Carl w dell jr ph d changing attitudes and modifying stutters
Download
1 / 10

Carl W. Dell, Jr., Ph.D.: Changing Attitudes and Modifying Stutters - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 251 Views
  • Uploaded on

Carl W. Dell, Jr., Ph.D.: Changing Attitudes and Modifying Stutters . Kelly Brauer & Natasha Check. "Reduction of shame about one's stuttering is a critical factor in any successful therapy program” -Dell . Type of Approach. Follows Van Riper’s Approach of Stuttering Modification

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Carl W. Dell, Jr., Ph.D.: Changing Attitudes and Modifying Stutters' - liz


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Carl w dell jr ph d changing attitudes and modifying stutters l.jpg
Carl W. Dell, Jr., Ph.D.: Changing Attitudes and Modifying Stutters

Kelly Brauer

&

Natasha Check

"Reduction of shame about one's stuttering is a critical factor in any successful therapy program” -Dell


Type of approach l.jpg
Type of Approach Stutters

  • Follows Van Riper’s Approach of Stuttering Modification

    • Goal for the person who stutters is to unlearn maladaptive behaviors

  • Child-based treatment

  • Targets include a child’s moments of stuttering (e.g., repetitions, prolongations, and blocks).

  • Treatment begins slowly


Foundation of dell s approach l.jpg
Foundation of Dell’s approach Stutters

  • Stuttering results from a delay in speech motor coordination.

    • This is similar to such problems as taking longer to develop the gross motor coordination needed for jumping rope or riding a bike.

  • Stuttering is intermittent, variable, and unpredictable.

  • The reason that some children don’t outgrow their disfluencies is because they become self-conscious about their difficulties. This leads them to speak with tension and effort.

  • The child’s feelings and attitudes are an important part of therapy.


Direct treatment 8 phases l.jpg
Direct Treatment Stutters 8 phases

  • Saying words in 3 ways

    • Regular or fluent way, hard stuttering way, easy stuttering way

  • Locating tension

    • Designed to help the child confront and explore stuttering as it occurs

  • Canceling

    • Interruptions that are made during a hard stutter

    • Important to remember this is NOT used outside the therapy room


Direct treatment 8 phases5 l.jpg
Direct Treatment Stutters 8 phases

  • Changing stuttering to a milder form

    • Van Riper’s pull-outs

  • Inserting easy stuttering into real speech

  • Changing hard stuttering with pull-outs during real speech

  • Building fluency

    • Child and clinician decide on a hierarchy of stressful & real-life situations

  • Building independence

    • Fade from therapy

    • Child does not need to be completely “cured” from stuttering


Maintenance generalization l.jpg

Parent involvement Stutters

Once the child is doing well, therapy is discontinued for a period of time

Diminished frequency and severity of stuttering

Confident in controls of stuttering

“Open door policy”

The child may return for additional “booster” sessions if regression occurs

Information provided to parents regarding intervention strategies

Direct and positive responses to the child

Information provided to teacher about stuttering, how to respond objectively to stuttering, and verbal participation in class

Maintenance Generalization


Strengths weaknesses l.jpg

The program is individualized to each child Stutters

Feelings and attitudes associated with stuttering are addressed

The expected outcomes are realistic

Parents and teachers are involved in the intervention process

Follow up sessions available after dismissal

Child and clinician are equal participants

Only applicable to children who stutter

Lack of data to support this approach

No quantitative data

Data is obtained through informal observations and report from the parent(s), teacher, and the child

Most effective with children who stutter intermediately

Strengths Weaknesses


Recommendations l.jpg
Recommendations Stutters

  • Although there isn’t much evidence to support this treatment approach, it presents itself as a beneficial approach to early intervention.


Success according to dell l.jpg
“Success” According to Dell Stutters

  • He questions the criteria for success

  • “If treatment is to be deemed successful, it must be tested over time, but the discipline of collecting longitudinal data is not one I possess” (Dell, 1993).


References l.jpg
References Stutters

Dell, C. (1993). Treating school age stutters. In R. Curlee (Ed.), Stuttering and related disorders of fluency . New York: Thieme.

Guitar, B. (2006). Stuttering an integrated approach to its nature and treatment (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott williams & wilkins.


ad