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Nancy Arnold, Washington Ron Cammaert, Riverside Publishing Dan Wiener, Massachusetts Ed Roeber, Measured Progress Rachel Quenemoen, NCEO. What the heck does proficiency mean for students with significant cognitive disabilities?.

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what the heck does proficiency mean for students with significant cognitive disabilities
Nancy Arnold, Washington

Ron Cammaert, Riverside Publishing

Dan Wiener, Massachusetts

Ed Roeber, Measured Progress

Rachel Quenemoen, NCEO

What the heck does proficiency mean for students with significant cognitive disabilities?
slide2

“…would allow States to use a documented and validated standards-setting process to define academic achievement standards for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities, as defined in proposed Sec. 200.1(d)(2), who take an alternate assessment.”

March 20, 2003 NPRM for Title I

slide3

Many states have completed a careful standards-setting process for their alternate assessment, just as they have done for their general assessments – these efforts are needed to produce alternate achievement standards

Examples shown in NCEO reports (see Synthesis Reports 42, 47, 48, plus one more on its way)

slide4
“These [alternate achievement] standards must be aligned with the State\'s academic content standards and reflect professional judgment of the highest learning standards possible for those students.”

March 20, 2003 NPRM for Title I

slide5

WHO are the students who participate in alternate assessment aligned to alternate achievement standards?

slide6

What do we measure? What does good learning look like for this small group of children? What is “achievement?”

a brief history of educational goals for these students
Developmental approaches

Functional approaches

Academic approaches – access to the general curriculum, standards-based content, grade level contexts

* Diane Browder, 2001

A brief history of educational goals for these students
development of alternate assessments quenemoen rigney thurlow 2002
1.     Careful stakeholder and policymaker development of desired student outcomes for the population, reflecting the best understanding of research and practice, thoughtfully aligned to same content expected for all students.

2.     Careful development, testing, and refinement of assessment methods.

3.     Scoring of evidence of content aligned student work, according to professionally accepted standards, against criteria that reflect best understanding from research and practice.

4.     Standard-setting process to allow use of results in reporting and accountability systems.

5.     Continuous improvement of the assessment process.

Development of Alternate AssessmentsQuenemoen, Rigney, & Thurlow, 2002
slide9

Alternate Assessments are works in progress

  • Alignment to content standards varies:
  • Reading and math skills in context of grade level curriculum contexts
  • Reading and math skills in functional contexts
  • Reading and math skills in isolation
  • Weak linkages to reading and math

All of these exist within current state approaches

slide10

Alternate Assessment Strategies

Thompson & Thurlow, 2001

IEP Analysis

Performance event

Combination

Checklist

Evidence/Portfolio

[2 states undecided]

case studies common criteria quenemoen thompson thurlow 2003
1. Content Standards Linkage.

2. Independence.

3. Generalization.

4. Appropriateness.

5. IEP Linkage.

6. Performance.level of skill or mastery and multiple settings; progress and appropriateness; accuracy, mastery, progress, independence, multiple settings, multiple occasions, or multiple purpose.

Case Studies: Common CriteriaQuenemoen, Thompson, & Thurlow, 2003
slide12

Validity of Alternate Assessments*

Face Validity – Are scoring procedures consistent with

important best practice indicators in the lives of

students with significant disabilities?

Concurrent Validity – Do scores correlate with other

measures of students achievement and indices

of quality programming at the school level?

Predictive Validity – How well do scores predict

post-school success?

*Concepts developed by Harold Kleinert, U of KY

development of alternate assessments quenemoen rigney thurlow 200213
1.     Careful stakeholder and policymaker development of desired student outcomes for the population, reflecting the best understanding of research and practice, thoughtfully aligned to same content expected for all students.

2.     Careful development, testing, and refinement of assessment methods.

3.     Scoring of evidence of content aligned student work, according to professionally accepted standards, against criteria that reflect best understanding from research and practice.

4.     Standard-setting process to allow use of results in reporting and accountability systems.

5.     Continuous improvement of the assessment process.

Development of Alternate AssessmentsQuenemoen, Rigney, & Thurlow, 2002
slide14

Copies of the papers cited and presented are at:

http://education.umn.edu/nceo

or Search for NCEO

Alternate Assessment Topic, Resources

slide15

What (the Heck) Does “Proficient” Mean?

Standard Setting on the

WAAS

Nancy Arnold

Washington Department of Public Instruction

CCSSO - San Antonio, TX

June 2003

steps taken to determine standard setting process
Review of NCEO Synthesis Reports

Detailed Study of Standard Setting for Alternate Assessment in Other States

Review of Relevant Literature

Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (AERA, APA, NCME)

Setting Performance Standards: Concepts, Methods, and Perspectives (Cizek)

Validation of Process with National Technical AdvisoryCommittee and Advisory Panel

Steps Taken to Determine Standard Setting Process
standard setting methodology
Selection of panelists

Teachers, parents and administrators

Stratified sample

Portfolio experts and novices

Selection of standard setting materials

Performance descriptors

Scoring patterns

Exemplar portfolios

Orientation and training of panelists

Standard Setting Methodology
standard setting methodology continued
Determining alternate achievement performance descriptors

Set cut scores in three rounds

using scoring patterns

revise cut scores using exemplar portfolios

finalize cut scores using impact data

Evaluate standard setting process

Standard Setting Methodology (continued)
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