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Worldviews in Counseling. Attitudes. Values. Assumptions. Make Decisions. Behave. Define events. Worldviews are…. One’s perspective on how the world works - one’s place in the world and in relationships. Worldviews. Worldview Defined (continued).

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Worldviews are

Attitudes

Values

Assumptions

Make Decisions

Behave

Define events

Worldviews are…

  • One’s perspective on how the world works - one’s place in the world and in relationships.

Worldviews


Worldview defined continued
Worldview Defined (continued)

  • Correlated with cultural upbringing and life experiences.

  • Experiences of oppression, racism (or other isms), societal barriers are incorporated into worldview.

  • Can talk about group level worldview.

    • Also about individual level as SES, gender, education, age, etc. influence worldview.


Worldviews in counseling1
Worldviews in Counseling

  • Both counselor and client have own worldviews.

  • Worldviews frame the definition of the counseling “problem” and also what solutions are considered.

  • Worldviews guide what counseling “looks like” - our theories come from certain worldviews.


  • When worldviews differ (with no awareness of that cultural difference), negative traits might be attributed to people holding differing worldviews.

  • Similarly, definitions of normality and mental health (or lack thereof) can be based on the counselors’ worldviews - often the counseling worldview is based on dominant group’s values.


Kluckhohn and strodtbeck value orientations model
Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck Value-Orientations Model difference), negative traits might be attributed to people holding differing worldviews.


Locus of control responsibility
Locus of control/responsibility difference), negative traits might be attributed to people holding differing worldviews.

  • Locus of control - reinforcements are contingent on my actions (internal) or what I do has no effect on what happens to me (external).

  • Locus of responsibility - where is the primary responsibility for what occurs in my life? Is it on me (internal) or are there sociocultural forces that structure my life (external-system)?


Quadrant model
Quadrant Model difference), negative traits might be attributed to people holding differing worldviews.


Biracial or multiracial individuals

Biracial or Multiracial Individuals difference), negative traits might be attributed to people holding differing worldviews.


  • Census 2000, 2.4% marked 2 or more races (6.8 million). Reporting difficulties and tradition of identifying with one parent suggest underreporting this number.

  • Not until 1967 that last state dropped laws against interracial marriages (anti-miscegenation laws). Thus, for many years, these children were illegal.

  • Currently, less attention/knowledge to biracial individuals.


Myths
Myths Reporting difficulties and tradition of identifying with one parent suggest underreporting this number.

  • Stereotype of marginalized tragic figure (early research focused on confusion, lower self-esteem).

  • Biracial children must choose to identify with 1 parent (racial group) - usually the parent of color in a White/other relationship - to be healthy.

  • Biracial people don’t want to discuss racial identity.


More accurate beliefs
More Accurate Beliefs Reporting difficulties and tradition of identifying with one parent suggest underreporting this number.

  • Research does not indicate that multiethnic children have more, or more serious mental health issues than general population.

  • While multiracial individuals may feel pressure to identify with only 1 part of ethnic heritage, healthy development involves an integration of cultural backgrounds into new identity.

  • Parents can help in developing this new identity by openly exploring family’s cultural background.


  • On average, multiracial kids develop awareness of race and racial differences earlier that monoracial children (ages 3-4).

  • Adolescence can be particularly difficult as peers become less tolerant then. Vacillation between identification with 1 parent and the other may occur in the process of integrating both. Desire to fit in.

    • Dating accentuates race issues


Kerwin et al qualitative study
Kerwin et al. qualitative study racial differences earlier that monoracial children (ages 3-4).

  • Parents struggled with using or not using racially identifiable labels.

  • Parents were concerned about preparing children for anticipated discrimination.

  • Some felt their children would be uniquely prepared to deal with differences among people.

  • Location was important for finding racially diverse and open neighborhood.


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