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POWER. Summary of the P revention O ptions for W omen E quals R ights Project Sheana BullTom EvansSamuel Posner Charlene OrtizJana SczersputowskiSherri Varnell Stephanie Phibbs Lili WhittakerLillian Lin Brenda Beaty Lee Sherman James Ortiz.

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POWER

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POWER

Summary of the

PreventionOptions forWomenEqualsRights

Project

Sheana BullTom EvansSamuel Posner

Charlene OrtizJana SczersputowskiSherri Varnell

Stephanie Phibbs Lili WhittakerLillian Lin

Brenda Beaty Lee Sherman

James Ortiz


POWER Summary

  • POWER tests the efficacy of a condom social marketing campaign to increase knowledge of, improve attitudes towards and increase use of female as well as male condoms for women aged 15-25 (primarily African American and Latina)


POWER Summary

  • We have a pre post design in 12 neighborhoods in four cities; six neighborhoods were randomly selected to implement the campaign.

  • We completed cross-sectional baseline data collection in all 12 neighborhoods in 2004.

  • The campaign ran in six communities starting in October 2004 and continuing through April 2005


POWER sampling

  • We used a time-space sampling approach, one that yields a probability sample.

    • For data collection, we identified 363 likely places to find and intercept 15-25 year old African American and Latina women across all neighborhoods; we generated 622 unique Venue-Day-Time increments (VDT)

    • We randomly selected VDTs and attended those venues at that time to recruit and enroll women in the data collection efforts.


POWER field staff

Lived in study neighborhoods

Baseline: 46Follow-up: 32

Diverse: age, gender, ethnicity

Referrals from community ‘Gatekeepers’

Referrals from staff

Walking the Talk!


Baseline findings

  • Recruitment:

    • “Clicked” 16,478 women

    • Approached 10,136 women

    • 6122 (60%) agreed to complete eligibility screener

    • 4032 were eligible; 3437 (85%) completed a survey; 3407 were useable


Baseline Demographics


Campaign Activities


Follow-up findings

  • Recruitment:

    • 12,183 women “clicked”

    • 6682 approached (55% of those clicked)

    • 4228 screened (64% of those approached)

    • 3290 eligible (70% of those screened)

    • 3036 agreed to survey

      • 3130 completed a survey; 3007 were useable


Follow-up demographics


Primary outcomes

  • We saw no neighborhood effects--there were no differences in awareness, attitudes or use of male and female condoms between women in campaign neighborhoods and comparison

  • There was no change in awareness, attitudes and use from baseline to follow-up across neighborhoods


Exposure to Campaign


Awareness of Female Condoms

  • Women who had seen our posters had more frequently seen and read information on female condoms


Awareness of Male Condoms

  • Women who had seen our postershad more frequently read information on male condoms--no differences observed in having seen male condoms

*

*differences not significant


Use of Female Condoms

  • More women seeing our posters had ever used a Female Condom and more had used one the last time they had sex


Use of Male Condoms

  • More women seeing our posters had ever used a Male Condom and more had used one the last time they had sex


Use of Condoms Last Sex


POWER exposure and outcomes


Additional findings

  • Although a larger proportion of women in campaign neighborhoods saw the campaign than women in comparison neighborhoods (14% vs. 9%), we believe many women from comparison neighborhoods were exposed to the campaign


Making sense of it all

  • Campaign appears to work at the individual but not the neighborhood level

    • Increase campaign coverage to get saturation?

    • What other secular trends are occurring?

  • So what now?

    • Dissemination?

    • Further Research?


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