Lamb to the Slaughter
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 13

Lamb to the Slaughter Vocabulary PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 179 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Lamb to the Slaughter Vocabulary. T ranquil 1. Free from commotion or disturbance. 2. Free from anxiety, tension, or restlessness; composed. Steady; even: a tranquil flame . Origin : 1595–1605; earlier tranquill < L tranquillus quiet, calm, still. Translucent

Download Presentation

Lamb to the Slaughter Vocabulary

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Lamb to the Slaughter

Vocabulary


Tranquil

1. Free from commotion or disturbance.

2. Free from anxiety, tension, or restlessness; composed.

Steady; even: a tranquil flame.

Origin: 1595–1605; earlier tranquill < L tranquillus quiet, calm, still


Translucent

1. permitting light to pass through but diffusing it so that persons, objects, etc., on the opposite side are not clearly visible: Frostedwindow glass is translucent but not transparent.

2. easily understandable; lucid: a translucent explication.

3. clear; transparent: translucent seawater.

Origin: 1590–1600; < L trānslūcent-


Placid

1. Undisturbed by tumult or disorder; calm or quiet.

Satisfied; complacent.

3. Origin: 1620–30; < L placidus calm, quiet, akin to placēre to please


Luxuriate

1. To take luxurious pleasure; indulge oneself.

2. To proliferate.

3. To grow profusely; thrive.

Origin: 1615–25; < L luxuriātus, ptp. of luxuriāre.


Origin: 1675


Frantic

adjective 1. desperate or wild with excitement, passion, fear, pain, etc.; frenzied. 2. Archaic. insane; mad.

Origin: 1325–75; ME frantik, frenetik < OF frenetique < L phrenēticus delirious < Gk phrenētikós.


Parcel

an object, article, container, or quantity of something wrapped or packed up; small package; bundle.

a quantity or unit of something, as of a commodity for sale; lot.

a group, collection, or assemblage of persons or things.

a distinct, continuous portion or tract of land.

a part, portion, or fragment

1275–1325; ME < MF parcelle < LL *particella,


  • Congealed

  • to change from a soft or fluid state to a rigid or solid state, as by cooling or freezing: The fat congealed on the top of the soup.

  • to curdle; coagulate, as a fluid.

  • to make or become fixed, as ideas, sentiments, or principles: Some philosophic systems lost their vitality and congealed.

  • Origin: 1350–1400; ME congelen (< MF congeler) < L congelāre, equiv. to con- con- + gelāre to freeze; see gelid


Premises

Also, premiss. Logic. a proposition supporting or helping to support a conclusion.

a. premises, a. a tract of land including its buildings. b. a building together with its grounds or other appurtenances. c. the property forming the subject of a conveyance or bequest.

a basis, stated or assumed, on which reasoning proceeds. b. an earlier statement in a document. c. (in a bill in equity) the statement of facts upon which the complaint is based.


Spanner

a person or thing that spans.

Also called spanner wrench. a wrench having a curved head with a hook or pin at one end for engaging notches or holes in collars, certain kinds of nuts, etc. Compare pin wrench.

3. Chiefly British. a wrench, esp. one with fixed jaws


1175–1225; (n.) ME tru(f)fle idle talk, deceit < OF, var. of truf(f)e mockery, deceit; (v.) ME treoflen to mock < OF trufler to make sport of

Trifle

an article or thing of very little value.

a matter, affair, or circumstance of trivial importance or significance.

a small, inconsiderable, or trifling sum of money.

4. a small quantity or amount of anything; a little: She's still a trifle angry.

1175–1225; (n.) ME tru(f)fle idle talk, deceit < OF, var. of truf(f)e mockery, deceit; (v.) ME treoflen to mock < OF trufler to make sport of

Exasperated

to irritate or provoke to a high degree.

To increase the intensity or violence of


verb (used with object), -soled, -sol⋅ing.


  • Login