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Minnesota Manual of Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Training Guide

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2007- 2008. Minnesota Manual of Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Training Guide. Goals of the Workshop. Outline the steps in making decisions about accommodations for instruction and assessment

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2007-2008

Minnesota Manual of Accommodationsfor Students with Disabilities

Training Guide

goals of the workshop
Goals of the Workshop
  • Outline the steps in making decisions about accommodations for instruction and assessment
  • Identify key differences between instructional accommodations and assessment accommodations.
  • Locate and become familiar with Minnesota’s policies about accommodations in the Procedures Manual for the Minnesota Assessments
  • Become comfortable using the training activities and fact sheets included in the manual
introductions
Introductions
  • Tell a little about yourself—your name, your position in your district

2. What’s one thing you hope to learn about accommodations today?

3. What’s one thing you like about Minnesota?

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2007-2008

Minnesota Manual of Accommodationsfor Students with Disabilities

Training Guide

five steps guiding accommodation decisions
Five steps guiding accommodation decisions:
  • Expect students with disabilities to achieve grade-level academic content standards.
  • Learn about accommodations for instruction.
  • Make decisions about accommodations for assessment.
  • Administer accommodations during instruction and assessment.
  • Evaluate and improve accommodation use.
equal inclusion in grade level content
Equal Inclusion in Grade Level Content

STEP

1

  • Every IEP team member familiar with MN academic standards and accountability systems at state and district level.
  • Every IEP team member knows where to locate MN academic standards and updates.
  • Collaboration between general and special educators must occur for successful student access to grade level content.
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Conditions for High Expectations

STEP

1

Teachers qualified to teach content areas and who know how to differentiate instruction for diverse learners

IEPs that provide specialized instruction (e.g., reading strategies, study skills)

Accommodations which increase access to instruction and assessment

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STEP

1

Participation of students with disabilities in assessments is required by federal laws:

  • No Child Left Behind (NCLB)
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA)

Legal Basis

include all students with disabilities in state accountability assessments
Include all students with disabilities in state accountability assessments

STEP

1

  • Assure the provision of accommodations to facilitate student access to grade-level instruction and state assessments

(MCA-IIs, GRAD, TEAE included for ELLs with Disabilities, etc.)

  • Use of alternate assessments to assess the achievement of students with the most significant cognitive disabilities

(MTAS in reading and math)

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STEP

2

What are accommodations?

Accommodations are practices or procedures that provide inclusion in content. They do not reduce learning expectations.

(Modifications will be addressed later in this step)

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Figure 1: The use of accommodations is linked through each of these areas:

STEP

2

Classroom

Instruction

State and District Assessments

Classroom

Assessments

Content Standards

Figure from ASES SCASS/CCSSO Accommodations Training Slides Powerpoint

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STEP

2

IEP teams and for students who are also English language learners (ELLs), bilingual or ESL staff

Who is involved in decisions?

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Accommodation Categories

STEP

2

Presentation - students may access to information in alternate modes.

Response - students may complete work in different ways

Timing and Scheduling - students have flexibility in how time is organized to complete work

Setting - students may have changes to setting or conditions

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STEP

2

Accommodations vs.Modifications

Accommodations provide access without reducing learning expectations

Modifications can increase the achievement gap by lowering expectations for what students are expected to know or do.

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STEP

2

  • Student characteristics

2. Instructional tasks expected of students to demonstrate grade level content in state standards

3. Consistency with standards-based IEP for classroom instruction and assessments

IEP Team Considerations

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STEP

2

Consideration 1: Student Characteristics

Questions to ask:

  • What student characteristics may require accommodations to access academic content?
  • 2. Does the student have an accommodation preference?
  • 3. Has the student advocated for a specific accommodation?
  • 4. Have parents or guardians had input into accommodations used?
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STEP

2

Inclusion Needs That May Require Accommodations (Tools 2.1)

1. What student characteristics may require accommodations to be included in classroom content?

Tools to Use

for english language learners with disabilities consider
For English Language Learners with Disabilities Consider:

STEP

2

  • Current English proficiency level
  • Annual Review of progress toward English proficiency
  • Experience and length of time in U.S. schools
  • Level and type of instruction in primary language
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STEP

2

Accommodations From the Student’s Perspective (Tool 2.2)

Accommodations Journal (Tool 2.3)

2. Does the student have an accommodation preference?

3. Has he or she advocated for a specific accommodation?

Tools to Use

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STEP

2

Parent Input on Accommodations (Tool 2.4)

4. Have parents or guardians had input into accommodations used?

Tools to Use

activity 2b inclusion needs that may require accommodations
Activity 2B Inclusion Needs That May Require Accommodations
  • Do Tool 2.1 Questions independently
  • Choose accommodation category to focus on for your student
  • Go to area of room for your category and pair up to do discussion questions for 2B.
  • Return and fill in the chart on the back of 2B with your table groups.
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STEP

2

Consideration 2: Classroom tasks Consideration 3: Consistency with IEP

Questions to guide accommodations selection for instruction:

5. Is the accommodations being used in class noted in the student’s IEP?

6. What barriers have needed to be removed in classroom instruction?

7. Has the student needed or shown facility for using an accommodation for class work or classroom tests?

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STEP

2

Accommodation Use in the Classroom (Tool 2.5)

Evaluating Accommodation Use in the Classroom (Tool 2.6)

For questions 5-7 refer to the following tools:

Tools to Use

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STEP 3:

Making decisions about assessment accommodations

accommodations and modifications on assessments
Accommodations and Modifications on Assessments

STEP

3

  • Accommodations do not change what is being measured on a test.
  • Modifications do change what is being measured.
slide35

STEP

3

  • Student characteristics
  • Individual test characteristics
  • Accommodation policies and maintaining validity

IEP Team Considerations

consideration 1 student characteristics
Consideration 1: Student Characteristics

STEP

3

  • What student characteristics may require accommodations to access a state or district test?
  • What feedback has the student given after using accommodations on tests previously?
  • Has the student advocated for a particular accommodation on an assessment?

Questions to ask:

1 what student characteristics may require accommodations to access a state or district test
1. What student characteristics may require accommodations to access a state or district test?

STEP

3

Refer to Tool 2.1

2. What feedback has the student given after using accommodations on state tests previously?

After Test Accommodation Questions (Tool 3.1)

Tools to Use

Tools to Use

slide38

STEP

3

3. Has he or she advocated for a

particular accommodation on an

assessment?

Assessment Accommodations Agreement (Tool 3.2)

Tools to Use

slide39

Consideration 2: Test Characteristics

STEP

3

  • Questions to ask:
  • What are the characteristics of the test my student needs to take? Are the test tasks the same as classroom assessment tasks in what they are designed to measure?
  • Does the student use an accommodation for a classroom task that is allowed for similar tasks on the state or district level tests?
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STEP

3

Consideration 2: Test Characteristics

Questions to ask: (continued)

3. Are there other barriers that could be removed by using an accommodation that is not already offered or used by the student?

4. Are there additional principles to help guide decision-making?

1 what are the characteristics of the state test
1. What are the characteristics of the state test?

STEP

3

Tools to Use

Minnesota Test Characteristics (Tool 3.3)

2. Does student use an accommodation for a classroom task that is allowed for similar tasks on the state or district level tests?

Refer to Tool 2.2

Tools to Use

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STEP

3

3. Are there other barriers that could be removed by using an accommodation that is not already offered or used by the student?

Refer to Tool 3.2

Tools to Use

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Consideration 3: Maintaining Validity

STEP

3

  • Questions to ask:
  • Does the state or district allow the identified accommodation for the test or portion of the test noted as a barrier?
  • If not, does the accommodation change the standard of the assessment?
  • Are there additional principles to help guide decision-making?
slide44

STEP

3

  • Does the state or district allow the identified accommodation for the test or portion of the test as noted as a barrier?
  • If not, does the accommodation change standard of the assessment?

See Procedures Manual, test specification documents and refer to Tool 3.3

Tools to Use

slide45

STEP

3

3. Are there additional principles to help guide decision-making?

Do’s and Don’ts When Selecting Accommodations

(Tool 3.4)

Tools to Use

slide49

STEP 4:

Administering accommodations during instruction and assessment

examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for instruction
Examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for instruction.

STEP

4

  • Accommodations chosen in instruction are very different from what is allowed on assessments.
  • Accommodation choices are made that will provide the most seamless experience between instruction and assessment.
examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for instruction51
Examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for instruction.

STEP

4

  • Accommodations chosen in instruction are very different from what is allowed on assessments.
  • Accommodation choices are made that will provide the most seamless experience between instruction and assessment.
more appropriate and inappropriate practices
More appropriate and inappropriate practices...

STEP

4

  • School level personnel are not aware of the accommodation needs of students in instruction.
  • School level personnel track students’ ongoing accommodation use to best ensure their needs for accommodations on assessment days are met.*
more appropriate and inappropriate practices53
More appropriate and inappropriate practices...

STEP

4

  • School level personnel are not aware of the accommodation needs of students in instruction.
  • School level personnel track students’ ongoing accommodation use to best ensure their needs for accommodations on assessment days are met.*
examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for assessment
Examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for Assessment

STEP

4

  • Develop instructional objectives based on the academic standards.
  • Prepare instructional objectives or study guides based on specific Minnesota test items and teach accordingly.
examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for assessment55
Examples of appropriate and inappropriate practices for Assessment

STEP

4

  • Develop instructional objectives based on the academic standards.
  • Prepare instructional objectives or study guides based on specific Minnesota test items and teach accordingly.
more appropriate and inappropriate practices56
More appropriate and inappropriate practices...

STEP

4

  • Encourage IEP teams to base assessment decisions on what is typically used for students with similar characteristics.
  • Base assessment decisions on individual student needs.
more appropriate and inappropriate practices57
More appropriate and inappropriate practices...

STEP

4

  • Encourage IEP teams to base assessment decisions on what is typically used for students with similar characteristics.
  • Base assessment decisions on individual student needs.
examples of ethical and unethical accommodation practices during the assessment
Examples of ethical and unethical accommodation practices during the assessment

STEP

4

  • Follow state guidelines on appropriate accommodations that maintain test validity for specific tests.
  • Allow the use of notes or other materials that give students an edge in answering items.
examples of ethical and unethical accommodation practices during the assessment59
Examples of ethical and unethical accommodation practices during the assessment

STEP

4

  • Follow state guidelines on appropriate accommodations that maintain test validity for specific tests.
  • Allow the use of notes or other materials that give students an edge in answering items.
slide60

STEP

4

Other information

For all other information on ethical test administration, test security, general security of accommodated materials and non-disclosure agreements…

Please see theProcedure Manual for Minnesota’s Assessments

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STEP

4

Need to map out logistics

  • Teachers and other IEP team members are often given the responsibility for arranging, coordinating, and providing assessment accommodations
  • Prepare for implementation prior to, on, and after day of assessment.

See Tool 4.1

Tools to Use

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STEP 5:

Evaluate and improve accommodations use

reasons why
Reasons why...

STEP

5

  • Ensure meaningful participation
  • Reveal questionable patterns of use
  • Support continued use
  • Indicate additional training needs
  • Guide formative evaluation
ways to collect information
Ways to collect information

STEP

5

  • From classroom data
  • Observations of test administration
  • Interviews with test administrators
  • Talking with students after testing
  • And more...
example questions to ask
Example questions to ask:

STEP

5

Are there procedures in place to ensure test administration procedures are not compromised in providing accommodations?

How well do students with certain accommodations perform?

slide67

STEP

5

Chart in Step 5 in Manual has additional questions with relevant tools already introduced

Staff may want to investigate other sources for evaluating similar questions about accommodations use at the local level

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