Session 6
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Session 6. Identifying Indicators. Session Objective. Apply an existing PHE tool to select standardized M&E indicator(s) for a proposed PHE project Formulate local, project-specific indicators. . Key Characteristics of Indicators. PRECISE e.g., defined the same way by all people

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Session 6

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Session 6

Session 6

Identifying Indicators


Session objective

Session Objective

  • Apply an existing PHE tool to select standardized M&E indicator(s) for a proposed PHE project

  • Formulate local, project-specific indicators.


Key characteristics of indicators

Key Characteristics of Indicators

  • PRECISE e.g., defined the same way by all people

  • SENSITIVE e.g., Changes proportionately in response to actual changes in the condition being measured

  • CONSISTENT e.g., Not changing over time so that it always measures the same thing

  • MEASURABLE e.g., able to be recorded and analyzed in quantitative and qualitative terms


Key considerations for indicator selection

Key Considerations for Indicator Selection

  • The intervention itself (e.g., set of activities/procedures)

  • “Target” or the anticipated result in quantifiable terms

  • Result Chain Factor


Result chain factor

Result Chain Factor

SUCCESS

Accurate

Results Chain

Well Executed

Project

Desired

Results

The “if-then” linkage between boxes

leads to

used to

design

THEORY FAILURE

Inaccurate

Results Chain

Well Executed

Project

Desired

Results

does not

lead to

used to

design

PROGRAM FAILURE

Accurate

Results Chain

Poorly Executed

Project

Desired

Results

used to

design

does not

lead to

TOTAL FAILURE!

Inaccurate

Results Chain

Poorly Executed

Project

Desired

Results

does not

lead to

used to

design

SUCCESS = Sound Theory + Good Implementation

Adapted from Foundations for Success (2005). “WWF Standards of Conservation Project and Programme Management”


Results chain crm intervention to achieve a food security outcome

Marine

Protected

Area (MPA)

Established and

Managed by

Community

Coastal

Habitats

Protected

Regeneration

of coral reef

and

associated

reef fish

Improved

flow of

ecological

goods and

services to the

community

Improved

Food

Security

Action /

Intervention

Result Chain Factor

Additional Factors

Establishment and management of MPA by the community

Coastal habitats protected

Coral and fish regenerated, improved flow of ecological goods and services to the community

Results Chain: CRM intervention to achieve a food security outcome


Phe operational linkages assumptions

IF coordinated, THEN conservation and health/population interventions will share the cost/effort leading to improved efficiency

PHE Operational Linkages – Assumptions

Results Chain #1 : Implementation Efficiencies to Achieve Health and Conservation Outcomes

Adapted from Foundations for Success (2005) Conventional Wisdom on Causal Linkages among Population, Health, and Environment Interventions and Targets


Pathway through which projects achieve results

Pathway Through Which Projects Achieve Results

INPUT PROCESS OUTPUT OUTCOME IMPACT*


Type of measurement

Type of Measurement

Process

Results

Population- based and Habitat- based Measures

Program-based Measure

Adapted from Foundations for Success (2005). “WWF Standards of Conservation Project and Programme Management.”


Data collection methods

Data Collection Methods


Using standard phe indicators

Using “Standard” PHE Indicators


Ipopcorm indicators

IPOPCORM Indicators


Integrated indicators

Integrated Indicators

  • Process / Outputs (Program-Based)

  • Number of linked messages/materials created

  • Number and frequency of PHE educational sessions provided in the target community

  • Number of new PHE partnerships created that make linkages among organizations or institutions from different sectors

  • Outcomes / Impacts (Population-Based)

  • Percent of households knowledgeable about or aware of a specific PHE issue

  • Percent of communities in target/project area receiving all three PHE elements

  • Number of enabling local policies supporting PHE

(Measures a linkage aspect of a PHE approach or intervention)


Value added indicators

Value Added Indicators

  • Process / Outputs (Program-Based)

  • Percent of leadership positions held by women on community-based natural resource management committees

  • Net dollar value of FP products socially marketed by CBD agents

  • Amount of money saved each month (firewood expenditure) among households that install and use improved cooking stoves (ICS)

  • Outcomes / Impacts (Population-Based)

  • Percentage of households that earn income from the sale of cooking oil processed from moringa seeds

  • Incidence of acute respiratory infections (ARI) among children under age five

  • Percent of young (15-24 yr) ecologist who report use of condom during last sexual intercourse

(Measures value added in one sector as a result of work targeted in another sector)


Task selecting indicators

TASK - Selecting Indicators

  • Using the MEASURE guide and worksheet, select indicators for each of the sector objectives in your proposed PHE project framework. Select at least one standard indicator for each Intervention/Result Chain Factor (RCF). If you can not locate a suitable indicator, then formulate one.

  • If time permits, work on a second Intervention for one or more of your Sectoral Objectives. Alternatively you could work on an Integrated Indicator or one Value-Added Indicator.

Time: 45 minutes


Session 6

INDICATOR SELECTION WORKSHEET

Sector: __________________


Session 6

Example: Value Added Intervention

Sector: Environment


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