Chapter 8 opener farmers and nursery workers plant tree seedlings on degraded land in costa rica
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Chapter 8 Opener Farmers and nursery workers plant tree seedlings on degraded land in Costa Rica.

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Chapter 8 opener farmers and nursery workers plant tree seedlings on degraded land in costa rica
Chapter 8OpenerFarmers and nursery workers plant tree seedlings on degraded land in Costa Rica


Figure 8.1For a range of land uses in West Africa, the average number of vertebrate native forest species declines with increasing intensity of human impacts, and the number of open-habitat species increases


Figure 8.2Landscapes vary in the extent to which humans have altered the patterns of species composition and natural vegetation through various activities; ecosystem processes also vary


Figure 8.3Two types of coffee management systems:(A) Shade coffee is grown under a diverse canopy of trees; (B) Sun coffee is grown as a monoculture


Figure 8.4Ecosystem management involves bringing together all of the stakeholders who affect a large ecosystem and receive benefits from it


Figure 8.5(A) Many bird of paradise species are endemic to New Guinea;(B) Payakona and other New Guinea tribesmen use bird of paradise feathers in ceremonial costumes


Figure 8.6Large blocks of indigenous lands are important in the overall conservation strategy for the Brazilian Amazon


Figure 8.7Extractive reserves established in Brazil provide a reason to maintain forests;the trunks of wild rubber trees are cut for their latex


Figure 8.8Patterns of payments for 103 ecosystem services (PES) projects from 37 countries: (A) Number of projects addressing different types of threat; (B) Funding sources for the projects


Figure 8.8Patterns of payments for 103 ecosystem services (PES) projects from 37 countries: (A) Number of projects addressing different types of threat


Figure 8.8Patterns of payments for 103 ecosystem services (PES) projects from 37 countries: (B) Funding sources for the projects


Figure 8.9(A) Trout stream habitat that has been degraded by humanactivities;(B) Trout stream habitat that has been restored


Figure 8.10An experiment to test the effects of different treatments on restoration at the Friendship Marsh in Tijuana Estuary, CA


Figure 8.11Decisions must be made about whether the best course of action is to restore a degraded site completely, partially restore it, replace the original species with different species, or take no action


Figure 8.12(A) In the late 1930s, members of the CCC participated in a U. of Wisconsin project to restorethe wild species of a midwestern prairie; (B) The prairie as it looks today


Figure 8.13(A) The Freshkills landfill on Staten Island while active dumping was still occurring; (B) The future planned restoration of the site, based on an artist’s viewpoint


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