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Chapter 12. Segment Reporting and Decentralization 5/03/04. Decentralization in Organizations. Benefits of Decentralization. Top management freed to concentrate on strategy. Lower-level managers gain experience in decision-making. Decision-making authority leads to job satisfaction.

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Segment reporting and decentralization 5 03 04 l.jpg

Chapter 12

Segment Reporting and Decentralization5/03/04


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Decentralization in Organizations

Benefits of

Decentralization

Top management

freed to concentrate

on strategy.

Lower-level managers

gain experience in

decision-making.

Decision-making

authority leads to

job satisfaction.

Lower-level decision

often based on

better information.

Improves ability to

evaluate managers.


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Decentralization in Organizations

May be a lack of

coordination among

autonomous

managers.

Lower-level managers

may make decisions

without seeing the

“big picture.”

Disadvantages of

Decentralization

Lower-level manager’s

objectives may not

be those of the

organization.

May be difficult to

spread innovative ideas

in the organization.


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An Individual Store

Quick Mart

A Sales Territory

A Service Center

Decentralization and Segment Reporting

Asegmentis any part or activity of an organization about which a manager seeks cost, revenue, or profit data. A segment can also be divisions, manufacturing plants, customers, product lines, departments, etc.


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Cost, Profit, and Investments Centers

Cost Center

A segment whose manager has control over costs,

but not over revenues or investment funds.

Accounting, personnel, R & D,legal, admin.,

Manufacturing, etc.


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Revenues

Sales

Interest

Other

Costs

Mfg. costs

Commissions

Salaries

Other

Cost, Profit, and Investments Centers

Profit Center

A business segment whose manager has control overboth costs and revenues,

but no control over investment funds.

ie., operations, product lines


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Cost, Profit, and Investments Centers

Corporate Headquarters

Investment Center

A segment whose manager has control over costs, revenues, and investments in operating assets.

Divisions, Subsidiaries


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Segmenting Costs

  • Variable costs are easily traceable to their respective segments

  • Fixed costs must be divided up into those costs that are traceable to segments and those that are not

  • Only those costs that are traceable to a segment will be assigned to a segment


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Don’t allocate

common costs.

Traceable

Common

A cost that supports more than one

segment but that would not go

away if any particular segment

were eliminated.

Costs arise because

of the existence of

a particular segment

Traceable and Common Costs

Fixed

Costs


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No computer

division means . . .

No computer

division manager.

Identifying Traceable Fixed Costs

Traceable costswould disappear over time if the segment itself disappeared.


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No computer

division but . . .

We still have a

company president.

Identifying Common Fixed Costs

Common costsarise because of overall operation of the company and are not due to the existence of a particular segment.


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Let’s look more closely at the Television Division’s income statement.

Levels of Segmented Statements

Webber, Inc. has two divisions.


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Cost of goods

sold consists of

variable manufacturing

costs only.

Fixed and

variable costs

are listed in

separate

sections.

Levels of Segmented Statements

Our approach to segment reporting uses the contribution format.


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Levels of Segmented Statements

Our approach to segment reporting uses the contribution format.

Segment margin

is Television’s

contribution

to profits.


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Levels of Segmented Statements

Let’s see how the Television

Division/Segment fits into

Webber, Inc.


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Levels of Segmented Statements


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Levels of Segmented Statements

Common costs should not be allocated to the divisions. These costs would remain even if one of the divisions were eliminated.


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Traceable Costs Can Become Common Costs

Fixed costs that are traceable on one segmented statement can become common if the company is divided intosmaller segments.

Let’s see how this works!


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Traceable Costs Can Become Common Costs

Webber’s Television Division

Product

Lines

Sales

Territories


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Traceable Costs Can Become Common Costs

We obtained the following information from

the Regular and Big Screen segments.


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Traceable Costs Can Become Common Costs

Fixed costs directly traced

to the Television Division

$80,000 + $10,000 = $90,000


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Traceable Costs Can Become Common Costs

The remaining $10,000 cannot be traced to

either the Regular or Big Screen product lines.


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Segment Margin

The segment margin is the best gaugeof the long-run profitability of a segment.

Profits

Time


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Omission of some

Value-chain costs in the

assignment process,

Upstream & downstream

Assignment of costs

to segments that are

really common costs of

the entire organization.

The use of inappropriate

methods for allocating

costs among segments,

ie, Sales, or DL in automated plant

Hindrances to Proper Cost Assignment

The Problems


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Product Customer

R&D Design Manufacturing Marketing Distribution Service

Omission of Costs

Costs assigned to a segment should include all costs attributable to that segment from the company’s entirevalue chain.

Business Functions

Making Up The

Value Chain


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Failure to trace

costs directly

Segment

1

Inappropriate Methods of Allocating Costs Among Segments

Arbitrarily dividing

common costs

among segments

Inappropriate

allocation base

Segment

2

Segment

3

Segment

4


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Allocations of Common Costs


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Quick Check 

How much of the common fixed cost of $200,000 can be avoided by eliminating the bar?

a. None of it.

b. Some of it.

c. All of it.


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Quick Check 

How much of the common fixed cost of $200,000 can be avoided by eliminating the bar?

a. None of it.

b. Some of it.

c. All of it.

A common fixed cost cannot be eliminated by dropping one of the segments.


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Allocated on the basis of sales.

Hurray, now everything adds up!!!

Allocations of Common Costs


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Allocations of Common Costs

Whoops, what about the bar???


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Quick Check 

Should the bar be eliminated?

a. Yes

b. No


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The profit was $44,000 before eliminating the bar. If we eliminate the bar, profit drops to $30,000!

Quick Check 

Should the bar be eliminated?

a. Yes

b. No


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Teaching Note

Allocating common fixed costs to the segments those fixed costs support is a recipe for disaster


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Net operating income

Average operating assets

ROI =

Return on Investment (ROI) Formula

Income before interest

and taxes (EBIT)

Cash, accounts receivable, inventory,

plant and equipment, and other

productive assets.


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$30,000

$200,000

=15%

ROI =

Return on Investment (ROI) Formula

Regal Company reports the following:

Net operating income $ 30,000

Average operating assets $ 200,000

Sales $ 500,000


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Net operating income

Average operating assets

ROI =

Net operating income

Sales

Margin =

Sales

Average operating assets

Turnover =

Margin  Turnover

ROI =

Return on Investment (ROI) Formula


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Net operating income

Sales

Sales

Average operating assets

ROI =

×

$30,000

$500,000

$500,000

$200,000

ROI =

×

ROI =

6%  2.5 = 15%

Margin  Turnover

ROI =

Return on Investment (ROI) Formula


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Controlling the Rate of Return

Three ways to improve ROI . . .

  • Reduce

  • Expenses

  • Increase

  • Sales

  • Reduce

  • Assets


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Controlling the Rate of Return

  • Regal’s manager was able to increase sales to $600,000 which increased net operating income to $42,000.

  • There was no change in the average operating assets of the segment.

Let’s calculate the new ROI.


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Net operating income

Sales

Sales

Average operating assets

ROI =

×

$42,000

$600,000

$600,000

$200,000

ROI =

×

ROI =

7%  3.0 = 21%

Margin  Turnover

ROI =

ROI increased from 15% to 21%

Return on Investment (ROI) Formula


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Management may not know

how to increase ROI.

Managers often inherit many

committed costs over which

they have no control.

Managers evaluated on ROI

may reject profitable

investment opportunities

for the company (because

its bad for their ROI).

Criticisms of ROI


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Criticisms of ROI

  • As division manager at Winston, Inc., your compensation package includes a salary plus bonus based on your division’s ROI -- the higher your ROI, the bigger your bonus.

  • The company requires an ROI of 15% on all new investments -- your division has been producing an ROI of 30%.

  • You have an opportunity to invest in a new project that will produce an ROI of 25%.

As division manager would you

invest in this project?


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Gee . . .

I thought we were

supposed to do what

was best for the

company!

Criticisms of ROI

As division manager,

I wouldn’t invest in

that project because

it would lower my pay!


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Criticisms of ROI

  • So to fix this problem, change the incentive plan to reward the manager for any ROI over and above the firm’s ROI.

  • Duh!


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Review Problem 1

  • Redo report – eliminate common cost allocation

  • Advise on whether to spend advertising money to increase Family Law practice.

  • Answer on Page 552-553


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End of Chapter 12


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