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Problem Solving Block. Ten Minute Math Multiplication/Division . 23 X 46=. 846 ÷ 7 =. REVIEW: Data Tables. REVIEW: Geometry. Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders. Measure the heights of a class of First Graders and a class of Fourth Graders OR use the lists below.

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Problem Solving Block

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Problem solving block

Problem Solving Block


Ten minute math multiplication division

Ten Minute Math Multiplication/Division

23 X 46=

846 ÷ 7=


Review data tables

REVIEW: Data Tables


Review geometry

REVIEW: Geometry


Problem solving block

Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders

  • Measure the heights of a class of First Graders and a class of Fourth Graders OR use the lists below.

First Grade

Fourth Grade


Problem solving block

Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders

  • We have collected data on our heights and the heights of a first grade class. In order to try to figure out how much taller a fourth grader is than a first grader, you need to COMPARE the two classes.

  • Today, you are going to make a representation or representations of these two sets of data to help you compare them. What are some ways you might represent these two sets of data so that they are easy to compare?

  • Talk to your group about how you might represent these data sets so that they are easy to compare.

  • Share ideas….


Problem solving block

Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders

  • As you work on your representations, remember that other people (parents, teachers, principal and classmates) will be seeing your representations. Try to make your representations clear so that someone who doesn’t know about our project can understand what your representation shows. So LABEL!!!

  • Think about these questions as you create your representations:

  • Can you easily see the first grade data? The fourth grade data?

  • What features of your representation help someone looking at it compare the two groups?

  • If needed….next slide has sample student work.


Problem solving block

Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders

  • Student Samples


Problem solving block

Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders

  • Technology Extension

  • Introduce Double Bar Graph using http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph

  • Show students how to use the website to put their data in the double bar graph format. Site is user friendly with help to the left of the data entry that explains each data item they need to input.

  • Allow students to work in pairs to create a double bar graph with the data they collected through measuring the two homerooms.

  • Site allows you to color code or pattern code the bars to differentiate the data. Students can print from the website, or email the graph to their teacher.

  • Questions to think about as you work:

  • Can you create a table to match your bar graph data?

  • Were they any outliers in your data?

  • What parts of your graph would change if you separated the data by boy/girl vs. homeroom?

  • How many students were at least 4 ft tall? How many students in both classes were 60 inches tall?

  • How would the data compare if you measured the heights of another grade level?


Problem solving block

Representing the Heights of First and Fourth Graders

  • Independent Work

  • MM p.217-218


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