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WATER QUALITY PRESENTATION PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE WATER AFFAIRS AND FORESTRY local government perspective BY WILLIAM MORAKA. Structure of the presentation. Water Chain in South Africa Benchmarking Results Study LG Challenges Recommendations. WHERE DOES WQ START. 1 st Tier

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WATER QUALITY PRESENTATION PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE WATER AFFAIRS AND FORESTRY local government perspective BYWILLIAM MORAKA


Structure of the presentation
Structure of the presentation

  • Water Chain in South Africa

  • Benchmarking Results Study

  • LG Challenges

  • Recommendations


WHERE DOES WQ START

1st Tier

National security of supply

2nd Tier

Regional supply to WSA’s

3rd Tier

Local service delivery and customer management

SOURCE

BULK

CRITICAL POINT

(Safe Drinking Water)

DISTRIBUTION

CONSUMER


ZIMBABWE

MOZAMBIQUE

2.

Provincial

BOTSWANA

1.

Boundaries

Water Management

4.

Area Boundaries

3.

5.

Pretoria

WATER MANAGEMENT AREA

Johannesburg

10.

NAMIBIA

1.

LIMPOPO

2.

LUVUVHU AND LETABA

8.

9.

6.

3.

CROCODILE (WEST) AND

MARICO

4.

OLIFANTS

7.

5.

INKOMATI

6.

USUTHU TO MHLATUZE

Bloemfontein

7.

THUKELA

13.

14.

Durban

11.

8.

UPPER VAAL

9.

MIDDLE VAAL

10.

LOWER VAAL

11.

MVOTI TO UMZIMKULU

12.

MZIMVUBU TO KEISKAMMA

17.

12.

13.

UPPER ORANGE

14.

LOWER ORANGE

15.

15.

FISH TO TSITSIKAMMA

16.

East London

GOURITZ

19.

16.

17.

OLIFANTS/DOORN

18.

BREEDE

Cape

Port Elizabeth

18.

19.

BERG

Town

WRM: CMA’s


Returns

79%

Drinking Water Quality

Reliability

1.6

Monitoring programme in place

18

16

Yes

14

No

No data

12

10

8

6

4

2

0

Metro

District

Local

Totals


Returns

63%

Reliability

2.1


Returns

58%

No license

24



CHALLENGES FACED BY LOCAL GOVERNMENT

  • Spillages onto the river systems

  • Competing demands for water – domestic, environmental and industrial

  • Water and wastewater treatment

  • Meeting National drinking water quality standard – SANS 241

  • National wastewater discharge quality standard – DWAF General Authorisation (General Wastewater Limits)


CHALLENGES FACED BY LOCAL GOVERNMENT

  • WSAs often not aware of necessary requirement to set up an effective Drinking Water Quality Management Programme (DWQMP)

  • Management and monitoring of drinking water and wastewater services often inadequate

  • Infrastructure is poorly maintained

  • WSAs may be hindered by institutional capacity problems – insufficient and untrained staff, budgetary constraints


CHALLENGES FACED BY LOCAL GOVERNMENT

  • WSAs often not aware of necessary requirement to set up an effective Drinking Water Quality Management Programme (DWQMP)

  • Management and monitoring of drinking water and wastewater services often inadequate

  • Infrastructure is poorly maintained

  • WSAs may be hindered by institutional capacity problems – insufficient and untrained staff, budgetary constraints


CHALLENGES FACED BY LOCAL GOVERNMENT

  • WSAs often not aware of necessary requirement to set up an effective Drinking Water Quality Management Programme (DWQMP)

  • Management and monitoring of drinking water and wastewater services often inadequate

  • Infrastructure is poorly maintained

  • WSAs may be hindered by institutional capacity problems – insufficient and untrained staff, budgetary constraints


CHALLENGES FACED BY LOCAL GOVERNMENT

  • Several WWTW’s are approaching or have reached capacity

  • Housing developments in certain areas are outpacing the ability to provide adequate treatment capacity

  • Equipment is ageing and some needs to be replaced

  • Risk of asset stripping through sustained inadequate capital funding


CHALLENGES FACED BY LOCAL GOVERNMENT cont.

  • Appropriate interventions not in place to deal with poor drinking water quality

  • Urban (surface water) vs Rural (groundwater)


RESOURCES NEEDED MEET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REQUIREMENTS

  • Require accredited laboratory facilities

  • Require appropriately qualified staff

  • Require appropriate number of staff

  • Require a supply of laboratory consumables


RESOURCES MEET DRINKING WATER QUALITY REQUIREMENTS

  • Various sources of funding can be leveraged:

    • WSA Internal funding

    • SMIF funding

    • Masibambane

    • CBG

    • Equitable share

    • Donor funding


HOW TO IMPROVE ACCEPTABLE DRINKING WATER QUALITY?

  • Commitment to drinking water quality management and multi-stakeholder involvement

  • System analysis and management

  • Support programmes (Awareness and training; Community involvement and awareness; and documentation and reporting)

  • Review and audit (data evaluation and drinking water quality audits)


PRACTICAL PROGRAMMES

  • Free State Dept. of Local Govt. & Housing programme:

    • Run by CSIR

    • Water and treated wastewater sampling and analysis monthly

    • Enables identification of problems and highlights service delivery improvements


SALGA INITIATIVES

  • NATIONAL BENCHMARKING INITATIVE (SALGA, DWAF AND WRC)

  • WATER SERVICES PROVIDER NETWORK

  • PARTNERING WITH SAAWU



RECOMMENDATIONS

  • SHORT-TERM:

    • Metros to assist the WSAs in WQM

    • Waste Water Management

    • Training of operators at Water and Treatment works level

    • Highlight the lack of funding in drinking water quality with the premiers Office

    • Awareness creation and communication of responsibilities for urgent cases


RECOMMENDATIONS

  • MEDIUM-TERM:

    • Implementation of drinking water situational assessments

    • Initiation of provincial drinking water quality consultative audits

    • Conduct an audit of Accredited laboratories in the Country

    • Private Sector involvement


RECOMMENDATIONS

  • LONGER-TERM:

    • WSAs undertake drinking water quality compliance monitoring Programmes assisted by DWAF

    • Benchmarking Process to assess the quality of the data on Drinking Water Quality

    • Frequency of consultative audits decreases as conformance improves

    • Where there is still lack of adherence to monitoring requirements, then the DWAF intervenes



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