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Supporting Details PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Chapter 4 (continued). Supporting Details. Supporting details consist of the additional information the author provides so readers can understand the main idea completely . The function of details is to support (explain, illustrate, prove) the information in the main idea sentence.

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Chapter 4 (continued)

Supporting Details

Supporting details consist of the additional information the author provides so readers can understand the main idea completely. The function of details is to support (explain, illustrate, prove) the information in the main idea sentence.


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Details consists of specific information

such as examples, explanations,

descriptions, proof, and statistics.

Note thatexamplesare always details.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Locating the Supporting Details

Turn the main idea sentence into one or more questions by using who, what, when, where, and why. The supporting details will answer the questions you create.

Example

Main idea: “There are three types of plagiarism.”

Question: What are the three types of plagiarism?

Supporting details:

• global plagiarism--”lifting” a whole work and acting as if you wrote it

• patchwork-- ”stitching” together pieces from various sources

• incremental--not giving proper credit for quotes or paraphrases

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Other Clues to Identifying Supporting Details

There are other clues that can help you identify

supporting details:

Clue #1: Details often appear in a bulleted, numbered, or lettered list.

Clue #2: After the first detail, other details are introduced by words and phrases such as In addition, also, moreover, another, next, then, last, finally, etc.

Clue #3: The main idea sentence itself often gives you a clue about the number or type of supporting details. Watch for clues such as four reasons, two kinds, six types, certain ways, three categories, etc.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Clue #1 Details often appear in a bulleted, numbered, or lettered list.

For example, you might see this paragraph in a textbook.

(The sample paragraph is repeated in various formats ; the clues are underlined.)

There are three types of information.

• There are facts, which consist of information that can be

verified or proved.

• There are opinions, which cannot be proved or disproved.

• There is incorrect information, which can be disproved.

There are three types of information.

1. There are facts, which consist of information that can be

verified or proved.

2. There are opinions, which cannot be proved or disproved.

3. There is incorrect information, which can be disproved.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Examples (continued):

There are three types of information. First, there are facts, which consist of information that can be verified or proved. Second, there are opinions, which cannot be proved or disproved. Third, there is incorrect information, which can be disproved.

There are three types of information. (A) There are facts, which consist of information that can be verified or proved. (B) There are opinions, which cannot be proved or disproved. (C) There is incorrect information, which can be disproved.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Clue #2 After the first detail, other details are introduced by words and phrases such as In addition, also, moreover, another, next, then, last, finally, etc.

There are three types of information. There are facts, which consist of information that can be verified or proved. In addition, there are opinions, which cannot be proved or disproved. Also, there is incorrect information, which can be disproved.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Clue#3 The main idea sentence itself often gives you a clue about the number or type of supporting details. Watch for clues such as four reasons, two kinds, six types, certain ways, three categories, etc.

There are three types of information. First, there are facts, which consist of information that can be verified or proved. In addition, there are opinions, which cannot be proved or disproved (proved incorrect). Also, there is incorrect information, which can be disproved.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Major and Minor Details

Major (primary) details support or explain the main idea directly. They are usually essential to understanding the main idea.

Minor (secondary) details support or explain other details.

All details, of course, directly or indirectly support the main idea.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Cadence for Supporting Details

Details are the info authors supply

So you’ll understand the big “MI.”

Details prove, explain, or illustrate

What the main idea states.

Details are like supporting walls:

Without ‘em the main idea “roof” falls.

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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Main Idea and Supporting Details “House”

Main Idea

Supporting Details

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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The Edge: Pointers from the Coach

  • Main ideas are general; details are specific.

  • Examples are always details.

  • Number the details in textbook paragraphs; do not underline or highlight them. (You’ll mark everything!)

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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The Edge (continued)

  • When you take notes from your

    textbooks on separate paper,

    --list the details on separate lines.

    --shorten or paraphrase the details.

    (Both of these will make it easier for you to learn and

    remember the material.)

Chapter 4: Supporting Details


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