Sound devices pattern and rhyme l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 18

Sound Devices / Pattern and Rhyme PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 405 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Sound Devices / Pattern and Rhyme. “Poetry is Music to My Ears!”. Basic Information.

Download Presentation

Sound Devices / Pattern and Rhyme

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Sound devices pattern and rhyme l.jpg

Sound Devices / Pattern and Rhyme

“Poetry is Music to My Ears!”


Basic information l.jpg

Basic Information

  • 0601.8.13 Identify sound patterns (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme, accent, rhyme, repetition), figurative language (e.g., metaphor, simile, hyperbole, personification), and other conventions of verse (e.g., limerick, lyric, narrative, haiku) in poetry.

  • 0701.8.13 Identify sound devices (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme), figurative language (e.g., metaphor, simile), and other conventions of verse in poetry (e.g., limerick, lyric, narrative, haiku) and explain how these contribute to the poem’s meaning and to the poem’s effect.

  • 0801.8.14 Identify sound devices (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme, assonance, internal rhyme, slant rhyme, repetition) and figurative language (e.g., metaphor, simile), and other conventions of verse in poetry (e.g., limerick, lyric, narrative, haiku) and explain how these contribute to the poem’s meaning and to the poem’s effect.


Rhyme l.jpg

Rhyme

Exact repetition of sounds in words at the ends of lines.

  • Little Jack Horner

  • Sat in a corner

    - Eating his Christmas pie.


Internal rhyme l.jpg

Internal Rhyme

Rhyme that occurs within a line of verse

the grains beyond age, the dark veins of her mother -Dylan Thomas

Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard


Slant rhyme l.jpg

Slant Rhyme

  • Rhymes that are CLOSE but not exact.

    • “I know what we’ll do,” she shouts.

    • I know how we’ll work this out.

    • When I have no pain in my heart

    • I will still bear the scar…


Accent l.jpg

Accent

  • The accent on syllables is what determines rhythm in poetry.

  • Accents are patterned so as to form meters in which each line has a definite number of accented units.

  • These meters keep a beat.


Accent or stress l.jpg

Accent, or Stress

  • Most English words have one strong stress.

  • You can discover this by looking in a dictionary and seeing how they are marked, or simply saying the word out loud.

  • Once you’ve determined where the stresses fall, read the line out loud.

  • You’ll find your voice naturally accentuates certain syllables.


Accent or stress8 l.jpg

Accent, or Stress

  • There are patterns of stressed and unstressed syllables.

    • Iambic: - /

    • Trochee: / -

    • Spondee: / /

    • Pyrrhic: - -

    • Anapest: - - /

    • Dactyl: / - -


Onomatopoeia l.jpg

Onomatopoeia

  • A word that imitates the sound it represents

  • Example Words:

    • Splash, pop, kerplunk

      Hands clap and slap, and fingers snap.

      from “Sound Off” by Susan Anderson


Alliteration l.jpg

Alliteration

  • Repetition of the same consonant (letters that are not vowels) sounds in several words

    • “While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping..”

      from “The Raven” by Poe


Assonance l.jpg

Assonance

  • Repetition of similar vowel sounds in words that are close together in a poem.

    • “On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before..”

      • From “The Raven” by Poe


Repetition l.jpg

Repetition

  • Repeated sounds, words, phrases, lines, or stanzas

    • And miles to go before I sleep,

    • And miles to go before I sleep.

      • from “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Frost

  • Because I do not hope to turn again

  • Because I do not hope

  • Because I do not hope to turn....

    • From T. S. Eliot's "Ash-Wednesday":


Personification l.jpg

Personification

  • Giving human characteristics to non-human objects.

    But when the trees bow down their heads,

    The wind is passing by.

    from “Who Has Seen the Wind”

    by Christina Georgina Rossetti


Simile l.jpg

Simile

  • Comparing two things using like or as.

    O My Luve’s like a red, red rose,

    That’s newly sprung in June;

    from “A Red, Red Rose”

    by Robert Burns


Metaphor l.jpg

Metaphor

  • Comparing to things without using like or as. Saying something is something else.

    Life is a broken-winged bird

    That cannot fly.

    from “Dreams’

    by Langston Hughes


Practice l.jpg

Practice

  • 1. We will identify poetic devices in a poem together.

  • 2. In your group use the 4 line stanza you’ve been given and find all the poetic devices you can find. Share with the class.

  • 3. On your own use the 4 line stanza you’ve been given and find all the poetic devices you can find. Share with the class.


Test questions l.jpg

Test Questions

  • What will a test question about this information look like?

  • 1. Which is not an example of alliteration?

    • A. “Awaiting the sensation…”

    • B. “a cheap and chippy chopper..”

    • C. “sit in solemn silence…”

    • D. “big, black block”


Test question sample l.jpg

Test Question- sample

  • Which of the following words rhyme in the stanza?

    (look at stanza 3 on overhead)

    • A. “Bentley” and “Moody”

    • B. “old” and “told”

    • C. “told” and “pen”

    • D. “saw” and “Ben”


  • Login