days shows IFM is the same, but GAIM changes especially in the northern anomaly (although we have more GPS data from the northern region at this time which may explain the greater weather GAIM shows in the north).  Hence, the real world (as reflected in GAIM, especially north) shows extensive day-to-day variability. From Jan Sojka: LH plot:  Same format as previous slide for Day 93 RH plot:  Same format as previous slide for Day 94 Comparing these days shows IFM is the same, but GAIM changes especially in the northern anomaly (although we have more GPS data from the northern region at this time which may explain the greater weather GAIM shows in the north).  Hence, the real world (as reflected in GAIM, especially north) shows extensive day-to-day variability.

24. CAWSES/GAIM Assimilative Ionosphere Model. Fills in sparse data coverage with physical model From Jan Sojka: Above is a summary throughout the CAWSES interval focusing on the region over Jicamarca to show how important the differences are between the assimilative model and a forecast model of the ionosphere. The bottom row of panels are data extracted each from GAIM,but only between 1300 and 1500 local time at Jicamarca, Peru.   Now you can see north and south anomaly day-to-day variability. GAIM in this case uses TEC data (Total Electron Content) to reconstruct the ionosphere from 90 km to over 2000 km, globally.  All the plots show the F-layer peak density. Hence local high resolution is possible if enough GPS receivers are located there and global maps are also generated. From Jan Sojka: Above is a summary throughout the CAWSES interval focusing on the region over Jicamarca to show how important the differences are between the assimilative model and a forecast model of the ionosphere. The bottom row of panels are data extracted each from GAIM,but only between 1300 and 1500 local time at Jicamarca, Peru.   Now you can see north and south anomaly day-to-day variability. GAIM in this case uses TEC data (Total Electron Content) to reconstruct the ionosphere from 90 km to over 2000 km, globally.  All the plots show the F-layer peak density. Hence local high resolution is possible if enough GPS receivers are located there and global maps are also generated.

25. CAWSES/IAGA/GEM World Magnetometer Maps Chair: Ian Mann, Canada (CANOPUS) Members: Ari Viljanen (IMAGE), Mark Engebretson (MACCS), Jeff Love (USGS), Mark Moldwin (MEASURE), Eftyhia Zesta (SAMBA), Kiyohumi Yumoto (210 MM ). First data product: ULF wave power distribution maps Plans: Extend to include other arrays and stations Extend to create other magnetometer data products based on the time-series data. new ULF wave indices ULF magnetospheric density maps Data Host: Space Sciences Data Portal (SSDP), University of Alberta (PI:Robert Rankin)

26. From Paul Loto’aniu: The LH plot is for the Oct/Nov 2003 halloween storm interval while the RH plot is the CAWSES interval (Mar 26 - Apr 17). The figures in both files follow the same format. The top plot in each figure is Dst, next is an example X/H component amplitude time series plot from one mag station, next is the dynamic PSD of that example mag station time series data, and the bottom plot in each file is the total ULF (2 - 10 mHz) wave power X/H component taken from a number of latitudinually spaced mag stations in the European sector (IMAGE/SAMNET) array. The bottom plot was generated using 13 stations in LH plot and 8 stations in RH plot. The map shows the station locations for CANOPUS, IMAGE and SAMNET. In the LH plot you can see that there are very large ULF waves on the 29 and 31 Oct. The dark red lines running down the figure are to show where the wave power is due to ULF waves and were it is primarilt due to the strong Dst's. Although we only show total power above 2 mHz there is still residual power due to the Dst. So care must be taken when interpreting the bottom plot. Before oct 29 there is no ULF waves below L ~ 4. After the Dst recovery on 29 Oct we see that large amplitude ULF waves penetrate down to at least L~3.0. This deep penetration also correlates with when SAMPEX (not show here) observed enhancements in the relativistic electron fluxes in the slot region (L = 2-3). The ULF wave power on the 29 and 31 oct occur across all L values. As for the CAWSES interval (RH plot) there is very little ULF wave power below L=6. The power that is observed is likely due to the multiple dips in field strenght. Obviously lots of storms/substorms during this period. It is possible to get a better idea of the ULF waves if you focused in on a small time interval. The FFT lenght used was 5000 points (~ 1.4 hours). I sent about 22 days of data but if you were to look at the amplitude time series over a one or two hour period, I suspect that you would see the ULF waves. The other thing was that the ampltiude time series plots are heavily downsided (rebinned) because the volume of data for 1 sec over that many days would have made the file sizes too big. As a result visually the amplitude time series plots only show 40 sec data.From Paul Loto’aniu: The LH plot is for the Oct/Nov 2003 halloween storm interval while the RH plot is the CAWSES interval (Mar 26 - Apr 17). The figures in both files follow the same format. The top plot in each figure is Dst, next is an example X/H component amplitude time series plot from one mag station, next is the dynamic PSD of that example mag station time series data, and the bottom plot in each file is the total ULF (2 - 10 mHz) wave power X/H component taken from a number of latitudinually spaced mag stations in the European sector (IMAGE/SAMNET) array. The bottom plot was generated using 13 stations in LH plot and 8 stations in RH plot. The map shows the station locations for CANOPUS, IMAGE and SAMNET. In the LH plot you can see that there are very large ULF waves on the 29 and 31 Oct. The dark red lines running down the figure are to show where the wave power is due to ULF waves and were it is primarilt due to the strong Dst's. Although we only show total power above 2 mHz there is still residual power due to the Dst. So care must be taken when interpreting the bottom plot. Before oct 29 there is no ULF waves below L ~ 4. After the Dst recovery on 29 Oct we see that large amplitude ULF waves penetrate down to at least L~3.0. This deep penetration also correlates with when SAMPEX (not show here) observed enhancements in the relativistic electron fluxes in the slot region (L = 2-3). The ULF wave power on the 29 and 31 oct occur across all L values. As for the CAWSES interval (RH plot) there is very little ULF wave power below L=6. The power that is observed is likely due to the multiple dips in field strenght. Obviously lots of storms/substorms during this period. It is possible to get a better idea of the ULF waves if you focused in on a small time interval. The FFT lenght used was 5000 points (~ 1.4 hours). I sent about 22 days of data but if you were to look at the amplitude time series over a one or two hour period, I suspect that you would see the ULF waves. The other thing was that the ampltiude time series plots are heavily downsided (rebinned) because the volume of data for 1 sec over that many days would have made the file sizes too big. As a result visually the amplitude time series plots only show 40 sec data.

27. From Paul Loto’aniu: If you use your hand to cover the region from 2 mHz down, you will notice that above 2 mHz there is still some power that appears at the time of the |Dst| maximum. To the FFT the Dst looks like a very low frequency ( < 1 mHz) wave cycle. However, there is spectral leakage into the higher frequency bands and if the power of this very low frequency signal is unusually large (as is the case in the LH figure on the previous slide) the power leaking into the higher frequencies is also unusually large. Also, if the drop in the background field is very sudden or sharp the linear detrend and high pass filter can mistaken this for a real high frequency signal. The bottom plot in the above figure is the top plot high pass filtered with a 2 mHz cutoff. If you were to only use the filtered time series you could mistake the large amplitude wiggles just after 0600 UT as due to real waves when in fact if you compare it to top plot its just due to the large drop in the field strength (i.e. ring current dynamics). If the Dst in very large there is no real way around this problem. You could subtract the data from a magnetic field model. Unfortunately, in very active times, as is the case in the figures, the field models are not reliable and they in fact may introduce other unwanted signals. It is therefore better to filter out what you can, which is why the total power shown is from 2 - 10 mHz and not 1 - 10 mHz, and have an example unfiltered time series plot above the psd so as to help explain the results. Thats why I have included unfiltered amplitude time series plot from an example station. From Paul Loto’aniu: If you use your hand to cover the region from 2 mHz down, you will notice that above 2 mHz there is still some power that appears at the time of the |Dst| maximum. To the FFT the Dst looks like a very low frequency ( < 1 mHz) wave cycle. However, there is spectral leakage into the higher frequency bands and if the power of this very low frequency signal is unusually large (as is the case in the LH figure on the previous slide) the power leaking into the higher frequencies is also unusually large. Also, if the drop in the background field is very sudden or sharp the linear detrend and high pass filter can mistaken this for a real high frequency signal. The bottom plot in the above figure is the top plot high pass filtered with a 2 mHz cutoff. If you were to only use the filtered time series you could mistake the large amplitude wiggles just after 0600 UT as due to real waves when in fact if you compare it to top plot its just due to the large drop in the field strength (i.e. ring current dynamics). If the Dst in very large there is no real way around this problem. You could subtract the data from a magnetic field model. Unfortunately, in very active times, as is the case in the figures, the field models are not reliable and they in fact may introduce other unwanted signals. It is therefore better to filter out what you can, which is why the total power shown is from 2 - 10 mHz and not 1 - 10 mHz, and have an example unfiltered time series plot above the psd so as to help explain the results. Thats why I have included unfiltered amplitude time series plot from an example station.

28. From Paul Loto’aniu: Except for the Dst all the plots were created using a ground data handling (GDH) software package currently under development, using IDL, as our contribution to CAWSES. A picture of the graphical user interface of the software is shown here. The GDH software will act as a black box to the user. That is, the user will not care about how it works or care about the magnetometer data format. He/she just presses buttons and out come the plots, etc.  Currently we have IMAGE/SAMNET and CANOPUS data file formats coded. However, we are hoping to incorporate as many magnetometer arraysas possible. The basic user procedure to display data using the software is as follows: The user downloads the data from the canopus, image/samnet array websites. Opens IDL and runs the GDH software. Selects station(s) using mouse (you can see list of stations on left hand side of figure). Select start date and number of days (bottom left hand side of figure). Press get data button (bottom right hand side of figure). X/H, Y/D and Z/Z components are displayed in the display section of the interface. The user never needs to look at the data files. If there is a day and/or station for which there is no data file a warning dialog window opens when the user press "get data" telling the user that the file does not exist. The important thing is that we are working on a ULF wave ground data handling software package that will allow the ULF community to bring together magnetometer data from different arrays giving a more global picture of the ULF wave power in the magnetosphere, without the worry of different data formats or sampling rates. The ultimate plan is to create a database were all data is stored. The GDH software links to the database over the internet. From Paul Loto’aniu: Except for the Dst all the plots were created using a ground data handling (GDH) software package currently under development, using IDL, as our contribution to CAWSES. A picture of the graphical user interface of the software is shown here. The GDH software will act as a black box to the user. That is, the user will not care about how it works or care about the magnetometer data format. He/she just presses buttons and out come the plots, etc.  Currently we have IMAGE/SAMNET and CANOPUS data file formats coded. However, we are hoping to incorporate as many magnetometer arraysas possible. The basic user procedure to display data using the software is as follows: The user downloads the data from the canopus, image/samnet array websites. Opens IDL and runs the GDH software. Selects station(s) using mouse (you can see list of stations on left hand side of figure). Select start date and number of days (bottom left hand side of figure). Press get data button (bottom right hand side of figure). X/H, Y/D and Z/Z components are displayed in the display section of the interface. The user never needs to look at the data files. If there is a day and/or station for which there is no data file a warning dialog window opens when the user press "get data" telling the user that the file does not exist. The important thing is that we are working on a ULF wave ground data handling software package that will allow the ULF community to bring together magnetometer data from different arrays giving a more global picture of the ULF wave power in the magnetosphere, without the worry of different data formats or sampling rates. The ultimate plan is to create a database were all data is stored. The GDH software links to the database over the internet.

29. Future Plans – to come! Two virtual worldwide poster sessions in planning for the analysis of the 1st CAWSES campaign Data exchange Science issues raised by the data 30 day campaign in September 2005 All 8 worldwide ISR radars will operate on best effort basis Investigate global ionospheric variability Special focus on modeling of this variability Extend observations sun-to-Earth to look at solar drivers and geospace responses Collaborate, if possible, with CPEA again

30. Joint development of data environment & worldwide campaign analysis tools Collaborative effort to collect and archive comprehensive sun-to-Earth data sets during IHY. NSF contribution: Request to run all ISR radars opportunistically during magnetic activity throughout 2007 International Space Agency contributions: Request to make available relevant satellite data during as many magnetically active periods as possible in 2007 CAWSES, ICESTAR, CEDAR and other programs: Recruit & coordinate worldwide ground-based contributions CAWSES: Make available the set of new global ground-based analysis tools during magnetically active periods IHY/CAWSES: Recruit large-scale model outputs & assimilative models as part of the archived data sets

31. Comprehensive sun-to-Earth data sets would be an important worldwide resource and lasting legacy, freely available during and after the IHY for research efforts aimed at: Focused science question within the global context Sun-to-earth system science research issues Design of new space missions Identifying important gaps in ground-based arrays Testing of design concepts for ground-based instrument arrays Assimilative space weather modeling efforts Verification of sun-to-Earth and large-scale space weather models Testing of predictive capabilities of space weather models

32. Extra Slides

33. Extra Slides

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