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Creation of a Literary Analysis Essay. Mr. Ward’s English. Format for Papers:. All of the literary papers you will write in this class will consist of three main parts: INTRO w/THESIS Body Paragraphs Topic Sentences, FACTS (Concrete Details), and ANALYSIS (Commentary) Conclusion. Thesis:.

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format for papers
Format for Papers:
  • All of the literary papers you will write in this class will consist of three main parts:
  • INTRO w/THESIS
  • Body Paragraphs
    • Topic Sentences, FACTS (Concrete Details), and ANALYSIS (Commentary)
  • Conclusion
thesis
Thesis:
  • The thesis tells the reader what the writer will prove in the essay
  • Tells the main idea of the paper
  • The last sentence of the introductory paragraph
  • Example:
    • Due to an experimental surgery, Charlie experienced advantages and disadvantages in his life and in his mind.
  • Example from freshman year:
    • Sanger Rainsford is an intelligent hunter who must outwit the General to save his life.
topic sentences
Topic Sentences
  • Occur at the beginning of each body paragraph.
  • Must NOT repeat any key words from the thesis, for it will be written directly after the thesis.
  • It must, however, connect directly with the thesis.
    • Thesis: Due to an experimental surgery, Charlie experienced advantages and disadvantages in his life and in his mind.
    • Topic Sentence: Charlie’s operation benefitted him in many ways.
  • The topic sentence will summarize the main idea of the paragraph just like the thesis summarizes the entire paper.
facts quotes
Facts (Quotes)
  • Is written directly after the topic sentence.
  • The “Facts” of your papers are examples from the story to help you prove your point.
  • They must be found in the story.
  • Direct quote: For example, the General gives Rainsford the option to hunt or the General will “turn him over to Ivan” (24).
  • Note: You are quoting the AUTHOR; therefore, anything that is written may be quoted.
  • After each quote, remember PPP
    • Parentheses, Page number, Period
      • “I was very skared [sic]” (170). The period is always last.
body paragraphs
Body Paragraphs
  • Quotes
    • Weave in quotes without speaker tags: DO NOT USE!! (he said, “…” she expressed, “…” etc.)
  • Also, we must shorten the quotes for emphasis.
    • “I figured out a new way to line up the machines at the factory and Mr. Donnegan says it will save him ten thousand dollars a year in labor.
  • Determine what can be omitted from the quote and could be added in your own words.
    • Charlie’s new found intelligence assists him at his work by “figur[ing] out a new way to line up the machines at the factory” (180).
    • Use brackets to change sentences: [ing] or [ed]
body paragraphs cont
Body Paragraphs cont.
  • When we include our quote we must remember: TLQ
    • Transition
    • Lead in
    • Quote
  • Original Sentence:
    • “This intelligence has driven a wedge between me and all the people I once knew and loved.”
  • For Example, although his newfound intelligence allowed him to experience life positively, he realized that it also had “driven a wedge between me and all the people I once knew and loved.”
body paragraphs cont1
Body Paragraphs cont.
  • Use brackets to change tenses or add -ing to words.
  • Also, you can use brackets and [sic] to signify a typo made by the author.
    • “I was very skared [sic].”
      • The adverb sic—meaning "intentionally so written"—first appeared in English circa 1856. It is derived from the Latin adverb sīc, which contains a long vowel and means "so", "thus", "as such" or "in such a manner".
  • After each quote, remember PPP
    • Parentheses, Page number, Period
      • “I was very skared [sic]” (170). The period is always last.
body paragraphs cont2
Body Paragraphs cont.
  • After the quotes, you need to provide at least two sentences of analysis.
    • The analysis should explain how the quote proves the Topic Sentence.
  • You CANNOT have facts in these sentences.
  • You must have two or more sentences of analysis for each fact.
    • Remember that you can always change your thesis and topic sentences to fit your analysis.
    • The analyses are the most important part of your essay.
    • These sentences bring “YOU” into the literature. Your voice/analyses is the important part of your paper.
well written papers
Well written Papers
  • When a writer uses only a series of facts, the paper is a book report. There are no individual THOUGHTS.
  • Therefore, when writing literary analysis, you must include opinions/explanations for your facts/quotes.
  • Do NOT use first or second person, EVER!
    • I, Me, My
    • We, Us, Our, Ours
    • You, Your, Yours
well written papers cont
Well written papers cont…
  • Do NOT use
    • should, would, could, maybe, may, might, must, seems, probably
      • These words signal irrelevant ideas or that you are unsure of your thoughts.
  • Avoid “Dead Words”:
    • a lot
    • really
    • good
    • very
    • bad
    • mean
    • nice
    • dumb
    • and any other over-used, general terms
well written papers cont1
Well written papers cont…
  • Be sure to put the titles of short stories in “quotation marks”.
  • Titles of novels should be underlined.
  • Be sure to spell main characters’ and authors’ names correctly.
  • Do not repeat key phrases. Come up with new words. Use Thesaurus.
  • Keep all verbs in the same tense.
    • DO NOT SWITCH TENSES!!!
intro paragraph
Intro Paragraph
  • First sentence: General statement related to theme in thesis. (Everyone can relate to)
    • What is our thesis about…
    • Society believes that ignorance equates to bliss, but does that mean that intelligence always equates to happiness. There are no easy routes to happiness.
  • Second and/or third sentence: Another general sentence(s) that narrow the topic down to your thesis. (Relate more to the story.)
intro paragraph cont
Intro Paragraph cont.
  • In the next sentence remember: AGTS
    • Author
    • Genre
    • Title
    • Summarize how Charlie fits with the first two sentences of the intro.
  • In Daniel Keyes’ short story “Flowers for Algernon,” Charlie learns the truth.
  • This leads right into the thesis:
    • His experimental surgery has positives and negatives consequences.
anatomy of the conclusion
Anatomy of the Conclusion:
  • The conclusion begins with a restatement of the thesis, not a repetition, and gradually widens toward a final , broad statement of implication.
  • Borrows from the body paragraphs, without being flatly repetitive or listing points already covered.
  • Creates echoes of the introduction and body paragraphs to reinforce analysis/ ideas.
  • Moves outward with a statement that relates the thesis to a broader implication
slide16

Expand on the implications of your analysis: So what? Why do we care about these ideas? What’s so important about what you’ve developed in your paper?

  • The conclusion need not be longer than four to six sentences, as with the introduction.
conclusion
Conclusion:
  • Start specific, then get general and important.

Introduction

Conclusion

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