The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center
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The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics NSF Physics Frontier Center. What are the origins of the elements? Why do stars explode? What is the physics of compact stars?. PAN 2006 Introduction. Science at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics.

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The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

The Joint Institute for Nuclear AstrophysicsNSF Physics Frontier Center

What are the origins of the elements?

Why do stars explode?

What is the physics of compact stars?

PAN 2006 Introduction

Science at the intersectionof nuclear physics and astrophysics


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics

The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics

Core Institutions

University of Notre Dame

Michigan State University

University of Chicago

Associate Institutions

University of Arizona

Arizona State University

University of California (SB, SC)

Argonne National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory

ViSTAR-GSI

Collaborations

SciDAC SN Center

SDSS-II-SEGUE

DUSEL

RIA-ARIA

12 research groups –

20 faculty members -

21 postdocs - 25 graduate students


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

JINA research

Observing what the eyes cannot see

OBSERVATION

What makes a supernova explode?

Understanding what is observed

THEORY

What are the origins of the elements?

What is the physics of compact stars?

Replicating in the laboratory stellar processes observed and theorized

EXPERIMENT


The jina collaboration network

Nuclear Physics Theory

Nuclear Physics Experiment

Mengoni

Käppeler

Paul

Heil

Iliadis

Langanke

Chamon

Ugalde

Dababneh

Brown

Mathews

Wiescher

O’Brian

Rapp

Tang

Palumbo

Görres

Aprahamian

Rehm

Ahmad

Beard

Ashenfelter

Primas

Jiang

Couture

Wöhr

Truran

Collon

Fisker

Townsley

Davids

Sun

Afanasjev

Calder

Kratz

Piro

Gasques

Bildsten

Woosley

Thielemann

Sherrill

Lattanzio

Chang

Lynch

Arras

Cole

Lugaro

Hosmer

Cummings

Karakas

Austin

Clement

Yakovlev

Schatz

Burles

Beers

Mantica

Brown

Thompson

Estrade

Santi

DeYoung

Montes

Ouelette

Gallino

Famiano

Christlieb

Herwig

Glasner

Cowan

Heger

Sneden

Reifarth

Livne

Murphy

Fryer

Burrows

Astrophysics Observation

Astrophysics Theory

The JINA collaboration Network


Major research focus components

Major Research Focus & Components

MRC1 - Nucleosynthesis

and Stellar Evolution

MRC2 - Nucleosynthesis in

Supernova Shock Front

MRC3 - Nucleosynthesis in

Cataclysmic Binaries


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

MRC1

Nuclear reactions determine the life times

of stars and our sun – 6 billion years

Nuclear reactions drive

stellar explosions – 6 milliseconds

Nuclear processes are the

engine of the Universe !

The active (radioactive) Universe


14 n p 15 o and the limits of measurement

14N(p,)15O and the limits of measurement

MRC1

Top line is previous accepted value; bottom line is present measurement.

New experiments at

LUNA, LENA, TAMU

confirm lower S-factor

extrapolation !

  • reduction of total reaction rate

  • increases globular cluster age by ~1 billion years


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

MRC2

Each heavy atom in our body was built

and processed through ~40 supernova

explosions since the beginning of time!

We are made of star stuff

Carl Sagan


Success stories

MRC2

Cocktail beam

78Ni

1.E+02

1.E+01

Observed Abundances

1.E+00

Model Calculation with 460ms

Abundance

Model calculations with 110ms

1.E-01

1.E-02

70

120

170

220

Mass (A)

Success Stories

110 ms instead of

predicted 460 ms


Simulated supernova

Simulated Supernova


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

Surface of accreting neutron stars

MRC 3

Neutron star surface

Nuclearreactions

Radiativecooling

H,He

spallation

gas

thermonuclear

ashes

ocean

thermonuclear

outer

crust

Electroncapture

Innercrust

pycnonuclear

n cooling

D. Page


Simulated x ray burst

Simulated X-Ray Burst


The tools toys of jina

The Tools & Toys of JINA

Plan for St. George @ ND

NERO Detector @ MSU

FN Tandem Accelerator @ ND

Large Binocular Telescope


The pan program

The PAN program

  • Why?

  • To educate teachers and young students about nuclear astrophysics

  • To create awareness of the research being performed in this field

  • To interest young people in nuclear (astro) physics (career option?)

  • How?

  • Lectures to provide theoretical back ground

    • By NSCL Faculty on a wide variety of subjects

  • Hands-on! Built a cosmic ray detector, decay lab.

  • Stimulate informal discussion

  • Program aimed at providing material that can be used in the class room

  • Teach general data analysis skills


The schedule

The schedule


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

10-2 m insects


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

10-5 m: a lymphocyte (cell for immune system)

Scale of cellular biology


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

10-8 m: DNA

A double helix structure


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

10-10 m: atom

Field Emission Scanning Microscope image

of Platinum surface


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

10-14 m: The nucleus

12C (6 protons and 6 neutrons)


10 15 m nucleons the particle zoo

10-15m: nucleons & the particle zoo

cosmic rays


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

10-16 m: quarks and gluons

The smallest known building blocks


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

nuclear physics


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

particle physics


The joint institute for nuclear astrophysics nsf physics frontier center

quark-gluon physics

long island


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