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POWER. Summary of the P revention O ptions for W omen E quals R ights Project Sheana Bull Tom Evans Samuel Posner Charlene Ortiz Jana Sczersputowski Sherri Varnell Stephanie Phibbs Lili Whittaker Lillian Lin Brenda Beaty Lee Sherman James Ortiz.

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Power

POWER

Summary of the

PreventionOptions forWomenEqualsRights

Project

Sheana Bull Tom Evans Samuel Posner

Charlene Ortiz Jana Sczersputowski Sherri Varnell

Stephanie Phibbs Lili Whittaker Lillian Lin

Brenda Beaty Lee Sherman

James Ortiz


Power summary
POWER Summary

  • POWER tests the efficacy of a condom social marketing campaign to increase knowledge of, improve attitudes towards and increase use of female as well as male condoms for women aged 15-25 (primarily African American and Latina)


Power summary1
POWER Summary

  • We have a pre post design in 12 neighborhoods in four cities; six neighborhoods were randomly selected to implement the campaign.

  • We completed cross-sectional baseline data collection in all 12 neighborhoods in 2004.

  • The campaign ran in six communities starting in October 2004 and continuing through April 2005


Power sampling
POWER sampling

  • We used a time-space sampling approach, one that yields a probability sample.

    • For data collection, we identified 363 likely places to find and intercept 15-25 year old African American and Latina women across all neighborhoods; we generated 622 unique Venue-Day-Time increments (VDT)

    • We randomly selected VDTs and attended those venues at that time to recruit and enroll women in the data collection efforts.


Power field staff
POWER field staff

Lived in study neighborhoods

Baseline: 46 Follow-up: 32

Diverse: age, gender, ethnicity

Referrals from community ‘Gatekeepers’

Referrals from staff

Walking the Talk!


Baseline findings
Baseline findings

  • Recruitment:

    • “Clicked” 16,478 women

    • Approached 10,136 women

    • 6122 (60%) agreed to complete eligibility screener

    • 4032 were eligible; 3437 (85%) completed a survey; 3407 were useable




Follow up findings
Follow-up findings

  • Recruitment:

    • 12,183 women “clicked”

    • 6682 approached (55% of those clicked)

    • 4228 screened (64% of those approached)

    • 3290 eligible (70% of those screened)

    • 3036 agreed to survey

      • 3130 completed a survey; 3007 were useable



Primary outcomes
Primary outcomes

  • We saw no neighborhood effects--there were no differences in awareness, attitudes or use of male and female condoms between women in campaign neighborhoods and comparison

  • There was no change in awareness, attitudes and use from baseline to follow-up across neighborhoods



Awareness of female condoms
Awareness of Female Condoms

  • Women who had seen our posters had more frequently seen and read information on female condoms


Awareness of male condoms
Awareness of Male Condoms

  • Women who had seen our postershad more frequently read information on male condoms--no differences observed in having seen male condoms

*

*differences not significant


Use of female condoms
Use of Female Condoms

  • More women seeing our posters had ever used a Female Condom and more had used one the last time they had sex


Use of male condoms
Use of Male Condoms

  • More women seeing our posters had ever used a Male Condom and more had used one the last time they had sex




Additional findings
Additional findings

  • Although a larger proportion of women in campaign neighborhoods saw the campaign than women in comparison neighborhoods (14% vs. 9%), we believe many women from comparison neighborhoods were exposed to the campaign


Making sense of it all
Making sense of it all

  • Campaign appears to work at the individual but not the neighborhood level

    • Increase campaign coverage to get saturation?

    • What other secular trends are occurring?

  • So what now?

    • Dissemination?

    • Further Research?


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