Session 3 february 1 2011
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Session 3 February 1, 2011. Historical Inquiry Professional Development. Achieving mature historical thought depends precisely on our ability to navigate the uneven landscape of history, to traverse the rugged terrain that lies between the poles of familiarity and distance from the past .

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Historical Inquiry Professional Development

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Session 3 february 1 2011

Session 3

February 1, 2011

Historical Inquiry Professional Development


Historical inquiry professional development

Achieving mature historical thought depends precisely on our ability to navigate the uneven landscape of history, to traverse the rugged terrain that lies between the poles of familiarity and distance from the past.

Sam Wineberg (2001)


Session outline

  • Pair share P. J. Lee’s article – respond to 3 questions.

  • Library:

    Review Wikispace

    Examine Tutorials

    Review and search internet sites for primary sources relevant to your topics

  • Brainstorm ideas/concerns for how to use SCIM-C in one of your classrooms

  • Next session’s outline

Session Outline


Putting principles into practice understanding history peter j lee

How do you deal with students’ preconceptions about history in your classroom?

In what ways can we help students think about their own thinking? (metacognition)

How do you view Lee’s suggestion for how to teach history?

“Putting principles into practice: Understanding History” peter j. Lee


Feedback from web search

  • Tutorial sites:

    • Would you use one of these sites for your own Professional Development?

    • Name one aspect of a site that you find helpful or interesting.

  • US Sites:

    • Have you explored any of these sites and if so, which one(s)?

    • For what purpose did you use the site?

    • How might you use one of these sites with your students?

  • World Sites:

    • Have you explored any of these sites and if so, which one(s)?

    • For what purpose did you use the site?

    • How might you use these sites with your students?

Feedback from web search


Hipd web sources

Tutorials and teaching tips:

  • www.historicalinquiry.com

  • http://historicalthinkingmatters.org

  • http://webinquiry.org

  • http://teachinghistory.org

    United States:

  • http://web.wm.edu/hsi/?svr=www

  • http://docsteach.org

  • http://memory.loc.gov

  • www.archives.gov

  • http://www.besthistorysites.net/ushistory_roaring20s.shtml

HIPD WeB sources


Cont web resources

World:

  • http://www.dhr.history.vt.edu/ (US and European)

  • http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com (World)

  • http://chnm.gmu.edu (Asia)

  • http://spice.stanford.edu/docs/155 (Asia)

  • http://legacy.lclark.edu/~history/HIROSHIMA/gallery.html (Japan)

  • http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/pearl2.htm (Japan)

  • www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/pfhiroshima.htm (Japan)

  • http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/decad163.asp (Israel)

  • http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/apr/04.htm (Russia)

  • http://www.deremilitari.org/resources/crusades.htm (Crusades)

  • http://www.historyteacher.net/APEuroCourse/WebLinks/WebLinks-WorldWar1.htm (European)

  • http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1902lenin.html (Soviet)

Cont. web resources


Historical inquiry professional development

History is a vast and constantly expanding storehouse of information about people and events in the past. For students, learning history leads to encounters with thousands of unfamiliar and distant names, dates, people, places, events and stories. Working with such content is a complex enterprise not easily reduced to choices between learning facts and mastering historical thinking processes. Indeed attention to one is necessary to foster the other.

Robert B. Bain (2005)


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