The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 25

THE SPANISH PEDAGOGICAL DISCOURSE OF BILINGUAL STUDENT/TEACHERS PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 74 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language Education February 19-21, 2010. THE SPANISH PEDAGOGICAL DISCOURSE OF BILINGUAL STUDENT/TEACHERS . Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]> University of California, Davis School of Education.

Download Presentation

THE SPANISH PEDAGOGICAL DISCOURSE OF BILINGUAL STUDENT/TEACHERS

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

THE SPANISH PEDAGOGICAL DISCOURSE OF BILINGUAL STUDENT/TEACHERS

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Mainstream Language

classroom

Foreign Language

classroom

  • WRITING

Heritage Language

classroom

Second Language

classroom

  • Students’

  • perspective

  • Writing Process

  • Oral to writing

  • Reading to writing

  • Academic Literacy

  • Different contexts

  • Teachers’

  • perspective

  • Writing instruction/teaching

  • Feedback

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

  • BILINGUAL

  • TEACHERS’ WRITING

  • SPANISH

  • Few courses in Spanish for teachers

  • Second language acquisition, diversity,

  • multiculturalism, etc.

  • Strategies for English Learners.

  • Topics in English.

  • To develop high level of Spanish

  • Proficiency (colloquial and academic registers)

  • Teachers’ language awareness

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

RESEARCH QUESTION

Which linguistic features characterize the pedagogical discourse

written in Spanish by undergraduate students and student/teachers

pursuing a bilingual teaching credential?

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

SETTING

  • Classes conducted inSpanish

  • Instruction based onhands-on activities

  • Student-centered activities

  • Authentic reading (articles)

  • Purposeful writing (journal)

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

PARTICIPANTS (N=15)

7 undergraduate students 8 BCLAD students 12 females/ 3 males 4 born in Spanish speaking countries14 heritage speakers

Strong writers (5 BCLAD/ 4 Undergrad)

Weak writers ( 3 BCLAD/ 3 undergrad)

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

METHOD OF ANALYSIS

  • Language in context (situated)

  • Meaningful

  • Users of language

  • Social Constructivism

  • Writing activity within the profession

  • Systemic Functional Linguistics

  • Interpersonal, Experiential and Modal dimensions

  • DATA COLLECTION

  • 135 JOURNALS

  • 30 COMMENTS

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Interpersonal dimension

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Interpersonal dimension

Which type of distance did writers establish with their interlocutor?

Did writers present an outside

or an inside perspective of the

teaching role?

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Interpersonal dimension short distance

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Interpersonal dimension: SHORT DISTANCE

To give explicit instructions:

lo trozas en tiras… del color que más te guste…pones a calentar agua y le agregas harina y lo revuelves hasta que te quede una consistencia algo espesa …

(“… you break it in stripes … of the color you like the most…

(you) heat water and add flour and stir until you get some stick consistency…”)

To explain procedures

Por ejemplo, cuando estás dividiendo el dividendo es el número que estás dividiendo …

(“For example, when you are dividing, the dividend is the number that you are dividing…” )

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Interpersonal dimension: SHORT DISTANCE

Togeneralize the participant/s

La alternancia de códigos es cuando cambias de lengua/registro…

(“Code alternation is when you change language/register…”)

To narrow the addresseetoeducational agents

Por ejemplo, al hacer un libro tú misma/o puedes modificarlo específicamente para tus estudiantes…

(“For example, when making a book you can modify it, especially for your students…“).

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Interpersonal dimension teaching position

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Continuum from outside:he/she/they (“teacher(s); student(s); the classroom”).

The other

Interpersonal dimension TEACHING position

To inside perspective:I/We (as teachers), (“my/our future students”), impersonal forms (“one as a teacher”)

Inclusive

Undergrad and BCLAD students were closing the gap between outsiders/insiders.

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Experiential dimension

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Experiential dimension

Did writers incorporate technical words and expressions from the educational field ?

Did writers reflect on their own Spanish development?

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Experiential dimension

PEDAGOGICAL TERMS

Content-based specific: balanza (“scale”), pentagrama, común denominador (“common denominator”)

Educational vocabulary: Alfabetización (“literacy”), investigaciones escolares (“scholastic investigations”), facilitar el aprendizaje (“to facilitate the learning”).

Technical vocabulary: Andamiaje (“scaffolding”), zona de desarrollo próximo (“Zone of proximal development”).

Acronyms:BICS, CALP, EFL, ELD .

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Experiential dimension

PEDAGOGICAL TERMS

La característica de integración de lengua y aéreas de contenido enfoca la teoría que dice si les integras vocabulario a los estudiantes a corta edad sobre un tema… esos estudiantes van a entender la materia mejor... En la lectura sobre el aprendizaje los estudiantes aprendieron sobre la materia de ciencias…

(“The characteristic of language and content areas integration focuses on the theory that saysthat if you integrate vocabulary about a topic to the students at early age … these students are going to better understand the subject matter…In the reading about learning, students learned about science subject…”).

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Experiential dimensionSPANISH LANGUAGE AWARENESS

Structure: comparison and contrast between L1 and L2.

Vocabulary: specialized, technical terms.

Register: colloquial/formal Spanish,

Academic language.

Sociolinguistic notions: norm, dialects and variants.

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Experiential dimensionSPANISH LANGUAGE AWARENESS

Yo no sabía la palabra esfumar. Yo sé cómo hacerlo cuando estoy usando

los pasteles al óleo, pero no sabía la palabra en español.

(“I did not know the word shade painting. I know how to do it when

I am using oleo pastels, but I did not know the word in Spanish”).

… En el pasado, mi vocabulario sobre materias siempre ha sido un vocabulario “de la calle” por decir. Lo importante sobre el español formal es que *en un lugar como la escuela tiene que desarrollar al estudiante en forma escolar.

(…“In the past my vocabulary about subject matters have always been, say a “street”vocabulary. The important (thing) about formal Spanish is that *in a place like school, it has to develop the student in a scholar way”).

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Modal dimension

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

MODal dimension

How did writers present the reading material? Did they elaborate ideas from the text?

Did writers present an outside or an inside perspective of the reading material?

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

MODal dimension

PRESENTATION OF TEXTS’ IDEAS

From…

Projecting clauses:

… el artículo dice que (“the article says that”)

… la teoría explica que (“the theory explains…”)….

El autor menciona que… (“The author mentions that”).

Quotes and citations, verbatim.

To…

Abstract expressions and nominal clauses

El artículo discutió el uso del arte con literatura

(“The article discussed the use of art with literature…”)

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Modal dimension inside outside perspective

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Modal DIMENSIONINSIDE/OUTSIDE PERSPECTIVE

Continuum from detached and external perspectives to integrated use of the reading material/theory to the practical teaching experience.

Negotiating meaning with the author. It includes:

Expressing opinion, (dis) agreements, (dis) satisfaction: me parece bien (“I think it is right”), no me gustó cuando… (“I did not like when…”) , etc.

Use of modal verbs (“should/must”), etc.

Objective impersonal constructions, es necesario (“it is necessary” ), es evidente (“it is evident”), etc.

Subjective impersonal expressions, es obvio (“It is obvious”), está claro ( “it is clear”), etc.

Do’s and don’ts : teachers’ value system.

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Modal dimension inside outside perspective1

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Modal DIMENSIONINSIDE/OUTSIDE PERSPECTIVE

Para mí el artículo de Hudelson et al. …nosotros, como maestras/os podamos tener las conversaciones… Yo, como maestra, reconozco la importancia del arte … en mi salón… Finalmente, yo creo que …necesitamos plantear problemas que van a desafiar a nuestros estudiantes… Los artículos han demostrado cómo el arte puede ser un gran beneficio para la educación denuestros estudiantes…

(“To me the article by Hudelson et al. … we as teachers can keep our conversations…. As a teacher I recognize the importance of art … in my classroom… Finally, I believe that… we need to state problems that are going to challenge our students… Articles have showed how art can be very beneficial to our students’education …”)

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Results 1

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

The participants of this study

showed a general progress

in their writing skills in Spanish,

based on increasing exposure

and practice.

Their texts grew in length, expansion, and elaboration.

RESULTS 1

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Results 2

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

In-depth analysis showed two main areas of growth:

1) Development of a teaching

Position.

2) Development of Spanish for

pedagogical purposes.

RESULTS 2

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


Conclusion summary

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

Creation of a pedagogical discourse based on:1) Close distance and assumption of a teaching position (Interpersonal dimension).

2) Technical vocabulary from the educational field and reflection upon one’s language development (Experiential dimension).

3) Blend of authoritative voices (theory) and teaching experience (Modal dimension).

Conclusion/SUMMARY

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

DISCUSSION

Perspective as professionals in education

Teacher’s discourse in Spanish includes colloquial

and academic registers.

Most successful writers combined sayings,

comparisons and examples from everyday

language, with technical terms, nominalizations and abstract expressions from academic language.

To support their position as bilingual teachers,

they express a set of values by means of modal verbs (should/must) expressing the do’s and don'ts.

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


The spanish pedagogical discourse of bilingual student teachers

First International Conference on Heritage/Community Language EducationFebruary 19-21, 2010

PEDAGOGICAL DISCOURSE

Como maestros nosotrostenemos la obligación de

hacer nuestro salón y la escuela un lugar donde todos los padres

se sientan incluidos y dispuestos a hacer preguntas y participar...

Como maestrospodemos realmente conectar con los padres

y tenerlos de nuestro lado para formar una alianza en la educación de su hijo/a.

(“As teachers wehave the obligation of making our class

and school a place where all parents feel included and able

to make questions and participate...

As teachers wecan really connect with parents and have

them at our side to make an alliance in their

son/daughter’s education”).

Laura Dubcovsky <[email protected]>

University of California, Davis

School of Education


  • Login