Gas stoichiometry ideal gas law
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Gas Stoichiometry Ideal Gas Law. Putting it all together…. Balance the following equation…. C 8 H 18 (l) + O 2 (g) → CO 2 (g) + H 2 0(g) 2 C 8 H 18 (l) + 25 O 2 (g) → 16 CO 2 (g) + 18 H 2 0(g) Coefficients of balanced equations can be used as mole ratios in stoichiometry problems.

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Gas Stoichiometry Ideal Gas Law

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Gas stoichiometry ideal gas law

Gas Stoichiometry Ideal Gas Law

Putting it all together…


Balance the following equation

Balance the following equation…

  • C8H18(l) + O2(g) → CO2(g) + H20(g)

  • 2 C8H18(l) + 25 O2(g) → 16 CO2(g) + 18 H20(g)

  • Coefficients of balanced equations can be used as mole ratios in stoichiometry problems


  • Mass mass stoichiometry

    Mass-Mass Stoichiometry

    • Problem 11.13 c (p.332)

      • Mg + HCl → H2 + MgCl2

      • 60.1 g HCl


    Volume ratio mole ratio

    Volume Ratio = Mole Ratio

    • Problem 12.85 (p.373)

      • 4 NH3(g) + 5 O2(g) → 4 NO(g) + 6 H2O(g)


    Avogadro s law one mole of a gas will occupy 22 4 l

    Avogadro’s LawOne mole of a gas will occupy 22.4 L

    • This means that the mole ratio is the same as the volume ratio


    Volume ratio mole ratio1

    Volume Ratio = Mole Ratio

    • Problem 12.85 (p.373)

      • 4 NH3(g) + 5 O2(g) → 4 NO(g) + 6 H2O(g)

      • 200. L O2


    Volume ratio mole ratio2

    Volume Ratio = Mole Ratio

    • Problem 12.85 (p.373)

      • 4 NH3(g) + 5 O2(g) → 4 NO(g) + 6 H2O(g)

    • Problem 12.81 (p.373)

      • 2 C2H2(g) + 5 O2(g) → 4 CO2(g) + 2H2O(g)

      • 2.5 tanks O2


    Gas @ stp

    Gas @ STP

    • Problem 12.92 (p374)

      • NaN3(s) + Fe2O3(s) → Na2O(s) + Fe(s) + N2(g)

      • 6 NaN3(s) + Fe2O3(s) → 3 Na2O(s) + 2 Fe(s) + 9 N2(g)

      • 10.6 g NaN3


    Standard molar volume

    Standard Molar Volume

    • The volume of 1.0 mole of any gas at STP is 22.4 L.

      • This is called the standard molar volume.

    • The volume of any gas at STP can be calculated if the number of moles is known:

    • V = (moles)(22.4 L)


    Gas not at stp

    Gas Not at STP

    • Problem 12.88 (p.373)

      • CaC2(s) + 2 H2O(l) → Ca(OH)2(s) + C2H2(g)


    Ideal gas law

    Ideal Gas Law

    • All of the variables used to describe gases can be compared using the Ideal Gas Law

    • The IGL is often called an equation of state, as it is very useful when finding some property of a gas at a certain condition

      • Not so great when conditions are changing

      • Entropy is another condition of state


    Ideal gas law1

    Ideal Gas Law

    • PV = nRT

    • P = pressure

    • V = volume

    • T = temperature

    • n = number of moles of gas

    • R = Gas Constant

      • value depends on the desired unit


    Gas constant r

    Gas Constant (“R”)

    • R is a constant that is used in the IGL so that it may be used for all gases

    • It has a different value, depending on the pressure unit being used in the problem


    Gas not at stp1

    Gas Not at STP

    • Problem 12.88 (p.373)

      • CaC2(s) + 2 H2O(l) → Ca(OH)2(s) + C2H2(g)

      • 960 ml C2H2

    • Problem 12.90 (p.373)

      • 2 C8H18(l) + 25 O2(g) → 16 CO2(g) + 18 H20(g)


    Gas not at stp2

    Gas Not at STP

    • Problem 12.88 (p.373)

      • CaC2(s) + 2 H2O(l) → Ca(OH)2(s) + C2H2(g)

      • 960 ml C2H2

    • Problem 12.90 (p.373)

      • 2 C8H18(l) + 25 O2(g) → 16 CO2(g) + 18 H20(g)

      • 837 L CO2


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