What is friction lesson 6
Download
1 / 6

What is Friction?/Lesson 6 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 56 Views
  • Uploaded on

What is Friction?/Lesson 6. A force that opposes motion between two surfaces that are in contact. Causes a moving object, such as a ball, to slow down and stop. Occurs because the surface of any object is rough (microscopic hills and valleys). Source of Friction.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' What is Friction?/Lesson 6' - leona


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
What is friction lesson 6
What is Friction?/Lesson 6

A force that opposes motion between two surfaces that are in contact.

Causes a moving object, such as a ball, to slow down and stop.

Occurs because the surface of any object is rough (microscopic hills and valleys)


Source of friction
Source of Friction

  • When two surfaces are in contact, the hills and valleys of one surface stick to the hills and valleys of the other surface.

  • The amount of friction between two surfaces depends on:

    • the force pushing the surfaces together

      • Increase in force = increase in friction

      • Heavier weight = increase in friction

    • the roughness of the surfaces.

      • Rougher surface=more hills and valleys=increase in friction


Types of friction
Types of Friction

  • Kinetic “moving”

    • Friction between moving objects

      • Sliding

        • Applying the brakes of a bicycle

      • Rolling

        • Anything that has wheels

  • Static “not moving”

    • When a force is applied to an object but does not cause it to move

    • Overcome by applying a large amount of force


Friction harmful or helpful
Friction: Harmful or Helpful

Helpful

Harmful

Car tires to ground =

moving car

Car brakes to wheels = stopped car

Pencil to paper = leaves a mark (your handwriting)

Keeps you from slipping and falling when walking

Increased temperature in car parts can wear the parts down

Holes in your socks

Wind and water eroding topsoil that nourishes plants


Reducing friction
Reducing Friction

  • Lubricants applied to surfaces to reduce friction

    • Examples: motor oil, wax, and grease.

  • Changing the type of friction

    • Sliding kinetic friction to rolling kinetic friction

      • Example: ball bearings in in-line skates and bicycles

  • Make surfaces that rub against each other smoother.

    • Rubbing the surfaces with sandpaper


Increasing friction
Increasing Friction

  • Make surfaces rougher

    • Examples: sand scattered on icy roads, baseball players wearing textured batting gloves

  • Increase the force pushing the surfaces together

    • Example: pressing sandpaper harder when sanding a piece of wood.


ad