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Transforming Our Schools. Gender-Biased Harassment Office of Human Relations, Diversity & Equity Judy Chiasson, PhD. Judy Chiasson, Ph.D. Office of Human Relations, Diversity and Equity 213-241-5626 [email protected] A Population at Risk. Diversity Question.

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Transforming our schools
Transforming Our Schools

Gender-Biased Harassment

Office of Human Relations, Diversity & Equity

Judy Chiasson, PhD


Judy Chiasson, Ph.D.

Office of Human Relations, Diversity and Equity

213-241-5626

[email protected]

A Population at Risk


Diversity question
Diversity Question

What does Diversity mean in

Los Angeles?




California protected categories
California Protected Categories

  • Sex

  • Sexual orientation

  • Gender identity

  • Ethnic group identification

  • Race

  • Color

  • National origin

  • Religion

  • Mental or physical disability


Who feels most unwelcome at school
Who feels most unwelcome at school?

Of all populations on our campus, sexual minorities are at the highest risk for a plethora of stress-related behaviors.


Sexual minorities
Sexual Minorities

Lesbian

Gay

Bisexual

Transgender

Queer

Questioning

Intersex

Same Gender Loving

On the Down Low

No label


How many are there
How many are there?

  • 6% of students identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender

  • 16% of students have gay, lesbian, or transgender family members


How many are there1
How many are there?

  • 2.1 million people in LA County are or have LGBTQ family members (10 million x 21%)

  • 10,000 California children are being raised by gay and lesbian parents (US Census)

  • 14,000 foster children are being raised by lgbt parent(s)

  • 65,000 children have been adopted by lgbt parents


The invisible population
The Invisible Population

  • Sexual orientation is invisible.

  • What is the cost of invisibility?

  • It’s high, it’s bad….


How bad is it
How bad is it?

  • 80% of LGBT youth have experienced verbal abuse

  • 44% have been threatened with physical violence


At school
At school

  • 97% youth report hearing anti-gay comments from their peers “frequently”

  • 53% report hearing anti-gay comments made by teachers

  • The average student hears an anti-gay comment 25.5 times per day or every 8 minutes


Guidance counselors
Guidance counselors

  • Two-thirds of guidance counselors harbor negative feelings toward gay and lesbian people.

  • Less than 20% of guidance counselors have received any training on serving gay and lesbian students.


Teachers
Teachers

  • 77% of prospective teachers would not encourage a class discussion on homosexuality.

  • 85% oppose integrating gay/lesbian themes into their existing curricula.


Teachers1
Teachers

  • 80% of prospective teachers report negative attitudes toward gay and lesbian people.

  • 66% of prospective teachers can be classified as “high-grade homophobes.”

  • 52% of prospective teachers report that they would feel uncomfortable working with an openly lesbian or gay colleague.



School shooters
School shooters

  • All school shooters were males who had been mercilessly and routinely teased and bullied.

  • Their violence was retaliatory against teasing that was homophobic in nature (fag, queer, sissy).

    Michael S. Kimmel & Matthew Mahler. Adolescent masculinity, homophobia, and violence: Random school shootings, 1982-2001. The American Behavior Scientist; June 2003, 46.10


Growing up
Growing up

  • LGBT adults report having heard significantly higher frequencies of anti-gay comments while growing up as do heterosexuals.


Who is saying these things
Who is saying these things?

  • Parents

  • Relatives

  • Religious leaders

  • Political leaders

  • Peers

  • Teachers

  • Actors

  • Musicians

  • Comedians





E o green junior high 02 16 08

14-year old Brandon McInerney fatally shot 15-year old Lawrence King because of King’s homosexuality.

E.O. Green Junior High: 02/16/08


Gay youth of color
Gay Youth of Color Lawrence King because of King’s homosexuality.

Sean Ethan Owen

1981-2004


Gay youth of color1

Over 48% of GLBTQ youth of color were verbally harassed in school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

Gay Youth of Color

  • Up to 46% of GLBTQ youth of color experience physical violence related to sexual orientation.

The perpetrator is most likely to be a family member.


Our challenge
Our challenge school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

Understand, empathize and be compassionate about something that may be outside of our own experience.


Challenges to ending discrimination
Challenges to Ending Discrimination school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

Homo uality


Desexualize homosexuality
Desexualize homoSEXuality school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

  • Sexual orientation is a feeling

  • Sexual behavior is an act


We know that
We know that … school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

We have a legal and moral obligation to protect our children.


Legal considerations
Legal Considerations school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

California Safety and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (AB537)

  • Added sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes.

  • Specified deliberate indifference.

  • Removed the corporate shield.


Do our job
Do our job school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

It is our job to make the campus safe for the students, not the students’ job to make the campus safe for us.



Lausd
LAUSD school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

  • Project 10 IMPACT Curriculum

  • Country’s first curriculum for LGBTQ youth

  • Among first in the country to adopt a textbook that addresses sexual orientation and gender identity


Replace labels with faces

LGBT is not a sandwich school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

Replace labels with faces


Be willing to learn
Be willing to learn school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Advocate for them
Advocate for them school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Protect them
Protect them school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Treasure them
Treasure them school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Accept them
Accept them school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Teach them
Teach them school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Prejudice tolerated is intolerance encouraged school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.


Judy Chiasson, Ph.D. school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

Program Coordinator

Office of Human Relations, Diversity and Equity

213-241-5626

[email protected]


Citations
Citations school regarding sexual orientation and race/ ethnicity.

  • Carter K. “Gay Slurs Abound,” in The Des Moines Register, March 7, 1997, p. 1.

  • Garafalo, R., Wolf, C., Kessel, S., Palfrey, J. & DuRant, R (1998). The association between health risk behaviors and sexual orientation among a school-based sample of adolescents. Pediatrics, 101, 895-902.

  • Gates, G., Badgett, M., Chambers, K., & Macomber, J. (2007) Adoption and Foster Care by Gay and Lesbian Parents in the United States, The Williams Institute, UCLA.

  • GLSEN.Just the facts on gay, lesbian and bisexual youth in schools

  • GLSEN/Detroit, Bruised Bodies, Bruised Spirits: An Assessment of the Current Climate of Safety for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth in Southeastern Michigan Schools, pp. 31-33.

  • Hetrick E., and Martin A. D. “Developmental Issues and Their Resolution for Gay and Lesbian Adolescents” in Journal of Homosexuality, 1987.

  • http://www.doe.mass.edu/hssss/yrbs99/glb_rslts.html

  • http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/lausd/offices/eec/project10.htm

  • Human Rights Watch. (2001). Hatred in the hallways: Violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students in U.S. schools. New York: Human Rights Watch.

  • Journal Consulting Clinical Psychology, 1994, 62:261-69.

  • Kosciw JG, Cullen MK. The School-Related Experiences of Our Nation's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth: The GLSEN 2001 National School Climate Survey. New York: GLSEN, 2001.

  • Laumann, E.O., Gagnon, J.H., Michael, RT, Michaels, S. (1994). The social organization of sexuality: Sexual practices in the United States. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

  • Los Angeles County Human Relations Hate Crimes 2005: http://lahumanrelations.org/publications/index.htm

  • PFLAG National Schools Assessment, January 2005

  • Pittman KJ et al. Making sexuality education and prevention programs relevant for African American youth. J Sch Health 1992; 62:339-44.

  • SIECEUS, 2001, Volume 29, #4 

  • Saewyc, E., Bearinger, L., Blum, R., Resnick. M. (1999). Sexual intercourse, abuse and pregnancy among adolescent women: Does sexual orientation make a difference? Family Planning Perspectives, Vol. 31, No. 3, p. 127-131.

  • Stotzer, R. (2007) Comparison of hate crime rates across protected and unprotect groups. The Williams Institute, UCLA.


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