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Pastoral Care Protocol for Victims of Sexual Assault. By Chaplains David Scheider, Ronald Thomas, Peter Frederich, and Tom Waynick. Introduction. By following this simple protocol, you will be able to offer effective pastoral care and counseling to victims of sexual assault.

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Pastoral care protocol for victims of sexual assault

Pastoral Care Protocol for Victims of Sexual Assault

By Chaplains David Scheider, Ronald Thomas, Peter Frederich, and Tom Waynick


Introduction
Introduction

  • By following this simple protocol, you will be able to offer effective pastoral care and counseling to victims of sexual assault.

  • The protocol forms the word “SPIRIT.”

See Notes below for references


Army policy
Army Policy

  • Sexual Assault is a crime and has no place in the Army.

  • Sexual Assault degrades readiness.

  • Holds those who commit offenses accountable.

  • Use training, education, and awareness to eliminate incidents.

  • Applies 24/7

  • Victim treated with dignity, fairness, and respect.

  • Victim given appropriate medical care and counseling.


Why this why now why us
Why This? Why Now? Why Us?

  • Increase in reported Incidents of Rape

    • Media Attention

    • Reports from OIF

  • Military Leadership Concern

    • Secretary of Defense

  • Leadership’s Focus:

    • Prevention

      • Chaplains are NOT Trainers

    • Respectful Care for Victims

      • Chaplains are Care Providers


Why chaplains
Why Chaplains?

  • Confidentiality

  • Victim Complaint: “Everybody who can help is a mandated reporter! I’m not going to talk if that means I lose control of the process. I’m not sure I want to end up becoming part of a court martial…”


Dod confidentiality policy
DoD Confidentiality Policy

  • Protect victim and treat them with dignity, respect and provide appropriate support services (medical, advocacy, counseling).

  • Prefers complete reporting and accountability of actions.

  • Provides restricted and unrestricted reporting.

  • Outlines exceptions to confidentiality


Umts and confidentiality
UMTs and Confidentiality

  • Unit Ministry Teams will not report unless the victim releases them to do so.

  • If Victim Decides NOT to report, UMTs:

    • * Encourage Medical Treatment

    • * Inform why reporting is important

    • * Describe Avenues for Confidential Reporting

  • Reporting Options:

    • * Open Reporting

    • * Confidential/Restricted Reporting


Privileged confidential avenues
Privileged & Confidential Avenues

  • Unit chaplains

  • Legal assistance attorneys

  • Medical personnel

  • Army One Source Program

    • CONUS: 1-800-464-8107

    • From the approved TSP for Initial Entry Training “Army’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Training.”


Recommendation theater process

Reports?

Reports?

Reports in Post

-

Deployment Brief?

Aspects that are

Aspects that are

Aspects that are

=

=

=

unique to in theater

unique to in theater

unique to in theater

Recommendation – Theater Process

Seven Possible Victim

Seven Possible Victim

Responses…

Responses…

Results…

Results…

1. Contacts

1. Contacts

Victim Advocate

Victim Advocate

Victim

Victim

Follow

Follow

-

-

up care

up care

provides support,

provides support,

Advocate*

Advocate*

provided, as

provided, as

reports status to

reports status to

Victim Advocate

Victim Advocate

needed

needed

CoC

CoC

, and

, and

(reports to

(reports to

CoC

CoC

2. Reports to

2. Reports to

coordinates

coordinates

immediately)

immediately)

Command

Command

any of the

any of the

across potentially

across potentially

action is taken

action is taken

available victim

available victim

dispersed

dispersed

services (i.e.,

services (i.e.,

Case

Case

services**:

services**:

medical, legal,

medical, legal,

management

management

law

law

data reported

data reported

enforcement,

enforcement,

(from all victim

(from all victim

Medical

Medical

Informs Victim

Informs Victim

CID, Chaplain,

CID, Chaplain,

services)

services)

Services

Services

Contacts

Contacts

CoC

CoC

CoC

CoC

Informs Sr.

Informs Sr.

Advocate

Advocate

EO)

EO)

Mission

Mission

Coordinator within

Coordinator within

Commander

Commander

Legal Services

Legal Services

24 hours

24 hours

3. Reports to,

3. Reports to,

or is discovered

or is discovered

Law

Law

by,

by,

CoC

CoC

Enforcement

Enforcement

4. Checks the

4. Checks the

Learns reporting

Learns reporting

Yes

Yes

CID

CID

website or

website or

Reports?

Reports?

options

options

contacts hotline

contacts hotline

No

No

Sexual

Sexual

Chaplain

Chaplain

End

End

Assault

Assault

VAC conducts

VAC conducts

Friend informs of

Friend informs of

Occurs

Occurs

analysis at local level

analysis at local level

Yes

Yes

5. Tells a friend

5. Tells a friend

his/her need to

his/her need to

EO

EO

for use by SARB in

for use by SARB in

Reports?

Reports?

report

report

program review and

program review and

No

No

provides trend data to

provides trend data to

End

End

6. Seeks out

6. Seeks out

HQDA on regular

HQDA on regular

Yes

Yes

Advised of option to

Advised of option to

confidential

confidential

basis

basis

Reports?

Reports?

channel (e.g.,

channel (e.g.,

report

report

chaplain)

chaplain)

No

No

Continuation of

Continuation of

Pastoral care

Pastoral care

Actions taken to

Actions taken to

improve program

improve program

Yes

Yes

7. Does

7. Does

Reports in Post

Reports in Post

-

-

and/or climate

and/or climate

* This option to directly contact the

* This option to directly contact the

Nothing

Nothing

Deployment Brief?

Deployment Brief?

Victim Advocate mirrors the current

Victim Advocate mirrors the current

IG and EO Army programs

IG and EO Army programs

No

No

**Access to services may

**Access to services may

End

End

= Chain of Command Emphasis

take longer in theater

take longer in theater


Recommendation garrison process

Results…

1. Contacts

Victim

Advocate /

Follow

-

up care

Coordinator*

provided, as

needed

Command

action is taken

Case

management

data reported

(from all victim

Informs Victim

services)

Contacts

CoC

CoC

Informs

Advocate

Garrison

Coordinator within

Commander

24 hours

3. Reports to,

or is discovered

by,

CoC

VAC conducts analysis

at local level for use by

SARB in program review

Yes

and provides trend data

Reports?

Reports?

Reports?

to HQDA on regular

No

basis

End

Reports?

Actions taken to improve

program and/or climate

Reflects adoption

of best practices

=

(e.g., Navy SAVI

program)

* This option to directly contact the

Victim Advocate mirrors the current

IG and EO Army programs

Recommendation – Garrison Process

Eight Possible Victim

Eight Possible Victim

Responses…

Responses…

Results…

1. Contacts

Victim

Victim Advocate

Victim Advocate

Advocate /

provides support,

provides support,

Follow

-

up care

Coordinator*

reports status to

reports status to

Victim Advocate

Victim Advocate

provided, as

CoC

CoC

, and

, and

(reports to

(reports to

CoC

CoC

needed

coordinates across

coordinates across

immediately)

immediately)

2. Reports to

2. Reports to

services:

services:

Command

any of the

any of the

action is taken

available victim

available victim

Medical Services

Medical Services

services (i.e.,

services (i.e.,

Case

Legal Services

Legal Services

medical, legal,

medical, legal,

management

Law Enforcement

Law Enforcement

law

law

data reported

CID

CID

enforcement,

enforcement,

(from all victim

Chaplain

Chaplain

Informs Victim

CID, Chaplain,

CID, Chaplain,

services)

Contacts

CoC

CoC

Informs

FAP

FAP

Advocate

FAP, EO)

FAP, EO)

Garrison

EO

EO

Coordinator within

Commander

24 hours

3. Reports to,

or is discovered

by,

CoC

VAC conducts analysis

at local level for use by

4. Checks the

4. Checks the

SARB in program review

Learns reporting

Learns reporting

Yes

website or

website or

and provides trend data

options

options

contacts hotline

contacts hotline

to HQDA on regular

No

Sexual

Sexual

basis

End

Assault

Assault

Occurs

Occurs

Friend informs of

Friend informs of

Yes

Yes

5. Tells a friend

5. Tells a friend

his/her need to

his/her need to

Reports?

Reports?

report

report

No

No

End

End

Actions taken to improve

6. Seeks out

6. Seeks out

program and/or climate

Advised of option to

Advised of option to

confidential

confidential

Yes

Yes

Reports?

Reports?

report

report

channel (e.g.,

channel (e.g.,

Reflects adoption

chaplain)

chaplain)

No

No

Continuation

Continuation

of best practices

=

of Pastoral

of Pastoral

(e.g., Navy SAVI

care

care

program)

7. Seeks non

7. Seeks non

-

-

Med. services notified

Med. services notified

Yes

Yes

Suspect

Suspect

military medical

military medical

(treatment reason

(treatment reason

= Chain of Command Emphasis

sexual

sexual

support

support

unknown)

unknown)

assault?

assault?

* This option to directly contact the

Continuation of

Continuation of

8. Does

8. Does

Victim Advocate mirrors the current

medical care

medical care

No

No

End

End

Nothing

Nothing

IG and EO Army programs


Topics of discussion
Topics of Discussion

  • Setting a supportive environment

  • Pacing for gathering details

  • Information sharing

  • Restoring the person to life

  • Integrating the new experience into her/his identity

  • Thinking theologically about sexual assault


S etting a supportive environment
Setting a Supportive Environment

  • Allow the survivor to control the setting.

  • Do not touch her/him.

  • Clean the office area. A messy space may feel chaotic to the person.

  • Sit at least 3 feet away and ask if sitting close is threatening


P acing for gathering details
Pacing for Gathering Details

  • Allow the person to reveal the information at her/his pace.

  • Aggressive questions for details feel invasive to survivors of sexual assault.

  • Forcing her/him to recall details may bring back feelings of despair resulting in isolation, or in some cases, self-medicating or suicide attempts after the discussion.

  • Eventually, sharing the memories when he/she is ready, in a supportive atmosphere, can be healing.

  • It is not essential that the victim share the sexual assault details with you.


I nformation sharing
Information Sharing

  • Discuss and give handouts for the following:

    • What is normal to feel when sexually assaulted?

    • Referral information. (Important to know the referral persons and what they do.)

    • Texas Association Against Sexual Assault (www.taasa.org) has download pamphlets.


I nformation sharing resources
Information Sharing- Resources

  • Chain of Command

  • Medical facilities

  • Legal (Staff Judge Advocate)

  • Army Community Services

  • Military Police

  • Local police/medical/victim services

  • Military Once Source hotline

  • Restricted or Unrestricted reporting and why it is important to consider reporting


R estoring the person to life
Restoring the Person to Life

Help the survivor restore his/her life:

  • Rest –

    • victims often do not get sufficient sleep or escape from the traumatic stress. May need medical attention for sleep problems. Some victims of trauma find meditation and massage therapy helpful in restoring life.

  • Re-attach to family and friends.

    • Very important to have enjoyable times with significant others to restore sense of normality.


R estoring the person to life1
Restoring the Person to Life

Be aware of signs of the following:

  • secondary victimization

  • secondary traumatization

  • PTSD

  • Suicidal ideation

  • Religious implications

  • Cultural implications

    .


R estoring the victim to life cont
Restoring the Victim to Life (cont.)

  • Routine

    • Important to feeling safe again.

  • Safety is vital.

    • If the victim works with or lives near the offender, this needs to be addressed.

  • Reduce the number of people who know about the sexual assault.

    • The victim needs to be free from people asking about the sexual assault while he/she is at work and pursuing life and routine.


I ntegrating the experience
Integrating the Experience

Help the Victim to:

  • Accept the Reality of the Sexual Assault

    • Many victims blame themselves.

    • Many will not call it sexual assault if they know the offender.

    • Most believe the myths from our culture around sexual assault. Need to explore these myths with him/her.

    • Do not blame the victim or accuse them of sinning.

    • He/she is still a loved and valued member of the community and family.

  • Identify how he/she is the Same and Different from before

  • Find Supportive Friends/Community


Practical exercise
Practical Exercise

  • Myths and Facts about Rape:

    • Categorize the following statements as “myth” or “fact”

      Myths: Facts:


Myth or fact 1 of 4
Myth or Fact (1 of 4)

  • Rape is perpetrated by people the victim knows and in places that are deemed safe.

  • Almost 10% of men are rape victims in their lifetime.

  • Sexual Assault is a crime of passion

  • Rape is an impulsive act.


Myth or fact 2 of 4
Myth or Fact (2 of 4)

  • Most rape accusations are falsely reported from women who try to cover infidelity or are angry at the man for other reasons.

  • Clothing, alcohol, and companionship are signs that a woman consents to sex.

  • If you don’t fight, the rape is your fault.


Myth or fact 3 of 4
Myth or Fact (3 of 4)

  • The victim must struggle. Lack of struggle implies consent.

  • Nice, religious women rarely get raped because they keep company with people with higher morals and send fewer seductive signals.

  • Alcohol consumption is often involved in rape so it is may be the cause of men raping women.

  • Most women are raped by men of another race who would otherwise have no chance to have sex with them.


Myth or fact 4 of 4
Myth or Fact (4 of 4)

  • Rape is always a crime, but not always prosecutable. For every 100 rapes:

    • 8 are arrested

    • 7 are charged

    • 3 are convicted

    • 2 receive prison terms


T hinking t heologically about rape
Thinking Theologically about Rape

  • Survivors may want to discuss their experience with a Chaplain. Some common questions:

    • Have I sinned because I put myself in a compromising position with the assailant? (Often alcohol and drugs are involved.)

    • Should I forgive the attacker?

    • I got an abortion because I was pregnant from the rape. Is that wrong?

    • Where was God when I got sexually assaulted?

    • Is it ok to be angry with God?

    • Chaplain, why did God let this happen to me?

  • Guiding Focus: What is the most Pastoral Response?


Summary
Summary

By following the SPIRIT protocol you will provide a supportive, caring environment in which a victim of sexual assault may find compassion, information, and guidance as she/he works to recover a sense of normalcy in life. You will act the part of a modern day Good Samaritan who did not pass by the victim, but met his/her needs of comfort, healing, and assistance.


Practical exercise1
Practical Exercise

  • Break into groups of three.

  • Take turns being the observer, the pastoral care-giver (PC), and the survivor.

  • Survivor – put yourself into the role of being sexually assaulted. Use the scenario on the next slide if you want.

  • Observer – coach the PC in the protocol and give feedback. Ask yourself, “If he was caring for my loved one who had been sexually assaulted, what would I want him to do or say?”


Scenario 1
Scenario #1

  • Stay in your own gender. I.e.. If you are male, act the part of a male survivor.

  • You are deployed and have been shaken by a recent attack on your convoy. You have now returned to Base and you seek out a trusted soldier to talk.

  • While you are emotionally vulnerable, he appears to comfort you. Eventually he crosses the boundaries and forces himself on you sexually.

  • Afterwards he seems unaware that he has violated you sexually.

  • What do you feel?

  • You have heard Chaplains and assistants keep everything confidential and are trained in caring for victims of sexual assault. You decide to talk with your unit UMT.


Scenario 2
Scenario #2

  • You are new to a unit. Members of your platoon invite you to a party. You want to make friends and feel they are trustworthy.

  • At the party you have several drinks. One man invites you to a private spot to talk.

  • After kissing, he forces you to have sex.

  • Afterwards you wonder how you let that happen and find yourself feeling increasingly depressed.

  • You decide to discuss this situation with your chaplain or assistant.


Scenario 3
Scenario # 3

  • A friend visits your room with several of his friends.

  • One produces a bottle of alcohol and everyone has a drink.

  • Your friend leaves and his friends stay behind.

  • The soldiers force themselves on you sexually.

  • Afterwards you seek medical attention and they notice bruises and tearing.

  • CID investigates the incident and tells you that the other soldiers said it was consensual. The case is dropped.

  • The commander punishes you for violating the no alcohol policy in a combat zone.

  • How do you feel?

  • A friend suggests you talk to the chaplain.



Back up slides1
BACK UP SLIDES

DoD Policy Summary

  • Restricted and unrestricted avenues

  • of reporting available to victim.

  • Essential training tasks for responders.

  • Designates Sexual Assault Response

  • Coordinators (SARC)

  • Designates Victim Advocates (VA)


Back up slides2
BACK UP SLIDES

DoD Policy Summary

  • Defines covered communications and

  • provides exceptions to confidentiality.

Covered Communication: oral, written, or

electronic communications of personally

identifiable information made by a victim to

the SARC, VA, or healthcare provider related

to their sexual assault.


Back up slides3
BACK UP SLIDES

DoD Policy Summary

  • Defines covered communications and

  • provides exceptions to confidentiality.

See notes to slide 6 for exceptions.


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